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Reggaeton star Karol G did her best Beyoncé imitation when she tumbled down a flight of steps onstage during a show in Miami on Friday night.

It's no coincidence that Karol is sometimes referred to as the "The Beyoncé of Reggaeton."

The 30-year-old Medellin, Colombia singer is recovering after taking a nasty spill down the steps while performing "Ahora Me Llama" ("Now He Calls Me") at the FTX Arena in Miami.

A dancer rushed over to help her up. But, like Beyonce, Karol twirled her weave and continued the show.

Later, she broke down in tears while telling the crowd in Spanish: "All my nails broke, I think my knee broke. Everything hurts."

Karol was proud that she sold out the FTX arena for the first time ever.

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You may not have heard of her, but Karol G has billions more views on YouTube than Beyoncé and Rihanna combined. She signed her first record deal after competing in the reality show "El Factor Xs."

Who can forget that video of Beyoncé taking a nasty spill onstage -- and nearly breaking the Internet back in the day.

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This GIF is still in heavy rotation online, although Bey's team managed to scrub the video from the Internet.

In 2017, Karol G collaborated with Puerto Rican rapper Bad Bunny on the hit song "Ahora Me Llama." She won a Latin Grammy for Best New Artist in 2018. And in 2019, her song "Tusa" featuring Nicki Minaj went platinum.

Her "Tusa" music video racked up over 1.2 billion views on YouTube.
 

 

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Latin Grammys bosses defended this year's Latin Grammy nominations following social media attacks from urban acts who were shut out of the major categories.

Daddy Yankee (pictured above) and J Balvin led the backlash following the announcement of the nominations on Tuesday, Sept. 24. Critics claimed the Latin Recording Academy voters favored Latin artists for the top prizes, while ignoring urban artists.

These artists weren't included in the Record of the Year, Song of the Year, or Album of the Year categories - despite the fact they dominated streaming services over the last year.

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Balvin (pictured) wrote, in Spanish, "Without reggaeton, there are no Latin Grammys."

While Daddy Yankee added:

"Despite being nominated, I don't agree with the way they treated the genre and a lot of my colleagues. Remember one very important thing: Their platform was not the one that created this movement. This goes beyond a prize. This is culture, credibility, relevance, and RESPECT."

Latin Recording Academy bosses released a statement on Wednesday, denying the allegations:

"We respect and admire all the genres that compose the world of Latin music. In 2004, The Latin Recording Academy led the charge for recognizing reggaeton (urban) in several categories, adapting to the evolution of music. The Latin Recording Academy has followed a strict voting process for the past 20 years. The members, through their votes, select what they believe merits a nomination.

"The Academy has never influenced their decisions, have always honored, and respected their elections, even if there are people who do not agree with the results. Nevertheless, we hear the frustration and discontent. We invite the leaders of the urban community to get involved with the Academy, to get involved with the process, and to get involved with discussions that improve the Academy. At its core, The Latin Recording Academy belongs to its members, from all genres, and our doors are always open. Together we can all make it work. Let’s do it!"

The Latin Grammys will take place in November.