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Millions of Americans face eviction when the federally mandated moratorium on evictions expires in March. Former Vogue magazine editor-at-large Andre Leon Talley says he is among them.

Talley, 72, says he's being evicted from his colonial New York mansion in a messy rent battle with former Manolo Blahnik CEO, George Malkemus, who Talley owes $500k in back rent.

Talley claims Malkemus originally bought the home for him for just over $1 million in 2004 -- and that he is the rightful owner.

He now claims that Malkemus wants to evict him from the 11-room mansion in White Plains, NY, so he can sell it at a profit.
 

Talley said there is no lease agreement on the home and that he made "episodic payments" over time based on his income.

He said he had a "gentlemen's agreement" to transfer the title of the home to him after he paid back the purchase price.

In court documents obtained by the NY Post, Talley claims Malkemus and his life partner Anthony Yurgaitis agreed that Talley would exclusively own, occupy and care for the home. "It was agreed and always understood that Talley would, over time, 'pay off' the balance of the purchase price paid by the defendants at which point title would then formally be transferred to Talley," his court documents say.

He now claims that Malkemus and Yurgaitis are pressuring him to move out so they can sell it for their own profit.

"The timing and amount of these episodic payments were based on Talley's cash flow... Talley never made these payments to the Defendants on a monthly basis, and was not asked to."

In their eviction papers, Malkemus and Yurgaitis allege the former Vogue editor owes them $515,872 in back rent.

But Talley says he paid $1,075,588 by January 2020, and that he made the $120,000 down payment when the house was originally purchased. He also says he invested more than $200,000 for home improvements over the years.

In his lawsuit, Talley is demanding that he be allowed to stay in the property and that the title be transferred in his name.

An attorney for Malkemus and Yurgaitis said he is preparing a counterclaim. "Malkemus and Yurgaitis are the record owners of the house and want to sell it," the attorney said.

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Talley was appointed creative director of Vogue by Anna Wintour back in 1983. In his memoir, he said his once close relationship with the Vogue editor-in-chief was over.

He officially retired from editing in 2014.

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André Leon Talley praised Vogue magazine's controversial cover featuring Senator Kamala Harris'.

The Afro-Indian vice president-elect is pictured smiling apprehensively with her hands clasped in front of her on the February 2021 issue. Instead of the glam look, she is clad in casual work clothes and black Converse Chuck Taylor All Star sneakers.

The controversial "working girl" cover sparked fury on social media, with many saying the cover was "disrespectful" and even racist.

But Talley, a former editor-at-large for American Vogue, supported his former boss, Anna Wintour, in a lengthy Instagram post on Tuesday.

"It's GREAT. JUST GREAT. GREAT," he wrote, after Wintour responded to the backlash in a statement on Tuesday. Talley said the cover will inspire young women around the world to wear work clothes rather than expensive designer clothing.

"Her work uniform with her ubiquitous Converse sneakers is aspirational. I predict its [sic] going to set a trend for all young women all over the world, [who] are going to dress like Kamala Harris," he wrote.

Talley, 71, defended 26-year-old aspiring photographer Tyler Mitchell -- the first Black photographer to shoot a cover for American Vogue in the magazine's history.

Talley said Mitchell's layman photography "comes from a universe that is new. He is not aligned with the titans of @vogue photographers before him... His work must be seen through the prism of 2021."

Harris' frantic staffers contacted Vogue editors on Monday after the cover leaked over the weekend. They demanded to know why Vogue chose a "test photo" for its print edition rather than the agreed upon photo of Harris wearing a powder blue pantsuit. The latter photo was chosen for the online digital edition instead.

There were calls for Wintour to step down, but Talley said she isn't going anywhere.

"All I can say is Anna Wintour is not abdicating. And I wish I was there, at Vogue, to celebrate w/the team," he wrote.
 

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Vogue

Kamala Harris' team is furious over her photo on the cover of American Vogue. Harris' camp is outraged that the first Afro-Indian female vice president-elect looks like a candidate about to hit the campaign trail.

This weekend, Vogue unveiled two covers for its February 2021 issue. One cover, featuring Harris in work clothes and black Converse sneakers, was supposed to be on the digital online issue.

According to the Associated Press (AP), Harris' team was under the impression that the photo of Harris wearing a powder blue blazer would make the print edition cover.

Harris' staffers frantically reached out to Vogue editors to complain about the cover switch that they did not agree upon.

According to the AP, "the shot of the country's soon-to-be No. 2 leader isn't what both sides had agreed upon."

"Harris' team was unaware that the cover photo had been switched until images leaked late Saturday, according to a person involved in the negotiations over how Harris would be featured on the cover. Harris' office declined comment and the person spoke Sunday on condition of anonymity."

The cover photo was shot by Tyler Mitchell, a Black photographer who shot Beyonce's cover for the September 2018 Vogue issue.

In unrelated news, House Democrats have the necessary votes to impeach President Donald Trump for a second time.

The Washington Post reports that House Democrats formerly introduce articles of impeachment against Trump on Monday, Jan. 11, for "inciting an insurrectionist mob" to storm the Capitol.

"We actually have the votes. There's no doubt about that," Rep. David Cicilline (D-Rhode Island) told The Post.

The text of the article included a quote uttered by Trump at his rally moments before the riots in Washington, DC on January 6: "If you don't fight like hell you're not going to have a country anymore."

5 people died in the ensuing melee, including an Air Force veteran who was shot by a DC cop, and three people who died from natural causes (obesity, high blood pressure).

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Getty Images, Instagram

Harry Styles responded to a comment Candace Owens made about his effeminate attire on the cover of Vogue magazine.

Harry, an ex member of the boy band One Direction, became the first male to appear solo on the cover of Vogue. He marked the occasion by wearing a frock on the cover.

Last month, Candace retweeted a Vogue post with the comment:

"There is no society that can survive without strong men. The East knows this. In the west, the steady feminization of our men at the same time that Marxism is being taught to our children is not a coincidence. It is an outright attack. Bring back manly men."

The bisexual singer threw some subtle shade at the pro-Trump conservative activist on Instagram.

"Bring back manly men," he captioned a picture of himself wearing a powder blue suit and ruffled shirt while eating a banana -- which some IG followers say is meant as a phallic symbol.

Styles also addressed Owens' comments in an interview with Variety, saying:

"To not wear [something] because it's females' clothing, you shut out a whole world of great clothes. And I think what's exciting about right now is you can wear what you like. It doesn't have to be X or Y. Those lines are becoming more and more blurred."

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Olivia Wilde slammed conservative activist Candace Owens after she criticized British pop singer Harry Styles for wearing dresses during a recent magazine photo shoot.

Harry, an ex member of the boy band One Direction, became the first male to appear solo on the cover of Vogue. He marked the occasion by blurring gender norms in a photo shoot that featured him wearing dresses.

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Vogue magazine

On Sunday, Candace retweeted a Vogue post with the comment:

"There is no society that can survive without strong men. The East knows this. In the west, the steady feminization of our men at the same time that Marxism is being taught to our children is not a coincidence. It is an outright attack. Bring back manly men."

Director and actress Wilde, who is friends with Harry and cast him in her new movie Don't Worry Darling, reacted angrily to the conservative commentator's post, tweeting, "You're Pathetic."

Candace later clarified her "manly men" comment in a follow-up tweet.

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In his Vogue interview Harry explained he shops for women's clothing to challenge gender norms in society.

"I'll go in shops sometimes, and I just find myself looking at the women's clothes thinking they're amazing.

"It's like anything - anytime you're putting barriers up in your own life, you're just limiting yourself."

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Former Vogue staffers are still angry over a writer's treatment of this old photo of Kendall Jenner showing off a gold tooth at a London Fashion Week party hosted by Burberry in February 2017.

Vogue magazine's editor-in-chief Anna Wintour apologized after former Vogue staffers complained about racism and discrimination.

In a recent NY Times article, former staffers, who are Black, complained that Wintour didn't "keep pace with the public's changing issues with racism" and cultural misappropriation.

They point to the image of Kendall Jenner wearing a gold tooth -- a dental accessory that is commonly associated with Black people.

BACKGRID

A Vogue contributor wrote in an article at the time: "The flashing teeth felt like a playful wink to the city's free-spirited aesthetic - or perhaps a proverbial kiss to her rumored boyfriend A$AP Rocky."

Black staff members complained about the article. One Black staffer contacted magazine executives saying "the story insensitively endorsed an instance of cultural appropriation."

Newspress / BACKGRID

According to the Times, one former employee contacted Wintour by email to explain why some Black staffers were offended by the story: "If Kendall wants to do something stupid, fine, but our writers (especially white ones) don't need to [weigh] in and glorify it or ascribe reasons to it that read culturally insensitive."

But Wintour was not receptive of their complaints. After several email exchanges, she wrote, "Well I honestly don't think that's a big deal."

Condé Nast, which owns Vogue, said in a statement: "The coverage itself is not cultural appropriation."

The implication is that Kendall herself misappropriated Black culture by wearing the gold tooth.

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Lizzo has come out against commercializing the body positive movement, which seeks to decrease the stigma surrounding obesity.

The "Juice" singer, who is morbidly obese, is a huge advocate for self-love and body positivity. But in a recent chat with Vogue magazine she admitted she believes the movement calling for the acceptance of all bodies has been partially misappropriated.

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"It's commercialized," she said. "Now, you look at the hashtag 'body positive,' and you see smaller-framed girls, curvier girls. Lotta white girls. And I feel no ways about that, because inclusivity is what my message is always about.

She continued: "I'm glad that this conversation is being included in the mainstream narrative. What I don't like is how the people that this term was created for are not benefiting from it."

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The "Good As Hell" rapper said the body positive movement excludes morbidly obese women like herself who don't fit the mainstream standard. Lizzo says obesity is beautiful and she is proof of that.

"Girls with back fat, girls with bellies that hang, girls with thighs that aren't separated, that overlap. Girls with stretch marks. You know, girls who are in the 18-plus club..."

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Lizzo went on to state she wants to "normalize" her morbid obesity "and not just be like, 'Ooh, look at this cool movement. Being fat is body positive.' No, being fat is normal.

"I think now, I owe it to the people who started this to not just stop here. We have to make people uncomfortable again, so that we can continue to change. Change is always uncomfortable, right?"

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Steven Klein for British Vogue

Robyn Rihanna Fenty says she is open to raising children as a single mother after multiple failed relationships with emotionally unavailable men.

The 32-year-old Bajan, who is fast approaching the high-risk age for pregnant women, graces the cover of British Vogue magazine.

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Steven Klein for British Vogue

Rihanna posed for a high-fashion photo shoot by well-known fashion photographer Steven Klein.

She revealed to British Vogue that she is aware of her emotional flaws that led her to have failed relationships with men and at least one woman.

She said that, despite her history of failed relationships, she still wants to raise "three or four children" alone if she has to.

"Would I do it on my own? Hell yeah!" she told the magazine. She said she wants to have children within the next 10 years.

Rihanna dismissed the advice of childcare experts who say children are more well-rounded and mentally healthy if they grow up in a stable 2-parent household with a mother and father.

"I feel like society makes me want to feel like 'Oh you got it wrong...' They diminish you as a mother, [if] there's not a dad in your kids' lives," she said.

Rihanna suggested she wants to have children to give her the happiness she feels she can't get from men.

"The only thing that matters is happiness, that's the only healthy relationship between a parent and a child. That's the only thing that can raise a child truly, is love."

The pop singer split from Saudi billionaire Hassan Jameel in January after dating long distance for three years.

Her exes include troubled singer Chris Brown and bisexual rappers Drake and A$AP Rocky.

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Photo by Annie Leibovitz for Vogue

Cardi B and Offset turned to the church to help save their failing marriage after she caught him cheating on her.

The hip-hop power couple tied the knot in September, 2017. They welcomed their first child, daughter Kulture Kiari Cephus in July, 2018. But by December 2018, the "Bodak Yellow" rapper announced she and Offset had parted ways.

Cardi B and Offset, both 27, reconciled months later, thanks to priests who made house calls.

In a cover story interview for the January 2020 issue of U.S. Vogue magazine, Cardi confessed she tuned to priests to help restore her faith in men.

"Everybody on social media acts like relationships is perfect," she said in her familiar broken English. "Everybody has issues. I believe in forgiveness. I prayed on it. Me and my husband, we prayed on it. We had priests come to us. And we just came to an understanding like, bro, it's really us against the world," she said.

On the cover, Cardi cradles her 16-month-old daughter in her lap. She wears a red polka dot dress. Her legs spread open seductively. She wears her black, straight hair slicked back. Her and Kulture's baby hairs are laid to perfection.

Defending her decision to stand by her husband, Cardi added, "people were so mad at me; a lot of women felt disappointed in me."

She addressed her female fans who may find themselves in a similar situation.

"If you love somebody and you stop being with them, and you're depressed and social media is telling you not to talk to that person because he cheated, you're not really happy on the inside until you have the conversation."

Despite new rumors that Offset cheated on her again, she added: "He has my back for everything, I have his back for everything."

Vogue cover credits: Michael Kors Collection dress. Cartier earring and rings. Tiffany &Co. bracelet. Jimmy Choo shoes. Hair, Tokyo Stylez; makeup, Hannah Murray. Fashion Editor: Tonne Goodman. Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Vogue, January 2020

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@Klossfilms for British Vogue

American singer Lizzo graces the December 2019 cover of British Vogue magazine. But not all of her fans are excited for her first ever Vogue cover.

Lizzo was styled in a black Versace frock with a feather boa in B&W photographs shot by @Klossfilms. A cheap photo filter effect makes Lizzo appear 3 sizes smaller - which doesn't suit her fans who complained about the unnecessary filter effect.

One fan tweeted: "I love Lizzo so much and am so happy she's on the Vogue UK cover BUT why did they put that ugly filter on her portrait ???"

Another user tweeted: "This cheap glitch / acid blur effect is homophobic".

Lizzo told British Vogue that she felt worthless growing up because thick women like her weren't represented in fashion magazines.

"When you don't see yourself, you start to think something's wrong with you. Then you want to look like those things and when you realize it's a physical impossibility, you start to think, 'What the fuck is wrong with me?' I think that took a greater toll on me, psychologically, growing up than what anyone could have said to me."