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Democrats reacted with outrage to the Supreme Court declining to block Texas' rigid anti-abortion fetal heartbeat law this week.

The Texas law, passed in May, bans abortions after six weeks or if a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

CNN interviewed liberal author Irin Carmon who noted, "Roe v. Wade said a woman - or pregnant person - has a right to end their pregnancy before viability."

Anti-abortion rights groups cheered the Supreme Court's decision to allow the law which bans abortions after six weeks pf pregnancy.

Texas Right to Life, an anti-abortion group, called the SCOTUS's decision a "massive victory" for the unborn.

Some states have similar fetal heartbeat laws, but the Texas law allows everyday citizens to file lawsuits against anyone who assists women seeking abortions.

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Critics say the law turns common citizens into "bounty hunters" by offering "cash prizes" for citizens who snitch on their neighbors.

They complain that the law is unreasonable because most women don't realize they are pregnant at six weeks.

Pres. Joe Biden called the law an "unprecedented assault" on women. "It unleashes unconstitutional chaos and empowers self-anointed enforcers to have devastating impacts," he said in a statement on Thursday.

He directed federal agencies to see what steps they can take to ensure that women in Texas have access to "safe and legal abortions".

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Vice Pres. Kamala Harris condemned the abortion law. She referred to abortions as "health care".

"The Biden-Harris Administration will always fight to protect access to healthcare and defend a woman's right to make decisions about her body and determine her future," she said in a statement.

"This all-out assault on reproductive health effectively bans abortion for the nearly 7 million Texans of reproductive age. Patients in Texas will now be forced to travel out-of-state or carry their pregnancy to term against their will."

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The U.S. Supreme Court reversed the Biden administration's temporary eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision late Thursday.

Millions of people who haven't paid rent since March 2020 face the risk of losing their homes following the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision.

The SCOTUS ruled that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) did not have the legal authority to impose a temporary ban on evictions.

The Supreme Court wrote:

"The CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination.

"It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts."

 
READ ALSO: Judge overturns CDC's eviction moratorium; 'Eviction bans do more harm than good'
 
The Supreme Court ruling ends protections for 3.5 million people that was originally scheduled to expire in early October.

More than 400,000 renters in the Atlanta area are behind on their rent.

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White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement:

"The Biden Administration is disappointed that the Supreme Court has blocked the most recent CDC eviction moratorium while confirmed cases of the Delta variant are significant across the country.

"As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to COVID-19."

Conservatives said the ruling "ends an unlawful policy" that "restores property rights in America."

The reaction from liberals was swift. Congresswoman Cori Bush (D-Mo.) lashed out at the SCOTUS's decision, saying "Congress must act immediately to prevent mass evictions."

"This is cruel and wrong," tweeted Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.).

"If the public health crisis hasn't ended, then the relief to survive it shouldn't either. We must immediately do everything possible to keep people in their homes. This is a matter of life and death."

And New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called the SCOTUS Justices "A group of right wing extremists" who "just decided to throw families out of their homes during a global pandemic."

Congress previously approved $46.5 billion in emergency rental assistance, but only $5.1 billion has been paid out so far.
 

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett could be seated on the Supreme Court as early as Monday, Oct. 26, barring a last minute Hail Mary from Senate Democrats.

Democratic senators were noticeably missing when the Judiciary Committee voted to advance Barrett's Supreme Court nomination on Thursday.

There are a few more procedural hurdles in the way before Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court on Monday.

First, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will ask the Senate to move to executive session on Friday afternoon. Once that vote is complete, McConnell will immediately file "cloture" on the nomination.

A cloture petition to stop a filibuster -- which could delay Barrett's nomination -- can't be voted on until Sunday because it requires an intervening day (Saturday), according to Fox News.

Once the cloture petition is approved (on Sunday), Senate Democrats have 30 hours to throw that Hail Mary to disrupt Barrett's nomination.

This is the phase when the Democrats "found" an accuser who claimed she was raped by Justice Brett Kavanaugh when he was a teenager. That strategy delayed Kavanaugh's nomination to the bench.

That isn't likely to happen in Barrett's case.

After the 30 hours expires Monday evening, the crucial and much-anticipated confirmation vote begins Monday night.

If this timetable holds, the Senate could confirm Barrett as the 115th Justice on the Supreme Court around 8:15 p.m. EST Monday.

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President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stopped by the Supreme Court to pay their respects to former Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a prolonged battle with pancreatic cancer.

Trump and Ginsburg's relationship was tense and she reportedly said he would not complete his first term in office while she was alive.

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Trump and his wife donned cloth face coverings as they stood at the top of the steps flanking Ginsburg's flag-draped coffin, their heads bowed in prayer on Thursday morning.

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But the somber moment was punctuated by booing and jeering from thousands of mourners who lined up to view Ginsburg's casket.

"Honor her wish!" they yelled, in reference to the alleged deathbed statement asking to delay filling her seat until 2021.

"My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed," Ginsburg allegedly told her grand daughter.

"Vote him out," the crowd chanted. There were also shouts of "Breonna Taylor," in reference to the 29-year-old EMT who was killed when plainclothes officers served a drug warrant at her apartment on March 13.

One officer was charged with shooting into a nearby apartment. But there were no charges directly related to Breonna's death.

The Grand Jury's decision sparked renewed rioting and violence in the streets of Louisville, Kentucky on Wednesday. Two Louisville police officers were wounded by gunfire. One man is in custody. The two officers are expected to survive.

Meanwhile, President Trump will announce his Supreme Court pick on Saturday. Topping the list is Amy Coney Barrett, a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in New Orleans, and a devout Catholic.

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The 48-year-old married mom of two was appointed to the bench by Trump in 2017.

Vice President Mike Pence told ABC News Wednesday that he considers Barrett's strong religious values an asset, rather than a liability.

Trump has the 50 Senate votes he needs to confirm his Supreme Court pick, meaning Ginsburg's seat will be filled before the elections in November.

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The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled President Donald Trump must release his income tax reports and financial documents to NY prosecutors investigating hush money payments as part of a criminal investigation.

In a 7-2 vote, the justices upheld a Manhattan District Attorney subpoena for the last 8 years of Trump's tax reports, including his personal and corporate tax returns, according to TheHill.com.

In his decision, Justice John Roberts writes that the court established unanimously that "No citizen, not even the president, is above the common duty of producing evidence." He went on to say that the president is "not absolutely immune" from state criminal subpoenas seeking his private papers.

In an earlier ruling the lower appeals court directed that the case be returned to the district court where the president may raise further constitutional arguments.

It's unclear whether Trump's tax documents will be released prior to the November elections.

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Bill Cosby's wife Camille is looking forward to her husband coming home while getting a chance to appeal his sexual assault conviction.

The disgraced comedian was sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison in 2018 after he was found guilty of drugging and raping Temple University staff member Andrea Constand in 2004.

The star has repeatedly tried and failed to have the conviction overturned, arguing he did not receive a fair trial.

On Tuesday, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court agreed to review two aspects of the case against Cosby.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court will also examine whether a prosecutor told Cosby he will not face criminal charges in Constand's case after she accepted a financial settlement from the actor.

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Camille is feeling optimistic that he will be released home while his case is under appeal.

She told ABC News Prime: "There are possibilities now. Finally, there is a court ... that has said, 'Wait a minute. There are some problems here. They can be considered for appeal.'"

She added: "I am very, very pleased... but now I'm looking at something that is possible. Possible for vindication. That is the goal."

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The 82-year-old comedian has been incarcerated for almost two years, but producer Camille said she has not visited her husband in prison.

"I do not want to see my husband in that kind of environment, and he doesn't want me to see him in that kind of environment either."

Camille insisted she and her husband communicate every day by phone.

Cosby's representative revealed the actor was "extremely thankful" to the court judges for granting him an opportunity to fight the case, reported Variety magazine.

"As we have all stated, the false conviction of Bill Cosby is so much bigger than him - it's about the destruction of ALL Black people and people of color in America," the spokesperson added.

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Bill Cosby won the right to appeal his 2018 sexual assault conviction on the grounds that the comedian didn't receive a fair trial.

It isn't clear if Cosby will be freed on bond while his case is on appeal.

The 82-year-old is currently serving a 3 to 10-year sentence after a jury found him guilty of drugging and assaulting Andrea Constand during a second trial in 2004. The jury in the first case deadlocked.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court will review whether prosecutors were allowed to call five additional female accusers to testify against Cosby. And whether evidence was introduced that Cosby gave women quaaludes in the past.

According to Page Six, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court will also examine whether a prosecutor told Cosby he would never face criminal charges in Constand's case after she accepted a large settlement payment from him.

Cosby's previous request to be released from prison due to the coronavirus pandemic was denied.

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Homosexuals and Transgender people won a historic victory when the U.S. Supreme Court voted 6-3 to redefine "sex" and rewrite the 1964 anti-discrimination law to add homosexuality and transgenderism.

The historic Supreme Court decision was announced on Monday, June 15. The decision allows homosexuals and trans people to file work discrimination lawsuits in federal court.

The court consolidated three employee discrimination lawsuits into one, including a male employee who insisted on dressing as a female on the job at a Christian funeral home; a skydiving instructor who was fired for telling a customer he was gay; and a county child welfare services coordinator who was fired after his employer learned he was gay.

Republican-appointed Justices John Roberts and Neil Gorsuch joined the liberals on the bench in rendering the decision.

"Today, we must decide whether an employer can fire someone simply for being homosexual or transgender," Gorsuch wrote. "The answer is clear. An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex. Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII forbids."

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Byron Allen is furious over a U.S. Supreme Court decision in his discrimination lawsuit against cable TV giant Comcast.

The billionaire TV mogul criticized the U.S. Supreme Court decision on Monday that dismissed a lower court's ruling that had allowed him to move forward with his case.

Allen accused Comcast of discriminating against him because he is Black, saying Comcast discriminates against minority-owned programming.

Allen argued that Comcast refused to license his TV channels Cats.tv and Pets.tv because he is Black.

But the Supreme Court ruled on Monday that Allen failed to prove Comcast would have licensed his channels if he was not Black.

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"This is a vey bad day for our country," Allen told Yahoo Finance in a statement on Monday.

"Unfortunately, the Supreme Court has rendered a ruling that is harmful to the civil rights of millions of Americans."

Allen added: "We will continue our fight by going to Congress and the presidential candidates to revise the statute to overcome this decision by the United States Supreme Court, which significantly diminishes our civil rights."

In a separate statement, Comcast said it was pleased with the Supreme Court's decision.

"We are proud of our record on diversity and will not rest on this record. We will continue to look for ways to add even more innovative and diverse programming that appeals to our diverse viewership and continue our diversity and inclusion efforts across the company."

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The week is off to a good start for President Donald Trump who suffered political and personal setbacks last week. The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday blocked a NY Lower court order for Trump to release his tax returns to House Democrats in Congress.

Chief Justice John Roberts delayed the release of the tax returns while the Supreme Court considers Trump's appeal. The temporary stay will block the release of Trump's tax returns indefinitely.

The Supreme Court is also considering a separate pending request from Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, who wants to review Trump’s tax returns over allegations that business records were falsified as part of a hush money payment to porn star Stormy Daniels.

A lower court in New York had ordered Trump's longtime accounting firm to turn over the president's financial records to the House Democrats who are in the process of impeaching the president.

Democrats have until Thursday, Nov. 21, to file a response to Chief Justice Roberts' order.

Trump suffered a political defeat after his candidate for governor of Louisiana lost to sitting Governor John Bel Edwards in a state that Trump carried by nearly 20 percentage points in 2016.

Trump had visited the state three times to stump for his candidate, including 48 hours before the gubernatorial election.

Twitter users taunted Trump for tweeting - and deleting - "Louisiana, 3 hours left, get out and vote for @EddieRispone for Governor. Lower taxes and much more!"

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In another setback last week, Trump's friend and former advisor Roger Stone was found guilty on seven charges of lying to Congress, obstruction of Congress, and witness tampering. Stone faces a maximum of 50 years in a federal prison.