Photo may have been deleted

Twitter

Rep. Park Cannon, the Georgia lawmaker who was dragged out of the Capitol building for knocking on Gov. Brian Kemp's door, will not be charged.

Cannon was arrested on March 25 and dragged to the Fulton County (Atlanta) Jail after she knocked on Kemp's door while he signed the voter ID bill into law.

The election bill requires voter ID to request and submit absentee ballots, limits the number of ballot drop boxes, and allows the Georgia State Elections Board to take over county elections boards if there are problems with ballot counting.

Cannon's arrest sparked outrage on social media when video of her arrest went viral.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that she will not pursue charges and the case is closed.

Willis said the police officers may have found her behavior annoying," but it did not justify putting together a grand jury.

Cannon faced charges of felony obstruction and disrupting the General Assembly session. If found guilty, she faced up to high years in jail.

"My experience was painful, both physically and emotionally, but today I stand before you to say as horrible as that experience was... I believe the governor signing into law the most comprehensive voter suppression bill in the country is a far more serious crime," Cannon said at a rally last week.

Photo may have been deleted

Twitter.com

Midwin Charles, the CNN and MSNBC legal analyst passed away after getting the Covid-19 mRNA vaccine. She was 47.

Charles died on Tuesday, April 6, her family confirmed in a statement on social media. The family did not disclose the cause or manner of her death.

On March 1, Charles announced she had received the first dose of the experimental Covid-19 mRNA vaccine.

Charles died days after she would have received her second dose of the gene therapy vaccine.

She told her followers she had preexisting medical conditions, including asthma and a severe peanut allergy.

"Just got vaccinated (qualified because of my asthma) at a FEMA center. Everyone at the site is in uniform. It's good to see our service men and women! Process was organized, efficient, and everyone is kind and in a good mood. Let’s do this!"

Photo may have been deleted

In a follow-up tweet, she wrote:

"I have a death causing allergy to peanuts and wanted to have my Epi pen with me when I got vaccinated in case I went into anaphylaxis shock. Turns out my "insurance" wouldn't cover it and it's $387????"

Charles reported "soreness" at the injection site that resolved two days later.

Tributes continue to pour in on social media for the Haitian-born defense attorney, who used her social media presence to promote the vaccine.

Gilbert Carrasquillo/Getty Images

Midwin Charles, a prominent defense attorney and legal analyst for CNN and MSNBC, died suddenly at age 47.

Charles' family announced her untimely death in a post on her Instagram page. She passed away on Tuesday.

"It is with a profoundly heavy heart and the deepest sadness that we announce the untimely passing of our beloved Midwin Charles. She was known to many as a legal commentator on television, but to us she was a devoted daughter, sister, aunt, niece and cousin."

Johnny Nunez/Getty Images

Now Charles' Instagram followers wonder if her death is linked to the experimental mRNA vaccine she received on March 1.

In a tweet on March 1, Charles complained about the high cost of her Epi-pen which is not covered by insurance.

Charles said she had a severe peanut allergy and she brought along an Epi-pen in case she suffered an anaphylactic shock to the mRNA injection.

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Charles would have received her second dose around three or 4 weeks after her first shot -- or right before she died.

In a post dated March 15, Charles shared an image of her elderly mother getting the mRNA injection.

She captioned the image: "Mom got the vaccine while praying to the Lord! I'm sooooo happy! This took weeks of convincing by the way. It's gon be a hot elderly girl summer!"

Charles' followers reacted angrily after her sudden death.

One follower wrote: "I pray to God it doesn't kill her mom like it did her."

Another IG user wrote: "Now she knows why momma was afraid."

And a third user wrote: "You should have never convinced your mom to take this experimental drug smh!"
 

Getty Images

NBA legend Shaquille O'Neal surprised a stranger by paying off his engagement ring debt while shopping in a jewelry store.

Shaq, 49, was shopping at a Zales jewelry store in Atlanta, Georgia when he spotted a young man paying down on a lay-away engagement ring. Shaq handed the salesman his credit card after realizing the guy was struggling to pay off the debt.

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

The 7-foot-1-inch sports analyst was in the store shopping for earrings for his girlfriend, Laticia Rolle.

He shared the story during his TV show NBA on TNT on Tuesday night, April 6, and now video of his generosity has gone viral.

"I seen the guy come in - he was just so shy," Shaq said. "He was saying, 'Hey, how much do I owe to pay off my ring?' And I was like, 'My man, how much is the ring?' I'm not going to say the amount, but it's not a lot for me. I was like, 'You know what? Tell your girlfriend I got her. I'll take care of it'. At first, he didn't want to take it. He was like, 'Man, I can't do that'. I said, 'Don't worry about it. I do it all the time. I'm just trying to make people smile, that's all'."

John Sciulli/WireImage

Shaq, who has more money than he can spend, also paid off a family's bill at a furniture store.

"This lady, she had an autistic daughter, and she was also looking to pay for some furniture and I just took care of her. I'm into making people happy. Whenever I leave the house, I just try to do a good deed."

In 2019, Shaq surprised a young fan by purchasing custom shoes and sneakers because the teen's mother couldn't afford shoes in his size.

Watch the video below.
 

Saul Loeb-Pool/Getty Images

Matt Gaetz reportedly asked the White House for a blanket presidential pardon ahead of a federal investigation into sex trafficking allegations.

Gaetz is a Republican U.S. representative for Florida's 1st congressional district. The 38-year-old politician is being investigated by the U.S. Justice Department for his relationship with a 17-year-old girl.

He reportedly paid for the girl to travel across state lines. The age of consent varies in many states.

Drew Angerer/GettyImages

Gaetz reportedly asked former President Donald Trump to pardon him in advance of possible charges for misconduct and trafficking.

He proposed to his fiancee in December at Trump's Florida resort. He reportedly bragged that the former president insisted on hosting the wedding.

Gaetz's request was ultimately rejected, according to multiple reports.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gaetz alleged he was extorted by a New York Times reporter before the newspaper published the article about his relationship.

He denied asking Trump for a preemptive presidential pardon, according to POLITICO.

"The recent false allegations against me are not something I've ever discussed with Trump, pardons or otherwise," he told POLITICO.

Trump issued dozens of pardons in his final days as president. Pardons went to his former advisor Steve Bannon and rappers Lil Wayne and Kodak Black.

BACKGRID

DMX is still on life support at a White Plains, NY hospital after suffering a heart attack following an apparent drug overdose last week.

According to his manager, DMX tested positive for the coronavirus after he was admitted to the ICU.

It isn't clear if he has an active infection or if he tested positive for Covid-19 antibodies. Testing positive for antibodies means he was exposed to the virus previously.

BlayzenPhotos / BACKGRID

The 50-year-old rapper, born Earl Simmons, is reportedly lying in a "vegetative state" in an intensive care unit on Friday night. His brain scans show very little activity and he is not expected to recover.

TMZ reports that his brain was deprived of oxygen for 30 minutes. But he would be dead if that was the case. No human can survive without oxygen for 30 minutes.

Only one visitor is allowed to visit DMX in the ICU. Visitors include his mother, fiancee, and some of his 15 children.

Most patients who test positive for the coronavirus aren't allowed visitors at all -- even if they are in private rooms.

Covid-19 causes death in less than 1% of people who contract the virus. The majority of deaths are among people over 65. Other factors include preexisting medical conditions, cardiac problems, respiratory disorders, obesity, diabetes, smokers and those who are HIV positive.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Mystery surrounds a Green Bay music teacher who died from "natural causes" at age 40, according to her obituary.

Sara Holub, a high school choir director, competed twice on "Jeopardy!" and she was named 2021 Teacher of Distinction.

She won $10,000 for making it to Jeopardy!'s semifinals, as well as a $2,500 grant for her classroom. She used the grant money to buy microphones for her students.

According to her obituary, Holub died from "natural causes." No other information was given -- such as a preexisting medical condition or a terminal illness.

The term "natural causes" usually denotes a patient who is expected to die. Someone who dies from natural causes does not require an autopsy.

However, friends say Holub was in good health before she died.

Holub's obituary does not mention that she received a dose of experimental mRNA injection four days before she died.

News articles that reported her death also do not mention that she received an mRNA injection just days before she passed.

Facebook removed a post that featured a photo showing Holub holding an "I was vaccinated" sticker on March 22.

She seemed relieved to receive the injection. Holub captioned the photo: "It's been a ridiculous year, but better days are coming!"

The post shows she received the injection at Prevea Health in Wisconsin. It isn't clear if she received the Moderna, Pfizer, or Johnson & Johnson injections.

Leon Bennett/Getty Images

Tip "T.I." Harris and his wife Tameka Harris released a statement in response to new allegations of misconduct.

The reality TV couple released a statement through their attorney, Steve Sadow, on Tuesday, April 6.

Sadow is still waiting to attack the integrity of the women -- once their names are revealed.

"The Harrises are still waiting for the accusers to reveal themselves publicly," Sadow told Billboard. "By continuing to hide behind anonymous allegations, the unnamed accusers effectively render themselves not credible and unworthy of belief. We say: Let the light shine on their identities so we can go about disproving these scurrilous accusations."

Vulture.com previously reported three more women came forward last week with new allegations.

Tyrone A. Blackburn, the attorney representing the women, said a victim who was 20 at the time alleged the couple "pulled out a pill and forced her to swallow it." Another woman claimed the couple trafficked her across three states.

Their stories resemble similar accusations by other women who claim they were drugged and sexually assaulted by the couple and their friends.

Blackburn sent letters to prosecutors in Georgia and California requesting a criminal investigation. So far, no charges have been filed.

Handout/DNCC via Getty Images

Michelle Obama told London schoolgirls they should view the coronavirus as a "great blessing" and an opportunity for growth.

Mrs. Obama spoke on Wednesday to schoolgirls at Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (EGA) School in London.

Obama said the girls should view the lockdowns and restrictions as a "great blessing". She said the Covid is an opportunity to learn how to navigate through life and "things that you're not necessarily prepared for."

"I would view this as a great blessing to all of you, right. Because right now you're learning how to get through something hard and uncomfortable and unpredictable," she said.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Mrs. Obama gave a similar speech to her daughters, Malia and Sasha.

"And as I've told my girls, that's what life is. No matter how high you get, or how smart you are, or how successful, life will throw you things that you're not necessarily prepared for. And if you know how to get yourself through it, you will succeed."

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The former first lady's remarks caused an uproar on social media.

But Jo Dibb, executive headteacher at EGA, told The Times newspaper that she thought Mrs. Obama's advice was "great".

Dibb said viewing the coronavirus as something that will help us in the future is a "really positive way of looking at things."

"If we just spend our time just blaming everything and making excuses and thinking, 'Well, I don't have to do well at school because there's a pandemic', then we've lost anyway, so I think that's such great advice," she said.