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Abortion rights women are on a sex strike across the country to protest the US Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade abortion rights law.

Hundreds of women who marched with protesters in New York City and other cities on Friday and Saturday held signs that read "No sex until we have abortion rights."

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Women say they are no longer willing to risk becoming pregnant since their options are severely limited.
 
RELATED: US Supreme Court Overturns Roe v. Wade
 
Now women on social media have pledged to keep their legs closed to men - including their own husbands - to avoid unwanted pregnancies until the Supreme Court reverses its decision.

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"Women of America: Take the pledge. Because SCOTUS overturned Roe v. Wade, we cannot take the risk of an unintended pregnancy, therefore, we will not have sex with any man — including our husbands — unless we are trying to become pregnant," one Twitter user wrote.

"I live in New York and I am DOUBLE FURIOUS with the Supreme Court. I want to find people who are coordinating a mass sex strike. That is our power," another woman tweeted. "Women have the power here. No more sex until abortion rights are federal law."

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Lizzo announced she will donate $500,000 of her upcoming tour proceeds to Planned Parenthood after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

Live Nation will match Lizzo's donation for a total of $1 million.

Lizzo, born Melissa Viviane Jefferson, made the announcement on her Instagram Story and Twitter on Friday.

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"I'm pledging $500k from my upcoming tour to Planned Parenthood and Abortion Rights. Live Nation agreed to match- to make it 1 MILLION dollars," the pop singer wrote.

"The most important thing is action & loud voices. @plannedparenthood @abortionfunds & organizations like them— will need funding to continue offering services to people who are most harmed by this ban.

'Black women & women of color have historically had disproportionately less access to family planning resources— this is a great loss but not a new one."

Planned Parenthood is a nonprofit organization that earns millions of dollars operating abortion clinics in Black communities.

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On Friday, the US Supreme Court voted to overturn Roe v. Wade, returning the decision to individual states 50 years after Roe v. Wade first became law.

Pro-lifers celebrated on the courthouse steps.

The Supreme Court's decision sparked outrage around the country. Many women feared pregnancy will cramp their lifestyle if they are unable to abort their unwanted babies.

Some Twitter users noted that overturning Roe v. Wade had one positive outcome: Democrats now refer to people who give birth as "women" again.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 SCOTUS decision that the US Constitution protects a pregnant woman's choice to abort her baby.

The ruling means women in the U.S. no longer have constitutional rights to an abortion.

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The six conservative justices voted to overturn Roe v. Wade while the three liberal justices voted against it.

The SCOTUS' decision was announced on Friday, after weeks of death threats and turmoil in the streets.

Anti-abortionists celebrated the decision on the courthouse steps and around the country.

The decision was expected after a clerk leaked an internal memo to Politico.com in May indicating that the SCOTUS justices had the votes to overturn Roe v. Wade.

The ruling will force pregnant women to find unsafe alternatives to abortions. Many women will be forced to travel out of states where abortions are now illegal.

Ohio is one of the states that is expected to make abortions illegal in most situations. Abortions are already illegal in Texas and Georgia.

The U.S. Supreme Court also expanded gun rights in NY state, striking down a law that required gun owners to show cause why they needed a gun license.

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Ana Navarro is calling out Republicans who are in favor of the U.S. Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade pro-abortion law.

On Monday, Politico.com published a draft of an internal SCOTUS memo suggesting the justices plan to overturn Roe v. Wade in a decision at the end of May or in June.

Democrats expressed their outrage and riots erupted in some U.S. cities as pro-abortion activists voiced their disapproval.

CNN contributor Ana Navarro was a guest on Don Lemon Tonight, where she reminded Republicans in Congress that they have daughters and mistresses who might get pregnant.

"Republicans have daughters, young daughters, and mistresses that get pregnant, too. And how many Republican legislators have we heard about in Congress, some of them, who had to leave their jobs because we learned they wanted their mistresses to get abortions," Navarro said. "So this is one of these causes, one of these issues, where now that they got what they wanted, they may regret it. They may be saying to themselves, 'Oh, holy lord. We got what we wanted, now what?'"

Listeners who called into WSB Radio's "Word On the Street" on Monday were split on the issue of overturning Roe v. Wade.

But the tide turned on Tuesday. "The majority of our listeners that called in on Tuesday are against it," said host Shelley Wynter.

Political analysts say the draft leak was intentional to give Democrats - like gubernatorial hopeful Stacey Abrams - a fighting chance in November.

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The White House reacted with outrage after a memo leaked that suggests the Supreme Court voted to overturn Roe v. Wade.

The memo was obtained by Politico.com and published on Monday, May 2. The memo is an initial draft majority opinion written by Justice Samuel Alito.

The Biden administration expressed outrage on Tuesday, saying the White House would be "ready when any ruling is issued" in May or June.

The president also urged voters to elect "more pro-choice senators" during the midterms in November.

"We hold that Roe and Casey must be overruled," Justice Alito wrote in his initial draft. He described doctors and nurses who terminate pregnancies as "abortionists."

The president said overturning Roe v. Wade could impact laws such as "who you marry, whether or not you decide to conceive a child or not, whether or not you can have a abortion, a range of other decisions."

"I just got a call saying that it's been announced that it is a real draft but it doesn't represent who's gonna vote for it yet," Biden said. "I hope there are not enough votes for it."

The memo leak was the first of its kind in SCOTUS history. Chief Justice John Roberts confirmed the draft was legit, and it does not "represent a decision by the court or the final position of any member."

He vowed to investigate the leaker and hold that person accountable. A court clerk has been identified on social media as the culprit.

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U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas was discharged from a hospital after treatment for pneumonia, according to reports.

Justice Thomas was admitted to Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., on March 18, with "flu-like symptoms." Thomas, who is fully vaccinated and boosted, reportedly did not test positive for COVID.

The justice's illness was not announced publicly until Sunday. At that time, a Supreme Court spokesman said he was expected to be release in "a day or two." The Court did not explain why Thomas was discharged after a week-long stay.

At 73, Thomas is the longest-serving justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Decent Twitter users wished Thomas a speedy recovery.

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Justice Clarence Thomas is hospitalized with a respiratory infection, the Supreme Court announced in a statement on Sunday.

Thomas, 73, was admitted to Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C., on Friday evening after experiencing "flu-like" symptoms. He is expected to be released from the hospital in "a day or two."

The Supreme Court confirmed Mr. Thomas is fully vaccinated and boosted, however he does not have a viral infection.

"He underwent tests, was diagnosed with an infection, and is being treated with intravenous antibiotics," the statement read.

"His symptoms are abating, he is resting comfortably, and he expects to be released from the hospital in a day or two."

Thomas and his second wife, Virginia "Ginny" Thomas, were married in 1987.

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Pres. Joe Biden nominated D.C. District Court Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson as the first Black woman to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court. Brown Jackson was the frontrunner on Biden's list.

Biden, 79, made the announcement today, Feb. 25.

The seat will be vacated by Justice Stephen Breyer, who announced his retirement in January.

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Justice Breyer, 83, was the oldest Justice on the high court. He plans to step down at the end of his term this summer.

Breyer's retirement pleases Democrats who believe the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg stayed too long and deprived the Democrats of appointing another liberal to the highest court.

Judge Brown Jackson was nominated to the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia by former President Barack Obama in 2013.

She is married to Dr. Patrick Graves Jackson, the chief general surgeon at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital. They share 2 children.

Brown Jackson is related, by marriage, to former House speaker Paul Ryan. Her brother-in-law is married to Paul Ryan's sister-in-law.

Jackson will become the sixth woman ever to serve on the Supreme Court if she is confirmed by the Senate.

Biden made a vow to nominate the first Black woman to the Supreme Court during the 2020 primary debate in South Carolina.

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Biden made his decision after narrowing his choices down to three women: Jackson Brown, 51, Michelle Childs, 55, and Leondra Kruger, 45.

Biden's vice president, Kamala Harris, 57, who is mixed race, didn't make his list.

She is currently hiding out in an underground nuclear shelter in Jackson Hole, WY, amid the Russia, Ukraine conflict in Europe.
 

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Unvaccinated Black Panther star Letitia Wright was barred from returning to the U.S. after flying home to London to recover from an on-set injury last year.

Wright's banishment, along with positive COVID tests among the crew. forced Marvel Studios to delay the production of the Black Panther sequel.

Last week the U.S. Supreme Court blocked the Biden administration's vaccine mandates as unconstitutional. And now production of Black Panther: Wakanda Forever is back on again, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

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Production for the film is now scheduled to continue this week in Atlanta. There are "about four weeks" of filming left on the Ryan Coogler-directed project, according to THR.

Wright sustained minor injuries while filming a Black Panther scene in August. A controversial tweet by the actress appeared to be anti-vax, but Wright denied it.

She later deleted her Twitter page and returned to England.

The sequel also stars Danai Gurira, Daniel Kaluuya, Winston Duke, Nyong'o, Florence Kasumba and Angela Bassett.

Wakanda Forever is the first movie in the franchise following Chadwick Boseman's death in 2020 from colon cancer.

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The U.S. Supreme Court blocked the Biden administration's vaccine-or-test mandate for workplaces with over 100 employees.

The court allows vaccine mandates for healthcare workers at federally funded hospitals and clinics nationwide.

The Justices voted 6-3 to strike down the Biden administration's vaccine mandate for private corporations and large workplaces.

The Court also voted 5-4 to allow a vaccine mandate for workers at health care facilities that receive Medicare and Medicaid.

27 Republican governors asked the Court to block vaccine mandates proposed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The Biden administration had asked the Court to allow vaccine mandates for healthcare workers.

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Democrats reacted with outrage to the Supreme Court declining to block Texas' rigid anti-abortion fetal heartbeat law this week.

The Texas law, passed in May, bans abortions after six weeks or if a fetal heartbeat can be detected.

CNN interviewed liberal author Irin Carmon who noted, "Roe v. Wade said a woman - or pregnant person - has a right to end their pregnancy before viability."

Anti-abortion rights groups cheered the Supreme Court's decision to allow the law which bans abortions after six weeks pf pregnancy.

Texas Right to Life, an anti-abortion group, called the SCOTUS's decision a "massive victory" for the unborn.

Some states have similar fetal heartbeat laws, but the Texas law allows everyday citizens to file lawsuits against anyone who assists women seeking abortions.

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Critics say the law turns common citizens into "bounty hunters" by offering "cash prizes" for citizens who snitch on their neighbors.

They complain that the law is unreasonable because most women don't realize they are pregnant at six weeks.

Pres. Joe Biden called the law an "unprecedented assault" on women. "It unleashes unconstitutional chaos and empowers self-anointed enforcers to have devastating impacts," he said in a statement on Thursday.

He directed federal agencies to see what steps they can take to ensure that women in Texas have access to "safe and legal abortions".

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Vice Pres. Kamala Harris condemned the abortion law. She referred to abortions as "health care".

"The Biden-Harris Administration will always fight to protect access to healthcare and defend a woman's right to make decisions about her body and determine her future," she said in a statement.

"This all-out assault on reproductive health effectively bans abortion for the nearly 7 million Texans of reproductive age. Patients in Texas will now be forced to travel out-of-state or carry their pregnancy to term against their will."

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The U.S. Supreme Court reversed the Biden administration's temporary eviction moratorium in a 6-3 decision late Thursday.

Millions of people who haven't paid rent since March 2020 face the risk of losing their homes following the Supreme Court's 6-3 decision.

The SCOTUS ruled that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) did not have the legal authority to impose a temporary ban on evictions.

The Supreme Court wrote:

"The CDC has imposed a nationwide moratorium on evictions in reliance on a decades-old statute that authorizes it to implement measures like fumigation and pest extermination.

"It strains credulity to believe that this statute grants the CDC the sweeping authority that it asserts."

 
READ ALSO: Judge overturns CDC's eviction moratorium; 'Eviction bans do more harm than good'
 
The Supreme Court ruling ends protections for 3.5 million people that was originally scheduled to expire in early October.

More than 400,000 renters in the Atlanta area are behind on their rent.

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White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement:

"The Biden Administration is disappointed that the Supreme Court has blocked the most recent CDC eviction moratorium while confirmed cases of the Delta variant are significant across the country.

"As a result of this ruling, families will face the painful impact of evictions, and communities across the country will face greater risk of exposure to COVID-19."

Conservatives said the ruling "ends an unlawful policy" that "restores property rights in America."

The reaction from liberals was swift. Congresswoman Cori Bush (D-Mo.) lashed out at the SCOTUS's decision, saying "Congress must act immediately to prevent mass evictions."

"This is cruel and wrong," tweeted Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.).

"If the public health crisis hasn't ended, then the relief to survive it shouldn't either. We must immediately do everything possible to keep people in their homes. This is a matter of life and death."

And New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called the SCOTUS Justices "A group of right wing extremists" who "just decided to throw families out of their homes during a global pandemic."

Congress previously approved $46.5 billion in emergency rental assistance, but only $5.1 billion has been paid out so far.
 

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett could be seated on the Supreme Court as early as Monday, Oct. 26, barring a last minute Hail Mary from Senate Democrats.

Democratic senators were noticeably missing when the Judiciary Committee voted to advance Barrett's Supreme Court nomination on Thursday.

There are a few more procedural hurdles in the way before Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court on Monday.

First, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will ask the Senate to move to executive session on Friday afternoon. Once that vote is complete, McConnell will immediately file "cloture" on the nomination.

A cloture petition to stop a filibuster -- which could delay Barrett's nomination -- can't be voted on until Sunday because it requires an intervening day (Saturday), according to Fox News.

Once the cloture petition is approved (on Sunday), Senate Democrats have 30 hours to throw that Hail Mary to disrupt Barrett's nomination.

This is the phase when the Democrats "found" an accuser who claimed she was raped by Justice Brett Kavanaugh when he was a teenager. That strategy delayed Kavanaugh's nomination to the bench.

That isn't likely to happen in Barrett's case.

After the 30 hours expires Monday evening, the crucial and much-anticipated confirmation vote begins Monday night.

If this timetable holds, the Senate could confirm Barrett as the 115th Justice on the Supreme Court around 8:15 p.m. EST Monday.

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President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stopped by the Supreme Court to pay their respects to former Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a prolonged battle with pancreatic cancer.

Trump and Ginsburg's relationship was tense and she reportedly said he would not complete his first term in office while she was alive.

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Trump and his wife donned cloth face coverings as they stood at the top of the steps flanking Ginsburg's flag-draped coffin, their heads bowed in prayer on Thursday morning.

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But the somber moment was punctuated by booing and jeering from thousands of mourners who lined up to view Ginsburg's casket.

"Honor her wish!" they yelled, in reference to the alleged deathbed statement asking to delay filling her seat until 2021.

"My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed," Ginsburg allegedly told her grand daughter.

"Vote him out," the crowd chanted. There were also shouts of "Breonna Taylor," in reference to the 29-year-old EMT who was killed when plainclothes officers served a drug warrant at her apartment on March 13.

One officer was charged with shooting into a nearby apartment. But there were no charges directly related to Breonna's death.

The Grand Jury's decision sparked renewed rioting and violence in the streets of Louisville, Kentucky on Wednesday. Two Louisville police officers were wounded by gunfire. One man is in custody. The two officers are expected to survive.

Meanwhile, President Trump will announce his Supreme Court pick on Saturday. Topping the list is Amy Coney Barrett, a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in New Orleans, and a devout Catholic.

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The 48-year-old married mom of two was appointed to the bench by Trump in 2017.

Vice President Mike Pence told ABC News Wednesday that he considers Barrett's strong religious values an asset, rather than a liability.

Trump has the 50 Senate votes he needs to confirm his Supreme Court pick, meaning Ginsburg's seat will be filled before the elections in November.

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The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled President Donald Trump must release his income tax reports and financial documents to NY prosecutors investigating hush money payments as part of a criminal investigation.

In a 7-2 vote, the justices upheld a Manhattan District Attorney subpoena for the last 8 years of Trump's tax reports, including his personal and corporate tax returns, according to TheHill.com.

In his decision, Justice John Roberts writes that the court established unanimously that "No citizen, not even the president, is above the common duty of producing evidence." He went on to say that the president is "not absolutely immune" from state criminal subpoenas seeking his private papers.

In an earlier ruling the lower appeals court directed that the case be returned to the district court where the president may raise further constitutional arguments.

It's unclear whether Trump's tax documents will be released prior to the November elections.