Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Sha'Carri Richardson, who qualified for a spot on the U.S. Olympic Track & Field team, revealed her mother died last week.

The 21-year-old Dallas native revealed her personal loss after winning the women's 100-meter dash at the Olympic trials in Eugene, Oregon over the weekend.

She ran a blistering 10.86 seconds, just missing Florence Joyner's world record by 0.24 seconds.

Patrick Smith/Getty Images

After her qualifying run, Richardson went to the stands to embrace her grandmother.

She told ESPN, "My family has kept me grounded. This year has been crazy for me. Going from just last week, losing my biological mother, and I'm still here."

The LSU track & field standout said her personal loss motivates her to strive for Olympic greatness.

MICHAL CIZEK/AFP via Getty Images

"I'm still here. Last week, finding out my biological mother passed away and still choosing to pursue my dreams, still coming out here, still here to make the family that I do still have on this earth proud. And the fact [is] nobody knows what I go through. Everybody has struggles and I understand that, but y'all see me on this track and y'all see the poker face I put on, but nobody but them and my coach know what I go through on a day-to-day basis.

"I'm highly grateful for them. Without them, there would be no me. Without my grandmother, there would be no Sha'Carri Richardson. My family is my everything, my everything until the day I'm done."

OLI SCARFF/AFP via Getty Images

Richardson won a gold medal at the junior Olympics in 2016.

The last American woman to win a gold Olympic medal in the 100 yard dash was Gail Devers in 1996.

Richardson has a chance to top both Devers and Joyner at the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympic Games next month. The 2020 Tokyo Olympics was delayed a year due to the pandemic.
 

Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images

Retired boxing champ Floyd Mayweather returned to the ring on Sunday night, June 6, for an exhibition fight with YouTuber Logan Paul.

The two pugilists went toe-to-toe for eight rounds without a knockout at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami, Florida, and Floyd confessed that Logan surprised him with his skills.

"I was surprised by him tonight. He's a great young fighter - strong and tough. He's better than I thought he was."

However, fans who paid $50 to watch the bout were not impressed with either fighter. Many fans demanded their money back after it appeared that Floyd held Logan up to prevent him from slumping to the canvas in the sixth round.

Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images

They hollered that the fight was fixed - and that the 44-year-old champ deliberately went easy on Logan to avoid knocking him out.

Prior to the Logan boxing match, Floyd expressed concern that fans would demand their money back if the Logan fight ended with an early knockout.

He had good reason to be worried.

The undefeated champion boxer retired as a professional fighter in 2017 with a pristine 50-0 record. But he grew bored with retired life, so he agreed to participate in exhibition fights if the money was right.

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

On New Year's Ever 2018, he fought 20-year-old Japanese kick boxer Tenshin Nasukawa in Tokyo. The three-round exhibition ended with three first-round knockouts.

Tenshin was seen crying on camera -- and boxing fans howled over what they believed was a rigged fight.

Floyd is now considering another easy exhibition fight -- maybe against Paul's brother, Jake Paul, who loudly challenged the fighter to a match earlier this year.

Watch highlights from the fight below.
 

Bettmann/Getty Images

Atlanta Braves legend Hank Aaron passed away early Friday, Jan. 22. He was 86. The family did not reveal a cause of death.

Born Henry Louis Aaron in Mobile, Alabama, the 25-time All-Star was best known for breaking Babe Ruth's all-time home run record with his 715th home run.

The scene of Aaron being mobbed by fans as he rounded the bases remains an iconic moments in Major League Baseball history.

The original fence and wall where Aaron's 715th home run landed still stands in the same spot in the parking lot of Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia.

Aaron ended his remarkable career with 755 career home runs. His record was surpassed by San Francisco Giants legend Barry Bonds, who was suspected of using performance-enhancing drugs.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Aaron, pictured with his wife Billye in 2019, still holds several MLB offensive records. The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on its "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list.

After retiring from baseball, he served as the senior vice president of the Atlanta Braves.

In 1982, he was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Aaron is survived by his wife Billye Suber Williams and six children.
 

Photo may have been deleted

EURweb.com

A Pee Wee league coach who punched a 9-year-old boy during a youth championship game has been banned for life from coaching in the league. Cell phone video shows the coach punch the boy like a man, knocking the child down twice.

When the little boy began to cry, the coach kicked him off the field and called another player off the bench to replace him.

Equally as bad are the grown Black men standing around watching the abuse and doing nothing to stop it.

The incident occurred during the American Youth Football Championships in Kissimmee, Florida, according to EURweb.com. The unnamed coach apologized for his behavior.

A loyal reader writes:

Sandra,

Have you seen the video of the little league coach, violently assaulting one of the boys he coaches? I would be UNDERNEATH the jail.

It reminds of something that happened years ago when I lived in Columbus, Georgia. Both my friend and I were single mothers and our sons played on a little league football team. Something very similar to this happened to her son. She did nothing, even participated in calling her own son "a p-ssy a-girl" for crying AFTER the coach slapped him around for fumbling the ball. Her son was 7 at the time. The coach was in such a rage he cursed me out for telling him that was foul for how he ABUSED her son. He was later arrested and found guilty of causing bodily injury to a child, she was charged with something too, I don't recall what it was. Our sons are all around 23-26 years old now. My sons are both in the military and doing very well. The son that she didn't defend that day on the field, is a known woman beater, and is in and out of jail, her eldest son, has very little to do with her.
While I know this is WAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY to the left of this story, we as mothers, (if we're single mothers) have a greater responsibility of protecting our sons from abusive men (coaches and the like) and not allowing toxic masculinity to be disguised as "manning up" our sons.

Bettmann via Getty Images

American football legend Gale Sayers has died of natural causes. He was 77.

The Chicago Bears star and Hall of Fame running back was nicknamed "Kansas Comet" for his electrifying speed. Sayers played his entire NFL career - 6 years - with the Bears.

Sayers set an NFL record in his first season as a professional by scoring 22 touchdowns, including six in a single game.

In 1967, Sayers and Bears teammate Brian Piccolo became the first interracial roommates in the NFL. Piccolo was later diagnosed with metastatic cancer and he passed away in 1970.

Sayers' and Piccolo's enduring friendship was documented in a made-for-TV movie, Brian's Song, with Sayers portrayed by Billy Dee Williams in the 1971 original and by Mekhi Phifer in the 2001 remake.

Tiffany Rose/WireImage

In March 2017, Sayers' second wife, Ardythe Bullard, announced he had been diagnosed with dementia four years prior. She stated that a Mayo Clinic doctor confirmed his dementia was likely caused by physical contact during his brief football career.

"It wasn't so much getting hit in the head," she said. "It's just the shaking of the brain when they took him down with the force they play the game in."

Hall of Fame President & CEO David Baker said in a statement, "All those who love the game of football mourn the loss of one of the greatest to ever play this Game with the passing of Chicago Bears legend Gale Sayers. He was the very essence of a team player - quiet, unassuming and always ready to compliment a teammate for a key block. Gale was an extraordinary man who overcame a great deal of adversity during his NFL career and life."

Photo by Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

ESPN's sports reporter Doris Burke has tested positive for the coronavirus that causes Covid-19.

Burke, 54, covers many of ESPN's live basketball broadcasts including the NBA and WNBA playoffs. She has been with the network since 1991.

While chatting on Adrian Wojnarowski's podcast, Burke revealed she was tested because she has struggled with health problems recently.

Burke warned people to take the virus seriously and to comply with social distancing recommendations.

Burke is the highest profile NBA sports personality to be diagnosed with the disease. She joins 2 unidentified Laker players, as well as Brooklyn Nets star Kevin Durant, Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert of the Utah Jazz, Detroit Pistons forward Christian Wood, Boston Celtics guard Marcus Smart, and 3 unidentified Nets players.

The NBA canceled its season after Gobert, 27, was the first player to test positive. All of the players have since recovered from the virus.

Covid-19 causes no symptoms or mild flu-like symptoms in healthy adults who don't smoke.