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Rapper Kevin Gates is apparently butt over about my post dated Oct. 25, titled "Rapper Kevin Gates touts semen retention men should focus on pleasing women."

When celebrities don't like a post I've written, they resort to using deceptive tactics to get my blog taken down -- such as filing fake copyright infringement notices.

On Tuesday, a London-based company, the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI), emailed a copyright infringement accusing your auntie of illegally posting Gates' "sound recordings" on my blog.

The email referenced the above titled post -- which does not contain any links to sound recordings.

The company also emailed this notice to my host, hoping they would snatch my blog down under threat of a lawsuit.

IFPI is waiting for my response to the copyright notice, so here is my response: Keep waiting.

I'm not taking the post down because I am not illegally infringing on his copyright.

Why would I post Kevin Gates' garbage music on my blog?

Like I said, this is the tactic that C- and D-list celebrities use when they don't like something I've written.

If I had a different host, my blog would probably be deleted and you would all be left wondering what happened.

Read the fake "copyright infringement" notice below.
 

Dear Sir/Madam,

I am contacting you on behalf of the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry ("IFPI") and the record companies it represents. The IFPI is a trade association that represents around 1,300 major and independent record companies in the US and internationally who create, manufacture and distribute sound recordings (the "IFPI Represented Companies").

The information set forth in this notice is accurate and, under penalty of perjury, we submit that we are authorised [sic] to act on behalf of the IFPI Represented Companies in matters involving the infringement of exclusive rights that the IFPI Represented Companies hold in their sound recordings, including enforcing their copyrights and other legal rights on the Internet.

We have learned that your service is making available, distributing and/or referring/linking users to infringing copies of the sound recordings listed below, the copyrights in which are exclusively owned or controlled by one or more IFPI Represented Companies.

We have included in the table below the URL for the locations where we have identified instances of making available, distributing and/or referring/linking users to the IFPI Represented Companies' Sound Recordings on your service.

We have a good faith belief that the above-described activity is not authorised [sic] by the copyright owner, its agent, or the law.

We are asking for your immediate assistance in stopping this unauthorised [sic] activity. We require you to take action to immediately cease making available, distributing and/or referring/linking users to infringing copies of the IFPI Represented Companies’ Sound Recordings on your service. That action should include, where applicable:

• Deleting all copies from your service’s servers; and

• Deleting and/or disabling all URLs;

The action required should be taken not only in relation to the URLs/locations indicated in the notice, but in relation to all instances of making available, distributing and/or referring/linking users to infringing copies of the IFPI Represented Companies’ Sound Recordings on your service.

Further, we ask you to take reasonable steps to prevent further instances of making available, distributing and/or referring/linking users to infringing copies of the IFPI Represented Companies’ Sound Recordings on your service.

Our top priority is to prevent the continued availability of the IFPI Represented Companies’ content on the internet. Unauthorised [sic] copies of sound recordings that are freely available, especially pre-release recordings, cause substantial damage to the IFPI Represented Companies every hour and day

they remain available. In sending this notice we are providing you with specific knowledge of the unauthorised [sic] activity detailed above and are seeking to ensure that infringing content is removed from the internet as quickly as possible through your cooperation. However, please note that we do not admit that we or the IFPI Represented Companies are responsible for detecting infringing material and notifying you of it.

Our use of a notice in this form, as required by you, is meant to facilitate your removal of the infringing material listed above and we neither admit nor accept that you are a 'service provider' for the purposes of the United States’ Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), or any similar legislation in another jurisdiction, or that it is necessary to serve, or that you are entitled to be served, with such a notice. IFPI itself and on behalf of the IFPI Represented Companies expressly reserves all rights in this regard.

In addition, this notice does not constitute a waiver of any right to recover damages incurred by virtue of any unauthorised [sic] activities described in this notice, and such rights as well as claims for other relief under the laws of the United States or any applicable legislation in any other jurisdiction, are hereby expressly reserved.

You may contact me at IFPI Secretariat, 7 Air Street, London W1B 5AD, United Kingdom or email Notices@ifpi.org, to discuss this notice.

We await your response.

Yours faithfully,

Melissa Morgia

Director of Content Protection & Enforcement

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Instagram

Popular Youtuber and Instagram influencer Omi in a Hellcat faces 514 years in prison after prosecutors indicted him and two associates in a scheme to sell copyrighted cable network programs to thousands of subscribers on his online firestick service.

Prosecutors say Omi, 36, and his two associates, Jesse Gonzales, 42, of Pico Rivera, Calif., and Michael Barone, 36, of Richmond Hill, N.Y., must forfeit nearly $35 million in assets, including over 50 luxury cars and motorcycles, as well as dozens of homes and businesses in Philadelphia.

Omi's companies operated under different names, including Gears TV, Reboot, Reloaded and Gears.

Thousands of users paid a monthly fee to access premium cable TV and sports content through firesticks.

His illegal enterprise earned him over $30 million between March 2016 and November 2019 when his homes were raided by the feds, VladTV reports.

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YouTube

The Philadelphia native, real name Bill Omar Carrasquillo, is charged with conspiracy, violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, reproduction of a protected work, access device fraud, making false statements to a bank, income tax evasion and money laundering.

Federal agents seized nearly all of Omi's assets in a raid in 2019. Feds also froze his girlfriend's bank accounts.

Still, he continued to taunt the feds on his YouTube channel and in interviews with other influencers.

Omi's lawyer, Donte Mills, stated his client is being falsely accused, and that his enterprise was legit.

"Mr. Carrasquillo tapped into a brand-new, unregulated industry and was very successful. Most people are called pioneers when they do that; Omar is called a criminal. The government assumes my client was not smart enough to do this legally because of his background. He is and we will prove that."

 

 

Tom Curtis/WireImage

Musician Eddy Grant is suing President Donald Trump for using his 1982 hit song "Electric Avenue" during a campaign video clip.

The video features an animated train with Trump's campaign logo speeding through a town while Biden follows along in a railroad handcar.

Grant's song plays throughout the duration of the video, which ends with letters spelling out "Biden Train" falling off the screen.

"Electric Avenue" plays in the video clip, which Trump tweeted last month. The video clip garnered 13 million views through Tuesday afternoon.

The campaign removed the video, but the 72-year-old Guyanese-British singer-songwriter filed a lawsuit Tuesday, citing Trump for "continued to willfully and wrongfully infringing Plaintiffs' copyrights."

Grant's lawyer noted "substantial damage and irreparable harm has occurred and will continue to occur to my client and his reputation as an artist not affiliated in any way with your campaign."

The Trump campaign has received warnings and legal action after multiple demands to stop using copyrighted music by other musicians in his campaign rallies.
 

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Remember the young lady who was canceled by social media for claiming she only dates billionaires and CEOs?

B. Simone, star of Wild 'N Out on MTV and VH1, was dragged on social media just last week for claiming she only dates men with enough cash to provide her with the lifestyle she deserves.

"You're not going to understand my lifestyle. You're not going to understand why I have to be up at 3 a.m," Simone told Nick Cannon.

The 30-year-old entrepreneur, who earned her first million selling makeup, is suing bloggers who claim she stole the content for her book titled Baby Girl Manifest the Life You Want.

Rapper Meek Mill rushed to her defense after several bloggers accused her of stealing their content.

The book has since been removed from B. Simone's website.
 

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FayesVision/WENN.com, WENN/Avalon

Cece Peniston is the 3rd songwriter to accuse pop star Lizzo of plagiarizing their work. Earlier this week, songwriting team Justin and Jeremiah Raisen accused the "Truth Hurts" singer of stealing the line "I just took a DNA test and found out I'm 100% that bitch".

But they later confessed they stole the lyric from Black British rapper, Mina Lioness, for a song called "Healthy".

Judy Eddy/WENN.com

Then '90s house music star CeCe Peniston (pictured) accused the morbidly obese singer of stealing her "YaYa EE" ad-lib for "Juice" from her dance track "Finally" without permission.

"For everybody who thought I was exaggerating on my claims of #copyrightinfringement please go check out the article I'm the the #3rd person who has said something," Peniston wrote on Instagram.com on Thursday.

John Lamparski/Getty Images

"... just for the record and so you understand ... anytime anybody uses a song over 7 seconds thats using a "portion" of their copyright, Lizzo not only takes over that, she’s used several times adding up to about 40 seconds, its my lyric it's written down as well , it's the signature to the opening in my song #finally and all commercials are using it from the "Adlib" section because they know it's catchy sooo #notjustanadlib it's a check !!!! @umpg @atlanticrecords".

So far, no copyright lawsuits have been filed.
 

View this post on Instagram

For everybody who thought I was exaggerating on my claims of #copyrightinfringement please go check out the article I’m the the #3rd person who has said something @lizzobeeating #cecepeniston #lizzo #music #yaayumsong #finally #mysong just for the record and so you understand ... anytime anybody uses a song over 7 seconds thats using a “portion” of their copyright , Lizzo not only takes over that , she’s used several times adding up to about 40 seconds , its my lyric it’s written down as well , it’s the signature to the opening in my song #finally and all commercials are using it from the “Adlib “ section because they know it’s catchy sooo “#notjustanadlib it’s a check !!!! @umpg @atlanticrecords

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