Jasmin Merdan / Moment

USA Today deleted tweets following public backlash to its article attempting to normalize abnormal adult attraction to children.

The article, titled "What the public keeps getting wrong about pedophilia," was quickly moved behind a paywall.

The writer quoted researchers who claimed there's a difference between pedophiles who harm children and people who only think about it.

The writer claimed scientific studies found "pedophilia is determined in the womb, though environmental factors may influence whether someone acts on an urge to abuse."

"Not all people who sexually abuse children are pedophiles. Some pedophiles never abuse children, experts say, and some people who sexually abuse children do not sexually prefer them, but use them as a surrogate for an adult partner. They may be disinhibited and anti-social, with impulse control problems."

NurPhoto via Getty Images

"The evidence suggests it is inborn. It's neurological," said James Cantor, a clinical psychologist and sex researcher. "Pedophilia is the attraction to children, regardless of whether the (person) ever ... harms."

Cantor said there's no treatment for pedophilia, but pedophiles can be taught self-control and strategies to compensate, which he said is more likely if they're under the care of a professional.

"There are the people who are sexually attracted to children ... (and then) there are some people who molest kids who are not pedophiles," said Anna Salter, a psychologist, author, and internationally recognized expert. "They molest kids because of anger. They molest kids because they're scared of adult women. They molest kids to get revenge, but they don't actually have an age preference for prepubescent children."

After deleting the tweets, USA Today explained:

"A previous thread did not include all information and the story it was written about is behind a paywall. We made the decision to delete the thread."

Photo may have been deleted

FBI, AP

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has demanded the IP addresses of everyone who read a USA Today article about two agents killed during a Florida child porn raid.

The FBI issued a subpoena to the news outlet demanding the IPs and phone numbers of everyone who clicked on the story between 8:03 p.m. and 8:38 p.m. on Feb. 2, 2021.

Photo may have been deleted

USA Today

The article was published that same day on the USA Today website at 9:30 a.m.

The newspaper's publisher has refused to hand over the information, citing a violation of the First Amendment.

On Feb. 2, agents Daniel Alfin and Laura Schwartzenberger were gunned down and three others were wounded while serving a warrant on 55-year-old David Huber.

The suspect started shooting as the agents approached his apartment in Fort Lauderdale shortly after 6 a,m.

Huber took his own life after opening fire on the agents.

USA Today, owned by Gannett corporation, was among the many newspapers covering the story that morning. It isn't clear if the FBI is demanding the IP addresses and phone numbers from other media outlets that covered the story.

According to DailyMail.com, the subpoena doesn't specify why the FBI wants the information.

A missing child case in Houston has been solved by Texas authorities. The infant who vanished 8 years ago will be reunited with his mother after police arrested the child's former babysitter for kidnapping him.

Krystle Rochelle Tanner, 26, is being held without bond in a San Augustine jail. The now 8-year-old boy will be reunited with his mother, Auboni Champion-Morin, who hasn't seen her son since he was 8-months-old.

"I want to hold him in my arms and let him know who I am," said Champion-Morin, who lives in Houston. "I hope he can feel the same thing I feel for him." But before the reunion happens, Champion-Morin will have to undergo a DNA test to prove the boy is her son, even though authorities know it's him.

Police were led to Tanner last Summer after child welfare investigators in San Augustine County received a complaint that a mother was neglecting her two children. But when officials followed up on the complaint, they couldn't locate the older boy.

Tanner initially told police she was keeping the boy for a woman she had met in a park, but she didn't know where he was. Sheriff's deputies had no records for the boy and little information to work with, according to USA Today.

The sheriff's were unaware of the missing baby case in Houston. That's because police closed the missing child case in 2006 after they were unable to locate Tanner or the baby, and the case went cold.

Chief Deputy Gary Cunningham of the San Augustine Sheriff's Department (pictured above) said the case was closed in 2006, after relatives of Tanner told them she vanished with the boy in 2004 and they had not heard from her.

Read more »