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Friends and family are mourning loss of a 36-year-old Southwest Airlines flight attendant who died from COVID-19.

Maurice "Reggie" Shepperton spent 30 days in a Las Vegas ICU before succumbing to the coronavirus "Delta variant".

His mother, Dawn Shepperson, told USA TODAY that her son was "fully vaccinated" when he died Tuesday, Aug. 10.

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Dawn said he drove himself to a Las Vegas hospital after experiencing breathing difficulties. He spent the next several weeks on a ventilator before passing away.

"It hurt me so bad because it was just so quick. I didn't have time to really even acknowledge what is going on. This is mind-blowing. It's not real. It's not real. It's not real."

In June, Shepperson took his mother with him on a work trip to Hawaii. Dawn said he tested positive for Covid-19 in July.

The outgoing flight attendant was nicknamed "Skittles" because of the vibrant colored pants he loved to wear.

Shepperson, a native New Yorker based in Las Vegas, took all precautions to protect himself from the virus.

He wore a face mask, washed his hands frequently, and wiped down all surfaces in hotel rooms, said Marcia Hildreth, a Southwest flight attendant who was Shepperson's best friend.

Hildreth created a GoFundMe to raise funds for his funeral expenses. Over $13,700 has been raised as of Sunday, Aug. 15.

Southwest Airlines is one of 3 major airlines that do not require mandatory vaccines for employees.

However, friends say Shepperson took the shots because he had underlying medical conditions that made him high-risk if he contracted the virus.

According to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) co-managed by the CDC, at least 125,000 fully vaccinated people have tested positive for Covid-19. Over 12,000 deaths have been reported.

The Association of Flight Attendants (CWA) estimates that 4,000 flight attendants in the U.S. tested positive for the coronavirus and 20 have died.

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Candace Owens is among millions of Americans who don't trust Dr. Anthony Fauci after he admitted funding coronavirus research in Wuhan, China.

The conservative author says she "trusts her gut" more than she does the White House's infectious disease expert, Eurweb.com reports.

"I still have not received the COVID-19 vaccine and have not demanded that any of my employees get it either," Owens wrote in a Facebook post Sunday.

"I am proud that I committed myself to standing firm against the bribery, media propaganda, coercion, celebrity-peer pressure campaign, plus censorship. I made a personal decision for me and my family.

"It is isn't easy to swim against such a polluted current but here I am. I trust my gut much more than trust Dr. Fauci. May we all do what we feel in our hearts is right, unabashedly."

Meanwhile, Fauci said "everyone" will eventually need a third mRNA vaccine "booster" shot because the first two shots will decrease in efficacy.

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"Things are going to get worse," Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC co-anchor Jonathan Karl on "This Week."

Fauci reluctantly admitted the country is close to herd immunity and there won't be any more lockdowns.

"I don't think we're gonna see lockdowns. I think we have enough of the percentage of people in the country — not enough to crush the outbreak — but I believe enough to not allow us to get into the situation we were in last winter."

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized a third coronavirus mRNA injection for "immunocompromised" people beginning on Thursday, Aug. 12.

The federal health agency expanded emergency use for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna mRNA to administer third "booster" shots to people with compromised or weak immunity.

The shots are authorized for people who received the first two injections and are considered immunocompromised due to cancer treatment, autoimmune disorders, HIV or other conditions that weaken the immune system.

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Americans with weak or compromised immunity are allowed to get a third coronavirus vaccine beginning on Thursday, Aug. 12.
 
ALSO READ: Should You Get a Third Vaccine Shot? The CDC Says Not Yet
 
Previously, health experts at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta and the World Health Organization (WHO) said third boosters shots were not necessary.

However, Pfizer and Moderna claim third shots are needed because the first 2 injections are "wearing off" and antibody levels are decreasing among the fully vaccinated population.

Neither Pfizer nor Modern vaccines prevent the spread of the virus or prevent the fully vaccinated from contracting the virus.

Pfizer and Moderna have applied to the FDA for full approval of their vaccines.

About 50% of the U.S. population have been fully vaccinated.

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Six members of the same church in Florida died within 10 days after testing positive for Covid-19, the pastor says.

Rev. George Davis of the Impact Church in Jacksonville said the deaths of his members have "ripped out hearts apart.

Davis held a Covid-19 vaccination clinic at his church on Sunday.

"We've had now six members of our church over the course of a couple weeks now that have passed away from Covid," Davis said in a livestream. "It has just absolutely ripped our hearts apart."

He said none of the victims were vaccinated, and four were "healthy" and under the age of 35.

"All I know is my heart's passion is to help people that I'm called to serve, and do whatever I can to help see to it that they are in a healthier place," he told NBC affiliate WFLA of Tampa.

About 49.6 percent of Florida's population has been fully vaccinated, according to NBC's vaccination tracker.

Covid-19 mainly affects the elderly, obese, people who smoke, and people with underlying medical conditions such as cardiac and respiratory problems, and diabetes.
 
READ ALSO: Study: Obese People are more at risk of dying from Covid-19
 
Studies have shown people with pre-existing or undiagnosed medical conditions are likely to have increased ACE2 enzymes, which the coronavirus uses to enter human cells.
 

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The World Health Organization (WHO) issued a warning against mixing coronavirus vaccines as Delta variant cases surge.

"It's a little bit of a dangerous trend here," said chief scientist for the World Health Organization Soumya Swaminathan.

"It will be a chaotic situation in countries if citizens start deciding when and who will be taking a second, a third and a fourth dose."

The WHO's warning came too late for actor and former Mr. Universe "Iron" Mike Mitchell.

The 65-year-old "Braveheart" and "Gladiator" actor received two "inactivated virus" Sinovac injections followed by a Pfizer BioNTech mRNA "booster" shot days before he died from an apparent cardiac arrest.

He was found dead in a marina cabin near his house boat in Turkey on July 22.

Mitchell received his first experimental Sinovac Coronavac injection on February 22, according to screenshots of his Facebook page.

Mitchell's Facebook page was scrubbed clean after his death.

Mitchell received the second Sinovac injection on March 20. He reported no apparent adverse effects, according to Facebook posts in which he urged his followers to get the shots.

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After his second shot, Mitchell shared a meme of Charlie Brown that said "Good grief, just wear the mask."

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He was found dead the day after he received the third Pfizer booster shot.

Sinovac is approved by WHO and administered everywhere except the United States, Russia and Western Europe, according to Deadline.com.

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As Dr. Anthony Fauci and the CDC report "surging" coronavirus "variant" cases, pharmaceutical companies urge a third mRNA vaccine "booster" shot.

Pfizer-BioNTech is projected to earn $30 billion from vaccines in 2021.

Pfizer-BioNTech submitted a request to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for a third vaccination booster shot.

The FDA is already in the process of reviewing Pfizer-BioNTech's request for full approval of its emergency authorized vaccines.

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla claims that a third booster shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 mRNA vaccine will be needed as the Delta and Lambda variants continue to surge across the US.

Bourla claims the immunity provided by the first two mRNA injections will wear off after 6 months.

However, natural God-given immunity typically lasts a lifetime. Natural immunity occurs after a virus enters the body (with or without symptoms).

When healthy, the natural immune system detects and responds to invading virus and kills the pathogens before the organisms can multiply in the body.
 
READ ALSO: CDC Investigates heart inflammation in young people who got Covid-19 vaccine
 
Ugur Sahin, CEO of Pfizer's German partner BioNTech, recently stated that he's not calling for a third booster shot just yet.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) also said a third booster shot is not needed.

Pfizer said Wednesday it will require all of its U.S. employees and contractors to become fully vaccinated or participate in weekly rapid Covid testing.

Question: If you are fully vaccinated, do you plan to take the third booster shot?

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A PSA featuring an Arkansas street hustler telling people to get vaccinated is going viral.

The PSA, commissioned by the Arkansas Dept. of Health, features street entrepreneur Richard Johnson telling people to get the vaccines.

About 68% of Americans have at least one dose of mRNA vaccine in their arms. Federal, state and local governments are pulling out all the stops to get hesitant Americans to roll up their sleeves.
 
READ ALSO: Women claim Pfizer mRNA vaccines increased their breast size
 
In the video, Johnson is seen leaning on a car while passionately telling viewers to get the vaccine.

He said the pandemic affected his "lifestyle" and impacted his revenue stream while he (and his customers) were on lockdown.

"During the pandemic, my lifestyle drastically changed. My income came to a screeching halt. You have to understand, I'm a hustler. I'm a legit entrepreneur. I sell things. I come in contact with people all the time. I have to stay safe."

Johnson fears another lockdown will crush his successful street sales.

"If you live the type of lifestyle that I live, if you out here in the streets and you hustling [as] an entrepreneur like me, then why not do it safely? So I want everybody to take this seriously. Take a shot at staying healthy. Get the vaccine."

Other government agencies have taken to using rappers and unsavory characters to speak to Black people on their level to decrease vaccine hesitancy.

Watch the PSA below.
 

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Last week, the Biden administration approved $100 payments to people who take the Covid-19 mRNA vaccines.

Then Walmart announced it was offering $150 to employees who were hesitant about taking the injections.

That led one blog to speculate that "the bribes are increasing right on schedule. In 1 month, holdouts should get 4 digits."

"And since Wall Street is all about following "thought leaders" we expect that within 48 hours, most financial companies will piggyback and also offer similar cash bribes to their unjabbed employees. At that point, employee envy will emerge and most US companies will be met with social pressure to do the same. And then there is the question of why aren't these bribes retroactive: surely some 165 million Americans feel very stupid right now for not waiting a few months and getting one month's rent for free."

That prediction came to fruition. According to Bloomberg, Vanguard is offering $1,000 to employees who get vaccinated by October.

A Vanguard spokeswoman confirmed the asset management company is offering $1,000 as an "incentive" to employees who are still holding out.

Zerohedge notes that the offer is not retroactive to those employees who dutifully took the shots already.

"At that point, employee envy will emerge and most US companies will be met with social pressure to do the same. And then there is the question of why aren't these bribes retroactive: surely some 165 million Americans feel very stupid right now for not waiting a few months and getting one month's rent for free."

Question: Would you be upset if you are fully vaccinated, but your colleague receives $1,000 for getting the vax?

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The Biden administration is offering $100 to Americans who get vaccinated, as the CDC vaccine rollout hits a brick wall.

The $100 payments can be paid for with the $350 billion in aid granted to state, local, territorial and tribal governments under the American Rescue Plan Act.

"Throughout America's vaccination efforts, we have seen that financial incentives serve as a motivating factor for some people to get vaccinated," the White House said on Thursday.
 
READ ALSO: Biden: 'You're not going to get Covid if you have these vaccinations'

The Biden administration also confirmed Pres. Joe Biden will require all federal government employees and onsite contractors to provide proof of vaccination or take weekly PCR tests.

"After months and months of cases going down, we're seeing a spike in COVID cases. Why? Because of this new form, this new variant called the delta variant," Biden said on Thursday.

The United States Postal Service has declined to comply with Biden's vaccine mandate.

The American Postal Workers Union that represents over 200,000 U.S. Postal Service employees, released a statement Wednesday declaring it's not the federal government's job to force vaccines on Americans.

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Women who received the Pfizer mRNA vaccine are reporting an unexpected side effect that may boost mammogram appointments in America.

The women claim the Pfizer injections increased their breast size and they have dubbed the side effect the "Pfizer boob job."

According to Australian Department of Health, increased breast size and inflamed lymph nodes are a less common side effect of the vaccinations.

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Doctors in the U.S. have reported an increase in newly vaccinated women making mammogram appointments due to swollen breasts.

Dr. Laura Esserman, director of University of California San Francisco’s Breast Care Center, said women were confusing swollen lymph nodes after the vaccine for signs of cancer.

Dr. Esserman said "hundreds of thousands of women" will be affected by the rare side effect.

"I'm sure hundreds of thousands of women will be affected by this for sure," Dr. Esserman told ABC7 Chicago.