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NASCAR Cup Series driver Bubba Wallace has called it quits after three seasons as a driver for Richard Petty Motorsports.

Wallace, 26, enjoyed his best season with one top 5 result and five top-ten finishes. He finished second in the 2018 Daytona 500, and 2nd at last year's Brickyard 400 at Indianapolis Speedway.

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The mixed-race driver was known more for his Black Lives Matter activism than for his achievements on the track. Wallace, pictured above with Richard Petty, explained his decision in a statement.

"This was not an easy decision as I have nothing but the utmost respect for Richard Petty and his family," Wallace wrote. "But I believe it's time for someone else to take over the reins of the No. 43."

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Wallace is best known for the "noose scandal" that rocked NASCAR in June. The FBI sent 15 agents to Talladega Superspeedway to investigate Wallace's "noose" that turned out to be a garage door pull.

Conservative talk radio host Wayne Dupree called Wallace "the Colin Kaepernick of NASCAR."

"...it was the "noose scandal" that put things over the top – and not even the circus-like outcome of that whole fiasco, but Bubba's rude and nasty attitude towards fans that was really cinched his place as the NASCAR villain. He even got booed on the track – well deserved, to be honest."

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A police officer found himself outmatched by a suspect who didn't want to go to jail. Te cop attempted to arrest the man, as a crowd of bystanders looked on and laughed.

Within seconds the cop was on his back with the man standing over him, punching him in the face and getting the best of him.

Then the unexpected happened.

Watch the video below to find out what happens next.
 

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Protesters forced the closure of hundreds of pharmacies in South Africa after it ran a hair advertisement that many South Africans deemed racist.

The Clicks pharmacy advertisement featured pictures of African hair labeled as "dry and damaged," while an image of Caucasian hair was described as "fine and flat."

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Opposition party Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) called the adverts "racist" and "dehumanizing."

EFF leader Julius Malema organized protests outside the Clicks stores and called for all Clicks to be closed.

The company has threatened legal action against EFF, but Mr. Malema urged his supporters to be "combat ready" and said EFF wouldn't be "intimidated by threats."

"The implications of this are that black identity exists as inferior to the identity of white people. It is an assertion that white standards of beauty are to be aspired to and features of black represent damage, decay and abnormality," the EFF said in a statement obtained by Yahoo News.

Videos shared on Twitter shows some stores closed while others are guarded by security. In one incident, a bottle filled with a flammable liquid was thrown inside a Clicks store. Another video shows protesters pulling items off shelves in one store.

But demonstrations have been largely peaceful. "We are confronting white arrogance decisively. #clicksmustfall," EFF tweeted on Tuesday.

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A Phase 3 vaccine developed by drug manufacturer AstraZeneca was put on hold when a volunteer in the UK fell ill after suffering a "serious adverse reaction" to the vaccine.

The vaccine being developed by drug manufacturer AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford in England was put on hold after a UK participant experienced a "serious adverse reaction".

The adverse reaction was described only as an "unexplained illness" in one of the trials.

A spokesperson for AstraZeneca, the frontrunner in the race for the first Covid-19 RNA vaccine, said in a statement on Tuesday that the company's "standard review process triggered a pause" to allow for a "review of safety data."

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Another source within the company, who spoke to Statnews.com on condition of anonymity, said the adverse reaction is having an impact on other AstraZeneca vaccine trials, as well as clinical trials being conducted by different vaccine manufacturers.

Nine drug manufacturers have vaccine studies currently under way in the U.S. and abroad.

The U.S. is currently testing vaccines at 62 sites across the country, according to clinicaltrials.gov.

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AstraZeneca's clinical trial is the first to reach the critical Phase 3 stage - the final step before the vaccine gets FDA approval. The normal timeframe for clinical trials is three years.

Adverse reactions to vaccines that require hospitalization may include life-threatening illness and even death.

Doctors in the U.S. are concerned that the vaccines are being rushed to market without adequate time to determine side effects.

Although healthcare professionals are due to get the vaccines first, many doctors and nurses say they will decline to take a vaccination that is rushed to market -- particularly since the Covid death rate is way below 1%.

Fully one third of Americans say they will refuse the vaccine if one is available before the election in November.

News of the adverse reaction sent AstraZeneca's stock tumbling 8% in after hours trading on Tuesday.

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Colorado police were called to a 12-year-old boy's home after he accidentally waved a toy gun during a virtual class.

Isaiah Elliott was home alone when a teacher called police to say he played with a toy gun during virtual art class.

The teacher admitted she knew the gun was a toy - it was a black and green plastic toy with the words "Zombie Hunter" on the side. But the teacher perceived the toy gun as a threat.

The boy's mother, Dani Elliott, was at work when she received a call from the school's principal saying officers were on their way to her home.

Elliott says she was terrified - especially because her son is Black.

"I never thought: 'You can't play with a Nerf gun in your own home because somebody may perceive it as a threat and call the police on you,'" Elliott said.

To add insult to injury, Isaiah was suspended for 5 days and now has a criminal record with the El Paso County Sheriff's Office.

He also has a disciplinary mark in his school records for bringing a "facsimile of a firearm to school" -- even though he was in his own home.

Elliott vented her frustration at the school and the police. She said her son has attention deficit disorder (ADHD) and he is easily distracted, so he played with his gun.

"With the cultural events going on right now, especially for young African Americans, you calling the police and telling them that he could have a gun, you put his life in jeopardy," Elliott said.

In a statement on Facebook, the Grand Mountain School administration blamed disinformation on the internet for the public uproar.

"We never have or ever will condone any form of racism or discrimination," the statement said. "Safety will always be number one for our students and staff. We follow board policies and safety protocols consistently, whether we are in-person or distance learning."

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Kamala Harris refuses to say whether she would take the RNA vaccine if it becomes available in October or November.

President Trump has insisted a vaccine will be available by the end of the year, and potentially before the November 3 elections.

"It will be delivered before the end of the year, in my opinion, before the end of the year, but it really might even be delivered before the end of October," Trump said Thursday. "How do you like that? Wouldn't that be nice?"

But the Democratic vice presidential candidate said she doesn't trust Trump's word on the safety or efficacy of a vaccine that was rushed through three years' worth of clinical trials in a matter of months.

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In an interview with CNN, Harris said, "I would not trust Donald Trump and it would have to be a credible source of information that talks about the efficacy and the reliability of whatever he's talking about. I will not take his word for it."

Alarm bells went off when the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sent letters to governors in every state requesting that states consider "waiving requirements" to allow vaccine distribution sites to be fully operational by November 1st.

Unlike normal vaccines, RNA vaccines are "encoded" with genetic "instructions" that tell your cells what to do.

Many Americans expressed concern that the CDC might be subjecting them to a potentially harmful vaccine.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who sits on the White House Coronavirus Task Force, doesn't share their concern.

In an interview with Kaiser Health News earlier this week, Fauci said that Phase Three of the clinical trials could end earlier than expected, if the results prove "overwhelmingly positive."

Fauci told the publication that the Data and Safety Monitoring Board had a "moral obligation" to end the third phase of clinical trials early if the results were significant.

"I'm not concerned about political pressure," he added.

Fully one third of Americans say they would refuse the RNA vaccination even if it was deemed safe by the FDA and distributed to all 50 states before the election.

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Instagram

A video of a father and stepmother disciplining their disobedient daughter is going viral on social media.

The video has sparked debate over whether the father and stepmother are being abusive to the girl.

The video shows a father apparently abusing his teenage daughter who allegedly stole something and called his wife a "fat a** b*tch".

The video went viral after celebrities such as Lil Scrappy posted it on social media.

Some are calling for child protective services to investigate.

Update:

The girl is in the custody of rapper Waka Flocka's mom, Debra Antney, who is reportedly related to her. See the videos below.
 


 

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Michelle Obama insists her marriage to former President of the U.S. Barack Obama is not on the rocks, even though it is far from perfect.

The former First Lady, who will celebrate her 28th wedding anniversary with Barack next month, spoke candidly about the ups and downs of her marriage with guest Conan O'Brien on the latest installment of The Michelle Obama Podcast.

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Michelle, who reportedly suffers from situational depression, seemed to confirm rumors that she and Barack are often at war with each other.

"There were times that I wanted to push Barack out of the window. And I say that because it's like, you've got to know the feelings will be intense. But that doesn't mean you quit," she says.

She also admitted that they sometimes live apart in the 5 mansions they own. "And these periods can last a long time. They can last years."

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Michelle, pictured with Barack during happier times, said no marriage is perfect and she went on to share advice for women looking for that perfect man (hint: he doesn't exist).

Mrs. Obama said searching for a suitable life partner is like assembling an all-star basketball team.

"You want LeBron (James). You don't want the guy, third row on the bench, who didn't make the team, but we often don't think about that," she shares.

"What you're supposed to say, is, 'I have married LeBron. My version of LeBron,'" said Michelle.

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Some social media users took that as a diss toward women like singer Monica Arnold, who married L.A. Lakers bench warmer Shannon Brown, only to see him get cut by the team a year later. Brown is now a used car salesman in Atlanta.

The 'Becoming' author also stressed the importance of giving yourself time to see the person you're dating "in an array of situations," and insists, "You can't Tinder your way into a long-term relationship."

"There's no magic way to make that happen except getting the basics of finding somebody, being honest about wanting to be with them, to date them seriously, to plan on making a commitment, to date them, seeing where it goes, and then making it happen," she adds.

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Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are in hot water with Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. The Duke and Duchess neglected to tell Buckingham Palace about their $150 million Netflix deal to develop upcoming projects on the American streaming network.

Harry, 35, and Meghan, 39, recently purchased a $14 million Santa Barbara mansion. They signed a $150 million deal with Netflix to help pay their household expenses.

The Duke and Duchess, who have never produced a television show, will develop documentaries, films, scripted and kids' programming for Netflix.

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According to London's The Sun newspaper, a source said "Harry did not inform the Queen about the Netflix deal."

This is significant because Harry and Meghan are still relying on future King of England, Prince Charles, for their living expenses.

The couple has lived off Harry's father - and the kindness of others - ever since they quit royal life to become celebrities in America last year.

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So far, stardom has eluded them in America. A book about the Royal couple went directly into the sales bin at stores.

Palace officials plan to study the Netflix deal to determine whether Harry and Meghan will be cut off financially.

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The Queen is quite strict about Royals signing lucrative deals without her permission.

"Her view is simple, the Royals are not for sale and danger surrounds high profile roles outside of the institution itself," said the source.

The source added that Harry and Meghan knew any profit-making deals were "subject to discussion" by the palace.

The fact that they signed a deal without palace approval likely means they are affirming their independence from the Royal family.

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R. Kelly may file a federal lawsuit after a fellow inmate attacked him with a pen at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Chicago last week.

Kelly's attorneys will appeal to the government to release Kelly on home detention after he was nearly killed by another inmate in an unprovoked attack.

The 53-year-old "Trapped in the Closet" singer has not seen his attorneys in person since March.

Kelly's lawyers argue that he has been unable to prepare for his upcoming trial for nearly six months, due to restrictions amid the coronavirus pandemic that limits visitors to the jail.

Kelly's legal team may file a lawsuit citing the dangerous conditions at the jail after their client was attacked by a deranged inmate.

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The inmate, identified as Latin Kings gang member Jeremiah Farmer, allegedly attacked Kelly because he was upset over the lockdowns due to Kelly's fans protesting outside the jail.

In a handwritten letter to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, titled, "The Government Made Me Attack R. Kelly," Farmer said he was "forced" to beat the R&B crooner.

"Farmer, with nowhere else to turn for legal help, was forced to assault hip-hop R&B singer Robert Kelly in hopes of getting spotlight attention and world news notice to shed the light on the government corruption," Farmer wrote.

He continued: "Due to the most blatant government corruption in Farmer's case, and being in lockdown for R. Kelly protest, I physically beat Mr. Kelly in an attempt to shed media spotlight on Farmer's case to prove government corruption and helping Farmer's innocence to prevail."

The letter will likely be included in a lawsuit filed against the Federal Bureau of Prisons which runs the jail.

Kelly's attorneys will plead for his release before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday.

Kelly was indicted on federal charges of child p0rnography, trafficking, and aggravated sexual abuse. He was taken into federal custody in July 2019.

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A Black Atlanta woman signed up for Coronavirus vaccine clinical trials to ensure Black people are represented.

Ashley Nealy, 32, applied to participate in late-stage Covid-19 vaccine clinical trials by answering a social media ad looking for diverse volunteers.

Nealy tells Channel 2 Action News anchor Jovita Moore that she felt it was important to make sure the clinical trials were as diverse as possible.

"I actually wanted to do a clinical trial before I even saw the ad. I had registered at the website that Dr. Fauci mentioned, the Covid prevention network, and I never heard a call back. So whenever I saw the ad, I was like, let me just see if they'll accept me for this trial. So I signed up and less than two hours later actually got a call to participate in the trial," Nealy said.

Nealy said she was aware that there aren't enough Black volunteers for the trials and that there cannot be a vaccine product without more Black people. "So I figured that I can put my name in a hat and see if I can help be part of that," she said.

The vaccines contain RNA (Ribonucleic acid) that use specific instructions to tell human cells to produce antibodies against the coronavirus.

The RNA vaccine differs from normal vaccines that contain dead virus particles that trigger the immune system to produce antibodies against a specific pathogen.

RNA vaccines have never been approved for human use before because of the potential for something to go wrong.

What if human cells misread the mRNA instructions and go haywire inside the body?

Nealy says she participated in the trials knowing the RNA vaccine could negatively impact her health.

"This is so that I can help stop the pandemic and make sure that the vaccine works for Black Americans and everyone whenever it comes out," she told Moore.

"You know, so many people will say that they sort of have a mistrust," said Moore. "You're like a guinea pig. You don't know what's going to happen. You don't know what you're being injected with. What would you say to those people who have a real fear or maybe just a lack of interest right now?"

"Yeah, I will say I definitely understand," Nealy responded. "I know Black people in particular have a really long mistrust history with public health and with us being experimented on. And I understand that 100%. I will say if you are willing, and maybe if you're like a guinea pig like me to definitely participate, because we really can't move forward on this pandemic without knowing that a vaccine works for all of us."

Nealy says so far there have been no side effects.

"So actually, the next day after getting the vaccine, I did feel tired. I wasn't expecting to feel that fatigue. And I did have some body aches and sweating. And that was some of the things that they said you might experience if you have the vaccine."

Some volunteers received placebos while others were given the real vaccine.

"And then of course, they can't tell us but I'm pretty sure I did. And those are the only symptoms I had. They only lasted about a day and the next day I was fine," said Nealy.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has asked all 50 states to prepare for massive distributions of Covid-19 vaccines by late October or early November.

Further complicating the vaccination effort is the cold storage requirement and the fact that two vaccine doses will need to be given 2 weeks apart.

AFP via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has asked states to prepare for massive distributions of Covid-19 vaccines by early November.

Public health officials want the most vulnerable high-risk groups to get the Covid-19 vaccine as soon as late October or early November.

Officials agree that health agencies in all 50 states should "urgently" prepare for a complex effort to distribute the vaccines to "hundreds of millions" of Americans - despite the fact that the death rate is very low.

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The CDC sent guidance to every state on the same day President Trump told the Republican National Convention that a vaccine might be ready before the end of the year.

Over a dozen companies have accelerated clinical trials in a race to get their vaccines to market first. The usual safeguards have been waived in order to get the vaccines to market in a matter of months.

The FDA normally requires three years of clinical trials before a vaccine goes to market.

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The vaccine contains RNA (Ribonucleic acid) that are designed to alter the body's host cells to produce antibodies against the coronavirus.

Unlike normal vaccines, which contain DNA fragments of dead virus to produce antibodies, RNA vaccines are genetically engineered messenger RNA that contain specific directions to alter human DNA and tell it to create proteins, which in turn stimulates the cells to make antibodies.

RNA vaccines don't require dead pathogens to make antibodies. The human host's own genetic code is theoretically supposed to be altered (changed) by the RNA vaccine. RNA vaccines have been used on animals in veterinary medicine for years.

No RNA vaccines have ever been approved for human use.

Dr. Anthony Fauci and and Dr. Stephen Hahn, who heads the Food and Drug Administration, have said in interviews that RNA vaccines should be made readily available for certain groups, i.e. Black people, the elderly over 65, and "those incarcerated", before clinical trials have been completed.

Doctors and nurses on the frontlines will get the vaccines first, according to Fauci.

With so few Black people willing to step up and volunteer to be guinea pigs, the CDC's guidance acknowledged that its distribution plan is "hypothetical".

Dr. Saskia Popescu, an infection prevention epidemiologist based in Arizona, is concerned that the vaccine is highly politicized.

"It's hard not to see this as a push for a pre-election vaccine," he said.

Further complicating the vaccination effort is the cold storage requirement and the fact that two doses will need to be given 2 weeks apart.

"How are you going to make sure people get both [doses]?" said Dr. Cedric Dark, an emergency medicine physician at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas.

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President Donald Trump has blocked all evictions through the end of the year. Trump’s executive order gives the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) leeway to stop evictions by labeling evictions a health risk.

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The order helps people who fell behind on their rent because their income was impacted by the coronavirus.

Any landlord who violates the order will face stiff fines at a minimum of $100,000.

Under the executive order, the CDC can use its power as the country's health authority to block all evictions from taking place because of the risk of newly homeless people spreading the virus.

"I want to make it unmistakably clear that I'm protecting people from evictions," Trump said in a statement on Tuesday.

Trump took action after House Democrats and the White House failed to deliver a new stimulus package.

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The order left landlords and home builders angry and threatening to file federal lawsuits as soon as the moratorium takes effect.

Many landlords have already begun filing evictions around the country.

White House deputy press secretary Brian Morgenstern told reporters on Tuesday that the president's executive order signed Tuesday will help millions of Americans stay in their homes.

"Today's announcement means that people struggling to pay rent due to the coronavirus will not have to worry about being evicted and risk further spreading, spreading of, or exposure to the disease due to economic hardship," he said. "The administration has also made funds available to alleviate any economic impact to tenants, landlords, and property owners."

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An ex-girlfriend of conservative activist Kingface claims he has AIDS and he allegedly transmitted the virus to her.

She claims she reported him to the health department in November after learning he had unprotected sex with multiple women.

The community activist and Trump supporter, real name Larry Henry, is reportedly in a coma in a New York City hospital. A GoFundMe account raised $69,000 of a $100,000 goal to pay for his hospital expenses.

In a video livestream titled "Surviving Kingface," the woman said she met Kingface on March 13, 2019, and shortly after having sex with him, she began experiencing flu-like symptoms.

She said she tested positive for HIV after experiencing a high fever, hives, and other symptoms.

The woman said she spoke with multiple women who had allegedly unprotected sex with Kingface, who is married.

She said the women are also in relationships with other people and may have unknowingly transmitted the virus to their partners.

"We all believed him. We all loved him. We all still love him," she said.
 

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Musician Eddy Grant is suing President Donald Trump for using his 1982 hit song "Electric Avenue" during a campaign video clip.

The video features an animated train with Trump's campaign logo speeding through a town while Biden follows along in a railroad handcar.

Grant's song plays throughout the duration of the video, which ends with letters spelling out "Biden Train" falling off the screen.

"Electric Avenue" plays in the video clip, which Trump tweeted last month. The video clip garnered 13 million views through Tuesday afternoon.

The campaign removed the video, but the 72-year-old Guyanese-British singer-songwriter filed a lawsuit Tuesday, citing Trump for "continued to willfully and wrongfully infringing Plaintiffs' copyrights."

Grant's lawyer noted "substantial damage and irreparable harm has occurred and will continue to occur to my client and his reputation as an artist not affiliated in any way with your campaign."

The Trump campaign has received warnings and legal action after multiple demands to stop using copyrighted music by other musicians in his campaign rallies.