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House Democrats impeached President Donald Trump by a majority vote on Wednesday, making him only the 3rd President to be impeached in U.S. history.

Millions of Americans who rejoiced the impeachment last night are waking up this morning to find Trump is still their President.

House Democrats insisted impeachment was necessary to protect the election process. But now House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is attempting to delay the process.

Sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate would signal the start of Trump's impeachment trial. The articles normally would be sent immediately after the impeachment vote.

When asked whether she planned to send over the articles of impeachment on Wednesday night, Pelosi said she wants to see if the Republican-controlled Senate would play "fair" with the rules.

She also declined to name her "trial managers" to present their case for convicting Trump.

"We can't name managers until we see what the process is on the Senate side and I would hope that would be soon," she told reporters. "So far, we haven't seen anything that looks fair to us," she added.

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Pelosi has no control over the Senate which is led by Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY), pictured with Pelosi in 2016.

President Trump has said he wants a long trial so he can call witnesses to testify under oath. His list includes ex-FBI director James Comey and former secretary of state Hillary Clinton.

But McConnell, who has the final say, won't allow Trump to call any witnesses. McConnell wants a quick end to the impeachment trial.

Pelosi appears to be delaying the impeachment trial to prevent the Republicans from abruptly acquitting Trump.

Pelosi referenced McConnell's recent remarks - that he is coordinating with the White House - as proof that McConnell plans to hand Trump a quick victory.

"This is what I don't consider a fair trial," she said. "That leader McConnell has stated that he's not an impartial juror, that he's going to take his cues, in quotes, from the White House, and he's working in total coordination with the White House's counsel's office."