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Henry Mountbatten-Windsor, Duke of Sussex, and his American wife Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, have officially quit the royal family, leaving behind a life of service to their British subjects.

Meghan had a parting shot for England's Queen Elizabeth II who stripped them of their remaining service roles after they announced their second child will be born American.

The news comes just months after the mom-to-be opened up about her heartbreaking miscarriage in July 2020.

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Her Majesty the Queen said she was "saddened by their decision" to abandon their life of public service, and she wished "the Sussexes" a happy new life in America.

Meghan shot back at the Queen with a subtle dig: "We can all live a life of service. Service is universal," she wrote in a statement.

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As you know, Harry and Meghan abandoned their royal duties in 2019. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Meghan became engaged to Harry in 2017 and they wed in 2018. Their son, Archie Mountbatten-Windsor, was born the following year.

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On January 8, 2020, the couple announced their intentions to step away from public service. They moved to Canada and then to America to pursue celebrity stardom in movies and television -- roles which have eluded them since Americans don't much care for royals.

On Valentine's Day, Harry, 36, and Meghan, 39, announced they are expecting their second baby born on American soil.

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In a rare statement this week, the Queen confirmed Harry and Meghan's eight military roles and patronages were revoked and redistributed to "working members of the royal family" who know their roles as humble public servants.

After living rent-free in Tyler Perry's West Coast mansion, the former royals purchased their own home in California.

The final insult to the Royal family will come when Harry applies for American citizenship.

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Two women were so desperate to get the still experimental Covid-19 mRNA shots that they dressed up as "grannies" to skip the line.

Florida health officials say the two women aroused suspicion immediately.

"So yesterday, we realized a couple of young ladies came dressed up as grannies to get vaccinated for the second time. So I don't know how they escaped the first time," said Dr. Raul Pino, the director of the Florida Department of Health in Orange County, during a press briefing on Thursday.

According to Dr. Pino, the two women showed up to the Orange County Convention Center wearing bonnets, gloves and glasses -- "the whole thing," he said. The women wore disguises to make themselves eligible to receive the vaccination outside of a health care or long-term care facility setting.

The women had valid vaccination cards for their first injections, but there was an issue with their driver's licenses on the second go 'round.

Their dates of birth "did not match those they had used to register for the vaccines," said the Orange County Sheriff's Office in a statement. "The names, however, did match the registration."

The sheriff's office identified the women as Olga Monroy-Ramirez, 44, and Martha Vivian Monroy, 34.

The women were not arrested or cited. But security was increased at the vaccination site.

"This is the hottest commodity that is out there right now," the director said. "So we have to be very careful with the funds and the resources that we are provided."

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The FBI and U.S. attorney are investigating New York Governor Andrew Cuomo's handling of nursing home deaths during the Coronavirus outbreak.

Democrats are moving to strip Cuomo of his emergency powers while the investigation is ongoing.

Last March, Cuomo issued an order sending coronavirus patients from hospitals into nursing homes, rather than to a Navy hospital ship that was anchored in the NY harbor.

Thousands of elderly nursing home residents died after being exposed to the sick patients.

Cuomo came under fire this month when Secretary to the Governor Melissa DeRosa told a group of key Democrats in a closed-door meeting that Cuomo's administration had initially undercounted the true numbers of deaths of elderly residents by 50 percent.

Queens assemblyman Democrat Ron Kim was among those angry over the revelation. His uncle died in a nursing home.

"You can't hide information because you think you could be politically hurt in the process," Kim said during the virtual meeting.

DeRosa said the administration withheld information requested by the DOJ because “President Trump turns this into a giant political football... He directs the Department of Justice to do an investigation into us... Basically, we froze because then we were in a position where we weren't sure if what we were going to give to the [DOJ] or what we give to you guys... Was going to be used against us..."

Family members are furious that the Democrats were playing politics with their loved ones' lives.

"We need to get people subpoenaed. We need to get them under oath and find out who knew what when," Republican Assemblyman William Barclay said.

The GOP criticized the DOJ for not ramping up the investigation months ago when it was common knowledge that thousands died as a result of Cuomo's order.
 

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A Texas mayor who told city residents impacted by winter power outages that "no one owes you or your family anything" has resigned as mayor.

Colorado City Mayor Tim Boyd announced his resignation in a post on his Facebook page Tuesday. City manager David Hoover confirmed the resignation to NBC News.

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In a since deleted Facebook post Tuesday morning, Boyd told residents to "sink or swim" and stop "looking for a damn handout."

"No one owes you or your family anything," he wrote, "nor is it the local governments responsibility to support you during trying times like this! Sink or swim, it's your choice!"

He continued: "The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING! I'm sick and tired of people looking for a damn hand out!"

In his typo-filled post, Boyd reportedly told people to "step up" and come up with their own "game plan" to stay warm after the power was cut to over 4 million homes in Texas on Tuesday.

"If you don’t have electricity you step up and come up with a game plan to keep your family warm and safe. If you have no water you deal with out and think outside of the box to survive and supply water to your family," he continued. "If you were sitting at home in the cold because you have no power and are sitting there waiting for someone to come rescue you because your lazy is direct result of your raising! Only the strong will survive and the week will perish [sic]."

Boyd concluded the message by saying "Get off your ass and take care of your own family!", KTXS reports.

Hours later, Boyd posted a follow-up message announcing his resignation:

"I would never want to hurt the elderly or anyone that is in true need of help to be left to fend for themselves," he reportedly wrote. "I was only making the statement that those folks that are too lazy to get up and fend for themselves but are capable should not be dealt a handout."

Boyd added that his wife was laid off from her school job for defending him.

"The anger and harassment you have caused my wife and family is so undeserved.... my wife was laid off of her job based off the association people gave to her and the business she worked for. She’s a very good person and was only defending me! But her to have to get fired from her job over things I said out of context is so horrible [sic]."

Millions of Texans are still without water or electric as winter storms brought snow, ice and record low temperatures to the state.

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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms expressed concerns about the NBA All-Star game coming to Atlanta.

The 2021 All-Star game is scheduled to take place on March 7 in Atlanta. But Mayor Bottoms has concerns about out-of-towners coming to a city already struggling with high crime.

Atlanta was wide open when other Democratic cities were locked down tight during the Covid-19 outbreak.

While other cities shut down businesses and nightclub venues, clubs in Atlanta are packed with maskless patrons every night.

Atlanta is battling a violent crime wave that shows no sign of slowing down. Out-of-towners are responsible for the spike in crime.

"I'm open to suggestions," Bottoms said after a 7-year-old girl was shot outside an upscale shopping mall in affluent Buckhead.

A woman was shot in a movie theater after she shushed two patrons in January. Camryn King, 20, and Yvonne Crawford, 22, were arrested by U.S. Marshals on Wednesday, Feb. 17. They will be extradited from Indiana to face trial.

The victim, who had been shot in the shoulder, was treated for non life-threatening injuries and released from a hospital.

Mayor Bottoms is concerned that the All-Star game will attract even more criminals to her besieged city.

"Under normal circumstances, we'd be grateful for the opportunity to host the NBA All-Star game, but this isn’t a typical year," Mayor Bottoms tweeted. "I have shared my concerns related to public health and safety with the NBA and Atlanta Hawks. We are in agreement that this is a made-for-TV event only, and people should not travel to Atlanta to party."

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An emergency medicine doctor in New York sparked fury on social media when he called the Covid-19 mRNA vaccines "reparations for Black people."

Dr. Steven McDonald is a board-certified emergency medicine attending physician at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

His credentials make him uniquely qualified to comment on Covid-19 vaccines. But he angered social media users when he said Black people should consider the vaccines as "reparations" for 200 years of slavery.

"You can think of the vaccines almost as medical reparations," he told VICE. "It's the 40 acres and a mule, um, but of 2021. So we really should be giving this vaccine preferentially to people of color..."

Doctors and globalists have repeatedly claimed that Blacks and Hispanics are "disproportionately affected" by the coronavirus.

The reaction was swift.

Social media activist Tariq Nasheed tweeted: "So, now vaccines are reparations?"

A Twitter user wrote: "By that logic, the Tuskegee Experiment is “reparations.""

"These people are insane," wrote an Instagram user. "Cut us our checks & we'll do what we need to do for ourselves."

Another commenter wrote: "I just reached out to [Dr. McDonald] to understand his rationale behind that statement. Let's see if he replies. Crazy times we live in."

Meanwhile, the White House on Wednesday announced yet another "study" on reparations for people of color.
 

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Controversial political radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh has lost his battle with lung cancer. He was 70.

The radio icon passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 17, according to Limbaugh's widow, Kathryn, who announced his death on Limbaugh's popular radio show.

Limbaugh revealed his Stage 4 lung cancer diagnosis in February, 2020 -- the day before President Donald Trump honored him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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Former First Lady Melania Trump presented him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom during President Trump's State of the Union address in the chamber of the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington, DC on Feb. 4, 2020.

Limbaugh launched his popular syndicated radio show in 1988, and quickly became one of the most influential conservative voices in media. He was a staunch and unwavering Trump supporter until the end.

Last year, his show aired on more than 600 stations via Premiere Networks and reached 27 million people weekly.

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Kalina Collier is looking for work after she was let go by her former employer, JetBlue, for allegedly faking her kidnapping in Jamaica.

Collier reportedly made up the elaborate hoax to avoid being quarantined after testing positive for Covid-19.

Collier posted several videos on social media, claiming that her positive Covid-19 tests were fraudulent because the Jamaican government wanted to hold her at a hotel for sex trafficking or organ trafficking purposes.

Foreigners who test positive after arriving on the Caribbean island are quarantined in a hotel at the government's expense until they test negative.

Collier arrived in Jamaica on January 28 and was scheduled to depart on February 1. She previously tested positive using a rapid antigen test.

Not satisfied with the result, she took another test 30 minutes later, which turned out negative.

The Jamaican Health Ministry's protocol for false positive tests is to take a PCR test, which is determined to be more accurate.

On Feb. 2, Collier's test came back positive, which led to the quarantine order.

But Collier took to Instagram, claiming she was being held against her will in an unknown location for sex trafficking purposes.

Among those she reached out to include YouTube star and social media influencer Amanda Seales, who took up Collier's cause.

Soon the hashtag #FindKalinaCollier was trending on social media, as family and friends claimed they couldn't locate her in Jamaica.

Collier recorded videos on her cell phone, saying she didn't know where she was, or the day or date. She also alleged there were cameras in her room watching her.

But social media users quickly identified the "cameras" as motion sensors and smoke detectors.

After the news media picked up the kidnap story, the hotel provided video to show that Collier was being picked up from the hotel every day in a Mazda car driven by her mother.

Collier's story soon unraveled and she was terminated by JetBlue. She was cleared to leave the island on Feb. 15 after quarantining for 14 days.

Jamaican residents were understandably outraged by her behavior.

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Translated: "This is what we have to resort to because she wants to draw Jamaica into the foolishness about kidnapping of a foreigner. We already have so much to deal with and this is what she picks??? Hurry up and go back to your country!!!!! Please and thank you."

Another wrote in Jamaican Patois:

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(Translated: "You shouldn't have rented her the vehicle. Make her walk back home. Who is she to kidnap?")

JetBlue officials issued an apology to the Jamaican government and to the Jamaican people for the "frustration and concern this incident has caused and reiterate our confidence in the health protocols Jamaica has put in place."
 

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg expressed his concerns over the still experimental Covid-19 mRNA vaccines in a video leaked by Project Veritas.

Zuckerberg expressed concern that the mRNA vaccines may be modifying people's DNA.

Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encodes proteins of Covid-19 which are inserted into human cells to stimulate the immune system to make antibodies.

A successful mRNA vaccine has never been approved for use in humans in history.

In the leaked video, Zuckerberg expressed his concerns about the "long-term side effects" of "basically modifying people's DNA and RNA" to fight Covid-19.

"I share some caution on this [vaccine] because we just don't know the long-term side effects of basically modifying people's DNA and RNA," Zuckerberg said in the leaked Zoom video.

But in a public video several months later, Zuckerberg repeated Dr. Anthony Fauci's claim that the vaccines do not modify DNA or RNA.

First of all, DNA is inherent in your own nucleus cell. Sticking in anything foreign will ultimately get cleared," said Fauci.

But Fauci doesn't clarify whether he is talking about the foreign mRNA in the Covid-19 vaccines.

Any discussion of the Covid-19 vaccines modifying DNA is banned from the Facebook platform.

Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe said that Zuckerberg imposes standards on his users that he does not live up to himself in private.

"Isn't it interesting that Zuckerberg can vacillate and evolve his thinking on the subject of vaccines. But as soon as he's made up his mind, or appears to have made up his mind on a topic, he disallows the almost 3 billion Facebook users to do the same?," said O’Keefe.

He added: "Rules for thee, but not for me."

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Millions are without power or water in Texas after a historic storm caused massive power outages amid subfreezing temperatures.

At least 5 people are reported dead in their homes as 150 million people in 25 states are under winter advisories.

Rolling power outages began Monday to prevent the total collapse of the power grid in Texas. 1.2 million homes were without electricity as of Monday evening.

Residents took to social media for information amid rolling outages that lasted longer than 45 minutes.

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4.3 million residents are without power in Texas alone after a blast of arctic air arriving from Canada froze wind turbines that generates electricity in West Texas. The frozen turbines knocked the power grid offline, causing massive power outages in homes and businesses.

Wind farms across the state generate up to a combined 25,100 megawatts of energy. The power grid in Texas was still struggling to go back online as demand for electricity to heat homes surged early Tuesday.

Some power — enough to serve about 500,000 homes — was being restored to the state's power grid Monday evening, said a spokesman for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT).

In Houston, a woman and a girl died from suspected carbon monoxide poisoning from a car running in an attached garage, police said.

The rolling blackouts in Texas affected neighboring states such as Arkansas and Missouri.

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The deadly winter storm spawned a tornado that killed three in North Carolina.

There are reports of people trapped in their homes in Brunswick County, as emergency services mobilized to rescue people whose homes were ripped from their foundations by a possible tornado.

"It's something like I have never seen before. A lot of destruction," said Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram during a press conference early Tuesday. "It's going to be a long recovery process."