Tom Brenner/Getty Images

Brad Parscale, former campaign manager for President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election, was hospitalized after he threatened to harm himself on Sunday.

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida responded to a 911 call from Parscale's wife, Candice, who said Parscale was armed and threatened suicide. When police arrived on the scene in the affluent Seven Isles community, Parscale reportedly "barricaded" himself inside his home.

Fort Lauderdale Police Chief Karen Dietrich said Parscale was involuntarily committed to a psych ward under Florida's Baker Act, which allows police to commit people who are a danger to themselves or others.

She said he did not threaten police and he went "willingly" with police.

"We went out and it was very short. We went and got him help," Dietrich said, according to the South Florida Sun Sentinel.

Parscale's fall from grace began in June when he was outwitted by TikTok teenagers who registered online by the thousands to attend Trump's campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Parscale embarrassed and humiliated his boss when he tweeted that he had received over 1 million requests for tickets to the Tulsa rally, but more than half the seats were empty at the 19,000-seat arena.

The teens took to TikTok to brag that they intentionally registered thousands of tickets online so Trump's supporters couldn't get tickets.

Parscale was also investigated for allegedly "mismanaging" over $40 million in Trump campaign funds.

More than $800,000 was spent on "boosting" Parscale's social media pages, and $39 million was transferred to two companies owned by Parscale.

On July 15, Trump tweeted that Parscale was demoted and would be replaced by Bill Stepien, but Parscale would continue to advise the campaign.

Parscale is currently serving as senior adviser for data and digital operations for Trump's 2020 presidential re-election campaign.

AFP via Getty Images

Florida will lift all coronavirus restrictions on restaurants and bars a day after President Donald Trump spoke to thousands of supporters at his campaign rally in Jacksonville on Thursday.

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis says he will prohibit local governments from closing businesses or imposing restrictions without justification.

The move comes after the CDC updated statistics that prove the Covid-19 death rate has declined to less than 99.8%.

"There will not be limitations from the state of Florida," DeSantis said during a press conference Friday. "I think this will be very, very important to the industry. Some of the local [governments] can do reasonable regulations, but you can't say no after six months and just have people twisting in the wind."

DeSantis said if local officials want to impose restrictions on residents, they'd better show unaltered economic and health justifications.

"We're not closing anything moving forward. We have the tools in place," DeSantis said.

Photo may have been deleted

Twitter/@Calltcooks

NBA coaches and players are banding together once again to help former NBA star Delonte West after a new viral photo shows him panhandling for money on the side of a busy roadway in Dallas.

On Sept. 22, Twitter user @Calltcooks uploaded a photo that showed a bedraggled West wearing a white, loose-fitting long sleeved shirt and grey jogging pants.

He was holding a cardboard sign, begging for money. @Calltcooks captioned the image: "Got damn Delonte West."

The 37-year-old former shooting guard once played alongside LeBron James on the Cleveland Cavaliers team. They fell out after gossip blogs linked West with James' mother, Gloria James, in a relationship.

West played 8 seasons in the NBA. He last played for the Boston Celtics in 2012, but he was waived for arguing with teammates.

After playing in the NBA's D-league and for a China team, West returned to the U.S. and fell on hard times after he began drinking and allegedly abusing drugs, which exacerbated his mental health problems.

At the peak of his career, West purchased homes for his parents and helped family members financially, but he received little financial help after he fell on hard times.

Viral photos and videos over the years have portrayed West as homeless and a drug addict. West's former coach Doc Rivers and the Players Association tried to help him after he was beaten bloody by a homeless man in January.

Several years ago, West's brother, Dmitri, revealed his brother was diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

"Delonte West is not crazy, he is not on drugs. I don't know what exactly is going on in his mind but I can tell you that he is safe and he's doing OK. My family are trying to get him the best professional help that's out there, the best that they can afford."

The NBA has once again offered its resources to help West, theGRIO reported.
 

Copyright Disclaimer: I do not own the rights to the photograph(s) or video(s) used in this post. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" of photographs for purposes such as parody, criticism, commentary, news reporting, education, and research.

Photo may have been deleted

Screengrab: YouTube

An 89-year-old pizza delivery man was tipped over $12,000 cash by a Utah couple who started a fundraiser for him on TikTok.

Derlin Newey was speechless when TikTok star Carlos Valdez and his wife arrived at his home to personally deliver the money.

"I don't know what to say," Newey cried after opening the envelope stuffed with cash.

Newey has been working about 30-hours a week delivering pizzas for Papa John's to pay the bills his social security benefits don't cover.

Customers love him because he is so polite. They often ask for him by name.

Valdez and his wife, who have a huge following on TikTok, record and share Derlin's deliveries on the video streaming network.

Their followers banded together to raise the money for Newey.
 

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Charles Barkley suggests Breonna Taylor would still be alive if she had better judgment when choosing boyfriends.

The NBA legend faced public backlash on Thursday night when he said on "Inside the NBA" that "we do have to take into account that her boyfriend did shoot at the cops and shot a cop."

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Barkley said Kenneth Walker's alleged drug dealings put Taylor in direct danger. Taylor, 26, was killed on March 13 when three plainclothes police served a no-knock warrant at her apartment looking for an ex-boyfriend, who was already in jail on drug charges.

Walker shot at the intruders, striking one officer in the thigh. The cops returned fire, killing Taylor who was standing in a hallway.

Nikki Nelson/ WENN

"So, like I said, even though I'm really sad she lost her life, I don't think this is something we can put in the same situation as George Floyd or Ahmaud Arbery," Barkley said, referring to unarmed Black men who were killed by police in America.

A witness told a Grand Jury this week that the officers identified themselves before taking the apartment door down. But Taylor and Walker, who were in bed when the police beat on their door, probably did not know they were officers.

Twitter users disagreed with Barkley's assessment.

@ItsaLearning tweeted:

"No, #charlesbarkley, he shot at intruders. These intruders, who happened to be Police, did not identify themselves. He had every right to defend himself and Breonna against whoever was breaking into his house unannounced."

And @ChatonsWorld wrote:

"He's misinformed. Her boyfriend shot at intruders. Nobody knew they were the police because they didn't announce themselves. Witnessing what happens when everybody thinks they need to share their opinion..."

Barkley also called for police reforms over defunding the police, since the Black community depends on the police for their safety.

"Who are black people supposed to call Ghost Busters when we have crime in our neighborhood? We need to stop the defund or abolish the police crap," he said.

A Grand Jury returned an indictment against one of the officers, Brett Hankison, who lost his job after the shooting. There were no charges directly related to Taylor's death.

On Thursday, Majic 107.5 host Ryan Cameron took phone calls from outraged listeners in Atlanta, who commented on the Louisville Metro Police Department "losing" the original no-knock warrant that set the tragedy in motion.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stopped by the Supreme Court to pay their respects to former Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died after a prolonged battle with pancreatic cancer.

Trump and Ginsburg's relationship was tense and she reportedly said he would not complete his first term in office while she was alive.

Photo may have been deleted

Getty Images

Trump and his wife donned cloth face coverings as they stood at the top of the steps flanking Ginsburg's flag-draped coffin, their heads bowed in prayer on Thursday morning.

Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

But the somber moment was punctuated by booing and jeering from thousands of mourners who lined up to view Ginsburg's casket.

"Honor her wish!" they yelled, in reference to the alleged deathbed statement asking to delay filling her seat until 2021.

"My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed," Ginsburg allegedly told her grand daughter.

"Vote him out," the crowd chanted. There were also shouts of "Breonna Taylor," in reference to the 29-year-old EMT who was killed when plainclothes officers served a drug warrant at her apartment on March 13.

One officer was charged with shooting into a nearby apartment. But there were no charges directly related to Breonna's death.

The Grand Jury's decision sparked renewed rioting and violence in the streets of Louisville, Kentucky on Wednesday. Two Louisville police officers were wounded by gunfire. One man is in custody. The two officers are expected to survive.

Meanwhile, President Trump will announce his Supreme Court pick on Saturday. Topping the list is Amy Coney Barrett, a circuit judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in New Orleans, and a devout Catholic.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

The 48-year-old married mom of two was appointed to the bench by Trump in 2017.

Vice President Mike Pence told ABC News Wednesday that he considers Barrett's strong religious values an asset, rather than a liability.

Trump has the 50 Senate votes he needs to confirm his Supreme Court pick, meaning Ginsburg's seat will be filled before the elections in November.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Andrè Taylor made national headlines when he was hired as Seattle, Washington's new $150,000-a-year "street czar" and community liaison.

Taylor, 52, was a Las Vegas pimp who recruited girls as young as 16 for wealthy clients. He got one girl pregnant and faced seven prostitution-related charges in 2000.

Cheryl Davis, 20 at the time, testified in open court that she miscarried his baby in jail while he lived the high life off of the money she earned.

She said she moved into his $300,000 home with two other prostitutes just after she turned 18.

Taylor was also accused of transporting a minor across state lines. He was sentenced to serve 5-and-a-half years in prison, but only served one year.

The prostitution business was lucrative for Taylor, who was born to a prostitute mom and pimp dad. He wore hand-tailored Versace suits, a $90k Rolex and expensive alligator shoes, according to DailyMail.com.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Taylor, pictured as a young man with his pimp father, Mel Taylor, once said he learned the pimp trade from his father after he was "born from the womb of a prostitute from the seed of a pimp."

In the 1999 documentary "American Pimp", Taylor revealed that he believed "prostitution cuts down on rape" and that the "best pimps are the best men, men of character and substance."

But Taylor, who was previously known by his street name "Gorgeous Dre", has since turned his life around.

He founded a nonprofit foundation after his brother, Che, was fatally shot. And he offers $500 an hour life coaching sessions.

Taylor is married to Athena, his wife of 22 years. He has a son who graduated from Yale University and a daughter who graduated from UCLA.

Alika Jenner/Getty Images

On July 27, Taylor signed a $150,000-a-year deal with Mayor Jenny Durkan's office to work as a community liaison.

As part of his $12,000-a-month deal, Taylor will provide recommendations to the city on de-escalation strategies between police and local residents, community engagement, and alternatives to policing in the aftermath of multiple killings of Black men and women by police.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

His new title of "street czar" was his idea, according to the Seattle Times.

He told the news outlet he was the best man for the job because "not too many people can go talk to gangbangers in their territory, and then go talk to the government in their territory."

Taylor said he has a "particular genius in a particular area" and can talk to "gang members, pimps and prostitutes" who "won't sit down with anybody else," reported KOMO News.

"Black people as a whole have not been in a place to be compensated for their genius or their work for a very, very long time," he said.

Mayor Jenny Durkan's office did not immediately return DailyMail.com's request for comment but she told the Seattle Times the partnership would "help de-escalate the ongoing situation" between police and criminals by allowing the city to tap into Taylor's "lived experience with the criminal legal system".

Bettmann via Getty Images

American football legend Gale Sayers has died of natural causes. He was 77.

The Chicago Bears star and Hall of Fame running back was nicknamed "Kansas Comet" for his electrifying speed. Sayers played his entire NFL career - 6 years - with the Bears.

Sayers set an NFL record in his first season as a professional by scoring 22 touchdowns, including six in a single game.

In 1967, Sayers and Bears teammate Brian Piccolo became the first interracial roommates in the NFL. Piccolo was later diagnosed with metastatic cancer and he passed away in 1970.

Sayers' and Piccolo's enduring friendship was documented in a made-for-TV movie, Brian's Song, with Sayers portrayed by Billy Dee Williams in the 1971 original and by Mekhi Phifer in the 2001 remake.

Tiffany Rose/WireImage

In March 2017, Sayers' second wife, Ardythe Bullard, announced he had been diagnosed with dementia four years prior. She stated that a Mayo Clinic doctor confirmed his dementia was likely caused by physical contact during his brief football career.

"It wasn't so much getting hit in the head," she said. "It's just the shaking of the brain when they took him down with the force they play the game in."

Hall of Fame President & CEO David Baker said in a statement, "All those who love the game of football mourn the loss of one of the greatest to ever play this Game with the passing of Chicago Bears legend Gale Sayers. He was the very essence of a team player - quiet, unassuming and always ready to compliment a teammate for a key block. Gale was an extraordinary man who overcame a great deal of adversity during his NFL career and life."

Photo may have been deleted

Family handout

Only one out of three Louisville police officers was charged in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

The three officers were serving a no-knock drug warrant at Taylor's apartment on March 13 when Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire on them, hitting one of the cops in the thigh.

The officers returned fire, killing Taylor, who was shot multiple times. The Grand Jury heard from a witness who said the officers announced themselves before breaching the front door and entering the apartment.

They also heard that Taylor was not killed in her bed as was originally reported by the news media. She was standing in a hallway when she was fatally shot 5 times.

Photo may have been deleted

Louisville Metro PD

Brett Hankison (pictured left), who was fired in June, was charged with three felony counts of wanton endangerment. Bail was set at $15,000 and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Two other officers involved in the shooting, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly (center) and Detective Myles Cosgrove (right), were justified in their use of force, state Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a press conference Wednesday.

Louisville police were under a state of emergency before a Grand Jury announced the single indictment on Wednesday.

In anticipation of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer invoked a 72-hour curfew, effective Wednesday night, from 9 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

Last week, Fischer announced the city agreed to a $12 million with Taylor's family that included police reforms.

Arkadiusz Wargu?a via Getty Images

In an unprecedented monetary overhaul, the Federal Reserve is preparing to deposit "digital dollars" directly to every American.

According to Zerohedge, the Fed is preparing to "radically overhaul" its monetary system to reduce inflation and stimulate the economy amid pandemic shutdowns.

While the Democrats and Republicans bicker over how many more trillions to pay into another pandemic relief package, the Fed is proposing a monetary tool that they call recession insurance bonds, which will be wired instantly to Americans.

The Fed would activate a lump sum that would be divided equally and distributed to households in a recession, according to Zerohedge.

BAY ISMOYO/AFP via Getty Images

The money would come from insurance bonds purchased by the Fed on the open market. The digital dollars would be deposited directly into household apps.

"It took Congress too long to get money to people, and it's too clunky," said former Fed official Simon Potter.

"The Fed could buy the bonds quickly without going to the private market. On March 15 they could have said interest rates are now at zero, we're activating X amount of the bonds, and we'll be tracking the unemployment rate -- if it increases above this level, we'll buy more [bonds]."

During a speech to the Chicago Payment Symposium on Wednesday, Cleveland Fed president Loretta Mester said, "legislation has proposed that each American have an account at the Fed in which digital dollars could be deposited, as liabilities of the Federal Reserve Banks, which could be used for emergency payments."

Sandra Rose/Sandrarose.com

But there's a catch. According to Zerohedge, the Fed giveth and the Fed taketh away (you drug dealers will want to pay attention to this part).

Once physically currency is replaced by digital dollars, the Fed would then be able to scrap "anonymous" physical currency entirely, and track every single banknote from its "creation" all though the various transactions that take place during its lifetime. And, eventually, the Fed could remotely "destroy" said digital currency when it so decides.*

Oh, and say goodbye to your banks, as the Fed would both provide loans to consumers and directly deposit funds into their accounts, effectively making the entire traditional banking system obsolete.*

*(bold emphasis mine)