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Maryland's top cop Marilyn Mosby was indicted for lying on mortgage loan applications for two vacation properties she purchased in Florida.

Mosby, a Democrat, was indicted by a federal grand jury on two counts of perjury and making false statements on mortgage loan applications, Yahoo News reported. The indictment was unsealed on Thursday.

The indictment alleges the mom-of-two lied about experiencing "adverse financial consequences" during the pandemic in 2020.

Federal prosecutors say her gross salary of nearly $250,000 increased by nearly $10,000 between 2019 and 2020.

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The indictment also alleges that Mosby lied on a COVID relief application. She claimed she lost income during the pandemic and received $36,000, which she used "toward a down payment for a vacation home in Kissimmee Florida" in September 2020.

The indictment accuses Mosby of lying on applications for mortgages of nearly $500,000 for the Kissimmee, Florida, home and a nearly $430,000 mortgage for a condominium in Long Boat Key, Florida.

Mosby faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison for each count of perjury and a maximum of 30 years for each count of making false mortgage applications.

Mosby, 41, gained notoriety in 2015 for prosecuting five Baltimore police officers who arrested 25-year-old Freddie Gray in 2015.

Gray was found unresponsive in the back of a paddy wagon. He was later pronounced dead at a local hospital.

The five officers were eventually acquitted of all charges.

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Christmas came early for a self-professed "Haitian entrepreneur" who fleeced the government's pandemic relief PPP program to enrich himself.

Prosecutors accused Valesky Barosy of fraudulently obtaining loans from the federal Payroll Protection Program to buy a Lamborghini, a Rolex watch, designer clothing, and other luxury items

Barosy, 27, flaunted his ill-gotten gains on his deleted Instagram page where he amassed over 10,000 followers.

In one photo, Barosy, of Ft. Lauderdale, posed outside a private jet. In another photo, he is seen exiting his white Lamborghini.

The Haitian-born businessman sought publicity as a self-made millionaire and immigrant success story.

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After arriving from Haiti a decade ago, Barosy worked his way up from an employee at Walmart to "regional Vice President" of his credit repair company that earned over $3.6 million in sales.

However, federal authorities say Barosy and his accomplices fraudulently applied for $4.2 million in PPP loans using false information.

In each loan application, Barosy allegedly submitted IRS tax returns that falsely inflated prior-year expenses, net profit, and payroll.

Barosy and his accomplices received approximately $2.1 million in PPP loans, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of Florida.

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Rolex

Federal agents raided Barosy's home and business and seized a Lamborghini Huracán, valued at over $150,000, Rolex and Hublot watches, and designer clothing from Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Chanel.

A federal grand jury indicted Barosy on charges of wire fraud, money laundering and aggravated identity theft.

Barosy is being held in a federal detention facility without bond. He faces up to 132 years in prison if convicted on all charges.

According to the federal government, over $1 billion in Covid relief funds have been stolen from the PPP program.

Florida is the nation's No. 1 fraud capital, with over $340 million in stolen funds going to that state alone.

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A former USC football player was arrested Monday and charged with defrauding California state's Covid-19 relief benefits.

Abdul-Malik MClain, a linebacker for Jackson State University, was charged with mail fraud and identity theft in a scheme to steal over $900,000 in COVID-related unemployment benefits.

McClain is accused of assisting a group of USC football players in filing fraudulent unemployment claims under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistant (PUA) program.

McClain is accused of helping the players fill out the application using information he knew to be false about their prior and future employment status.

California's Employment Development Department (EDD) authorized Bank of America to mail debit cards to McClain and other football players who then used the cards to withdraw cash at ATM machines.

The fraudulent applications sought more than $900,000 in unemployment benefits, but ultimately netted at least $227,736.

McClain allegedly sought and received a fee for his services from the players.

The crimes were committed from July 2020 to September 2020 while McClain was a student at USC.

McClain transferred to JSU in 2020 after his brother was suspended by USC for approaching students with a scheme to defraud EDD.

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Jason Lary, the Mayor of Stonecrest, Georgia, was arrested and arraigned on federal charges of wire fraud related to the theft of federal PPP relief funds.

Lania Boone, a bookkeeper hired by the city to disburse the funds, was also arraigned on federal charges of conspiring with Lary to steal PPP funds.

The funds were provided to the city of Stonecrest to address the city's economic needs amid the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020.

A total of $6 million was allocated to Stonecrest for face masks, Covid-19 education and testing, and rent relief.

The funds were distributed to churches, non-profit organizations and small businesses along with instructions to give contributions to entities Lary controlled.

For example, Lary presented a check for $150,000 to one church with instructions to give $50,000 to an entity called Real Estate Management Consultants, LLC (REMC).

Lary allegedly didn't tell the church that he controlled REMC.

Lary reportedly diverted funds to his own bank accounts to pay his taxes and to pay off the mortgage on his lakefront home.

"Lary allegedly abused the power and trust conferred on him as Mayor of Stonecrest to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars intended for COVID-19 relief," said Acting U.S. Attorney Kurt R. Erskine. "Instead of providing aid to Stonecrest's deserving citizens, Lary allegedly diverted funds for his own use, including to pay off his taxes and the mortgage on his lakefront home."

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18 former NBA players have been arrested and charged with defrauding the NBA's health and welfare benefit plan out of $4 million, federal prosecutors say.

Shannon Brown, pictured with ex-wife Monica Arnold in 2015, was indicted on October 7 by a federal grand jury in the Southern District of New York on charges of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and wire fraud.

Brown, 35, retired from the NBA in 2018 after 12 seasons. Monica, 40, divorced him a year later.

17 other former NBA players, including Sebastian Telfair, Glen "Big Baby" Davis and Darius Miles, were also charged with conspiracy to commit health care fraud and wire fraud.

Federal prosecutors say the retired NBA stars filed fraudulent insurance claims for reimbursement to the tune of $4 million. Of that amount, the players took in $2.5 million, according to prosecutors.

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Sebastian Telfair, 36, was seen departing the Federal Court in the Southern District of NY with an ankle monitor after being indicted by a federal grand jury on October 7 in New York City. He retired from the NBA in 2017 after playing 13 seasons.

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The other seventeen defendants were also equipped with ankle monitors.

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In this August 25, 2019 file photo, Glen "Big Baby" Davis, right, fights off defender Donte Greene during the BIG3 Playoffs in New Orleans, Louisiana. Davis retired from the NBA in 2019 after 12 seasons.

Davis, 35, was indicted by a federal grand jury in the Southern District of New York on charges of conspiracy to commit health care fraud and wire fraud.

On February 7, 2018, Davis was arrested and charged with drug possession and drug distribution after police found marijuana and a briefcase containing $92,000 in cash inside his hotel room in Aberdeen, Maryland.

The drug charges against Davis were later dropped in exchange for a plea deal.

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Popular Youtuber and Instagram influencer Omi in a Hellcat faces 514 years in prison after prosecutors indicted him and two associates in a scheme to sell copyrighted cable network programs to thousands of subscribers on his online firestick service.

Prosecutors say Omi, 36, and his two associates, Jesse Gonzales, 42, of Pico Rivera, Calif., and Michael Barone, 36, of Richmond Hill, N.Y., must forfeit nearly $35 million in assets, including over 50 luxury cars and motorcycles, as well as dozens of homes and businesses in Philadelphia.

Omi's companies operated under different names, including Gears TV, Reboot, Reloaded and Gears.

Thousands of users paid a monthly fee to access premium cable TV and sports content through firesticks.

His illegal enterprise earned him over $30 million between March 2016 and November 2019 when his homes were raided by the feds, VladTV reports.

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The Philadelphia native, real name Bill Omar Carrasquillo, is charged with conspiracy, violating the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, reproduction of a protected work, access device fraud, making false statements to a bank, income tax evasion and money laundering.

Federal agents seized nearly all of Omi's assets in a raid in 2019. Feds also froze his girlfriend's bank accounts.

Still, he continued to taunt the feds on his YouTube channel and in interviews with other influencers.

Omi's lawyer, Donte Mills, stated his client is being falsely accused, and that his enterprise was legit.

"Mr. Carrasquillo tapped into a brand-new, unregulated industry and was very successful. Most people are called pioneers when they do that; Omar is called a criminal. The government assumes my client was not smart enough to do this legally because of his background. He is and we will prove that."

 

 

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Former Love & Hip-Hop: Atlanta cast member Maurice "Mo" Fayne was sentenced to 17 years in prison for defrauding the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

According to TMZ, Fayne was sentenced Wednesday to 210 months in prison (17.5 years) after pleading guilty to 6 counts of bank and wire fraud.

Fayne agreed to a plea deal with prosecutors in exchange for dropping 14 other charges.

Federal prison time means Fayne will serve his full sentence.
 
READ ALSO: Mo Fayne Paid $5 Million to Casino to Cover Gambling Debts
 
After he's released from prison in 17 years, Fayne will serve 5 years of supervised release. He is also ordered to pay over $4.4 million in restitution.

Fayne was arrested on May 11, 2020 and charged with defrauding the federal Paycheck Protection Program for over $3 million.

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Fayne, who previously dated reality star Karlie Redd, reportedly applied for the funds for a trucking company that never turned a profit. He told the bank he needed the cash to pay 120 employees.

Prosecutors say Fayne spent over $2 million in coronavirus relief funds on jewelry, a Rolex wristwatch, cars, and child support payments.

Federal agents served a search warrant on Fayne's Dacula home where they recovered $80,000 in cash, including $9,400 that Fayne had in his pockets. Feds seized a 2019 Rolls Royce Wraith with the dealer tag still on it.

In addition to bank fraud, Fayne was charged with running a six-year Ponzi scheme and defrauding 20 investors to cover large gambling debts, prosecutors said.

"Fayne used the investors' money to pay his personal debts and expenses, and to fund an extravagant lifestyle for himself," prosecutors said in a statement.

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Ramon Abbas, an Instagram influencer from Nigeria, has pleaded guilty to defraud victims out of at least $24 million using email "phishing" scams.

Abbas, 37, was arrested in June in Dubai and extradited to Chicago to face money laundering and wire fraud charges.

Video shows a stunned Abbas in police custody inside his luxury 2-story Versace penthouse with its own pool and jacuzzi in Dubai. A childhood friend visiting him from Nigeria was briefly detained and released by special operations forces and Emerati police officers in June.

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Abbas now faces up to 20 years in prison in the US, after being extradited to Chicago then California last year.

Abbas and his crew hacked into computer systems after unsuspecting victims clicked on phishing links in emails. They then monitored the victims' emails looking for invoices or sales statements.

Abbas and his crew changed the banking info in the invoices, then siphoned the money into their own accounts. Victims included individuals and banks. The thieves stole $1 million meant for a children's hospital in Qatar.

Abbas cultivated an Internet persona that made him an Instagram star around the globe. He often wore expensive designer clothing, shoes and backpacks. His fleet of luxury automobiles worth $3 million were seized by police.

His lawyers told a judge that Abbas is the father of five children, including a child who lives with his mother in Virginia. But the judge ordered Abbas detained until his trial. Abbas was not allowed to stay with a girlfriend's uncle in Homewood, Illinois, because he was considered a flight risk.

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The federal prosecutor said Abbas "never visited" the girlfriend or their child in the United States and there is no evidence that he has ever even met this 'uncle.'

Abbas' lawyer said his client is a social media influencer who earned his millions legally by promoting high end luxury brands like Louis Vuitton, Gucci and Fendi on Instagram.
 


 

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A Washington D.C. pastor faces 20 years in prison for fraudulently obtaining $1.5 million from the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

Rudolph Brooks Jr. of Maryland deposited the funds into multiple bank accounts. The feds say he used part of the loan to purchase 39 vehicles including a 2018 Tesla Model 3.

The affidavit states warrants were issued to seize $2.2 million from Brooks' bank accounts.

Brooks, who is pastor at Kingdom Tabernacle of Restoration church in D.C., is owner of Cars Direct, a buy here, pay here auto lot.

According to the affidavit, Brooks allegedly submitted false tax returns with his application for a PPP loan on behalf of Cars Direct in the amount of $1,556,589.

The Cars Direct loan was approved on May 9, 2020 and funds were deposited into an account associated with Brooks.

Under the terms of the federal CARES Act, PPP funds must be deposited into a separate bank account created specifically for the funds so the IRS can keep track of expenditures.

Brooks, 45, is accused of making multiple cash transfers from the account into his personal bank accounts.

The affidavit states he used the money for "personal expenditures" including credit card bills, restaurant purchases, retail shopping, groceries, mortgage payments, and automotive auctioneers.

Additionally, the feds say Brooks used the funds to purchase 39 used luxury cars for his used car lot.

Brooks allegedly purchased a 2017 Mercedes Benz S Class, two 2017 Infinity Q50s, a 2015 Cadillac Escalade, a 2005 Bentley Continental, a 2018 Tesla Model 3, a 2014 GMC Yukon XL, among other luxury cars.

Thousands of people have been arrested for fraudulently obtaining loans.

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Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office

A Louisiana woman was arrested for refusing to return $1.2 million, mistakenly deposited into her brokerage account, Nola.com reported.

Kelyn Spadoni opened a Fidelity Brokerage Services account about a month before the firm installed "enhancement" software.

Schwab intended to transfer $82.56 into Spadoni's Fidelity account, but she received a jackpot of $1,205,619 instead.

Schwab immediately noticed the error and a request was made to retrieve the funds from Fidelity. But Fidelity sent Schwab a "CASH NOT AVAILABLE" notification, indicating that Spadoni had already withdrawn the cash.

When attempts to contact Spadoni failed, Schwab notified her employer at the Jefferson Parish Sheriff's Office. Spadoni worked there as a 911 dispatcher for four years.

Authorities discovered that Spadoni spent at least $48,000 on a 2021 Hyundai Genesis SUV. Investigators seized the vehicle and recovered about 75% of the stolen loot.

She was arrested and charged with theft valued over $25,000, bank fraud, and illegal transmission of monetary funds. Additionally, she was fired as a 911 dispatcher and is being held in jail on $50,000 bond.

Schwab has filed a lawsuit against Spadoni seeking the return of the remaining funds.

In the lawsuit, Schwab pointed out that Spadoni violated an agreement in the contract that states if a client receives an overpayment of funds, they are required to return the full amount.