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A lifelong Democrat on the Flint, Michigan City Council is endorsing President Donald Trump for reelection.

Flint City Council member Maurice Davis, 64, announced his endorsement for Trump on Wednesday, saying, "I'm not an Uncle Tom."

Vice President Mike Pence called Davis to the stage during a campaign rally at Michigan's Flint Bishop Airport on Wednesday.

"Vice president of the City Council in Flint. Where are you, Maurice? Let's hear it for Maurice. I'm partial to vice presidents. Thank you, Maurice," Pence said as the crowd applauded.

"Right now, the narrative has been spent: 'President Trump is full of hate.' Let me tell you something, the Democrats are full of hate," Davis said. "I'm tired, I've been a Democrat, I am a Democrat all my life, 64 years. Last four years I voted for Hillary Clinton. This year I decided to go with President Trump. I'm not a bootlicker, I'm not an Uncle Tom. I'm none of those things. I'm somebody that's in a poor, impoverished community."

Davis added, "People are losing everything, and when Mr. Trump says 'What the hell do you got to lose?' he was talking to me. But this is what I got to gain: Instead of being a divided state of America, it's time to be the United States of America.

"We're tired of suffering and nobody give a damn about poor folks. President Trump, they reached out with nothing but love from y'all all over this nation."

Davis is not the first notable Black Democrat to support Trump. The president has been endorsed by Georgia state Representative Vernon Jones, and other Black Democrats.

Former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich and six mayors in Minnesota, all Democrats, are supporting Trump's re-election.
 

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Justice Clarence Thomas is set to swear in Judge Amy Coney Barrett as an associate justice on the U.S. Supreme Court at the White House on Monday night, Oct. 26.

The Republican-controlled Senate will vote Monday night to confirm Barrett's nomination as the 115th Supreme Court justice.

"Justice Clarence Thomas will administer the official Constitutional Oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett at the White House tonight," a senior White House official said Monday.

Judge Barrett sailed through confirmation hearings despite stiff opposition from Senate Democrats who warn she will dismantle ObamaCare and overturn Rose v. Wade.

Senate Democrats tried multiple times to delay Barrett's nomination, but her nomination is guaranteed tonight, despite questions about social distancing in the Rose Garden.

President Trump and his wife Melania reportedly contracted the coronavirus at a White House event in late September.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told reporters Monday morning that the White House would encourage social distancing at the swearing-in event that will be held outdoors, according to The Hill.

"We're tonight doing the best we can to encourage as much social distancing as possible. It will be outdoors if it goes off as planned right now,” Meadows continued.

Trump, who held three campaign rallies in Pennsylvania on Monday, said the swearing-in event would not be a "large event" but "just a very nice event."

Trump nominated Barrett to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after a law professor at Notre Dame said, "Amy Coney is the best student I ever had."

"That's good enough for me," Trump said.
 

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett could be seated on the Supreme Court as early as Monday, Oct. 26, barring a last minute Hail Mary from Senate Democrats.

Democratic senators were noticeably missing when the Judiciary Committee voted to advance Barrett's Supreme Court nomination on Thursday.

There are a few more procedural hurdles in the way before Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court on Monday.

First, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will ask the Senate to move to executive session on Friday afternoon. Once that vote is complete, McConnell will immediately file "cloture" on the nomination.

A cloture petition to stop a filibuster -- which could delay Barrett's nomination -- can't be voted on until Sunday because it requires an intervening day (Saturday), according to Fox News.

Once the cloture petition is approved (on Sunday), Senate Democrats have 30 hours to throw that Hail Mary to disrupt Barrett's nomination.

This is the phase when the Democrats "found" an accuser who claimed she was raped by Justice Brett Kavanaugh when he was a teenager. That strategy delayed Kavanaugh's nomination to the bench.

That isn't likely to happen in Barrett's case.

After the 30 hours expires Monday evening, the crucial and much-anticipated confirmation vote begins Monday night.

If this timetable holds, the Senate could confirm Barrett as the 115th Justice on the Supreme Court around 8:15 p.m. EST Monday.

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MSNBC interviewed three undecided Black women voters in Atlanta the day before the third and final presidential debate. The segment aired on Thursday, Oct. 22, hours before the debate.

The women were passionate and very vocal about what they view as the Democrats taking their votes for granted. They each expressed their opinions that they want to hear what the Democrats are going to do for Black people NOW - not after the election.

Every four years Black people stroll to the polls and get nothing in return for their votes. They then watch as every other community benefits, while the Black community continues to struggle.

If you missed MSNBC's segment last night, I posted a clip below. I also posted a reaction video from a young man who digs deeper into the problem of Democrats courting the Black vote before every election and then ignoring the needs of the Black community for years.
 

 

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Former President Barack Obama hit the campaign trail to drum up support for Joe Biden in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Wednesday, Oct. 21.

The small turnout for Obama was in stark contrast to the huge audiences he once commanded during his two terms as U.S. president.

Biden is polling ahead of President Donald Trump in the battleground state of Pennsylvania that Trump narrowly won in 2016.

But you couldn't tell judging by the light turnout for Obama's speech. Normally, an Obama appearance attracted thousands of adoring supporters. But only about three dozen people turned up at a drive-in campaign rally to hear Obama speak in a Philly park.

AFP via Getty Images

Afterwards, Obama strolled through the neighborhood with his Secret Service protection. He stopped to speak with a handful of Biden/Harris volunteers at a Voter activation Center (VAC).

There, he picked up a megaphone and spoke to the handful of volunteers, who didn't know what to make of the odd scene. The gaggle of reporters and photographers outnumbered the volunteers and onlookers.

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Obama is hoping to motivate young Americans and Black voters in the final stretch of the White House race. Polls show Black male voters are shifting away from the Democratic Party.

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President Donald Trump urged his loyal supporters to put their faith in God, not masks during a campaign stop in Greenville, NC on October 15.

The president, who recently recovered from Covid-19, urged his followers not to rely on face masks, which could potentially expose them to the coronavirus.

A recent study by the CDC found 74% of people who "always" wore face masks contracted the coronavirus.

"Masks, no masks... you can do all you want, but you know, you still need help from the boss," Trump said, as he pointed to the sky.

"Somebody said to me the other day, 'You're the most famous person in the world by far.' I said, 'No I'm not.' They said, 'Who's more famous?' I said, 'Jesus Christ.' I'm not taking any chances..."

Elsewhere in his speech, Trump promised to reopen schools and stop the leftist's "radical indoctrination" of school children.

"We will stop the radical indoctrination of our students and restore patriotic education to our schools. We will teach our children to love our country, honor our history and always respect our great American flag. And we will live by the timeless words of our national motto, 'In God we trust,' and that won't be changed."

Trump received enthusiastic applause from huge crowds when he returned to North Carolina to speak at a rally in Gastonia on Wednesday, Oct. 21.

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He was accompanied by conservative YouTube vloggers Lynnette Hardaway and Rochelle Richardson, aka Diamond and Silk, who led the crowd in chants of "Four more years!"

"Just want you all to know that we are the United States of America -- not China, but the United States of America," they told the crowd.

The North Carolina natives urged the crowd not to listen to the liberal news media, who they referred to as "the enemy of the people."

"People keep saying, "Oh my God, I feel like a slave," said Hardaway. "Well, if you are standing out here in this crowd..., you ain't never been no slave! You don't know nothing about slavery," she said, as the crowd cheered.

She added: "And anybody that feels like a slave, how about you stop voting like a slave and maybe you won't feel like one."

Watch Diamond and Silk's speech in Gastonia, NC below.
 

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Joe Biden's campaign manager admitted the national polls that give Biden a double-digit lead over President Donald Trump are "inflated."

"We're not ahead by double digits. We're just not," tweeted Jen O'Malley Dillon on Thursday. Dillon went on to say the race is "far closer" than a lot of Biden supporters think. "Like a lot closer."

The Biden camp is concerned that the 2020 election will be a repeat of 2016 when Hillary Clinton had double-digit leads over Trump in 12 national polls.

In a Zoom call to supporters, Dillon said, "Please take the fact that we are not ahead by double digits. Those are inflated national public polling numbers."

With a hint of panic in her voice, she urged Democrats to get out and vote.

Some Twitter users expressed anger at the Biden camp for appearing to wave the white flag too early.

One user tweeted: "Are you trying to give me nightmares with this close talk or make sure I vote?"

But others see Dillon's warning as a calculating move to keep the other side off balance.

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Joe Biden says his 1994 crime bill that decimated the Black community was "a mistake."

Biden made the remark during his town hall event with ABC News on Thursday night.

When asked by ABC News' George Stephanopoulos if the bill was a mistake, Biden replied, "Yes, it was. But here's where the mistake came. The mistake came in terms of what the states did locally."

Biden said the bill was created in response to a spike in crime in the inner cities in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

A member of Biden's campaign later took to Twitter to clarify that Biden was referring to the 1986 crime bill, not the controversial 1994 crime bill.

Biden wrote both bills.

The 1986 bill, which Biden also authored, toughened the sentences for possession of rock cocaine, aka "crack", while lessening sentences for people who used powder cocaine.

As Fox News pointed out on Friday, the 1994 crime bill incentivized states to "fill up prisons" in exchange for federal cash in state coffers.

Biden, 77, claims he was tougher on crack users because he was told crack cocaine was worse than powder cocaine.

"We were told by the experts that '[with] crack, you can never go back.' It was somehow fundamentally different. It's not different. It's trapped an entire generation."

A young Black male who participated in the town hall told the presidential candidate that Black males will be sitting at home on Election Day.

A recent poll shows President Trump's support among Black males increased to 45% from just 8% in 2016.

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Black Twitter expressed outrage tonight after Joe Biden equated Black people in America with the criminal justice system.

Biden made the remark during ABC's town hall event on Thursday night.

A Black male asked Biden, "Besides 'you ain't Black,' what do you have to say to young Black voters who see voting for you as further participation in a system that continually fails to protect them?"

Rather than discuss his views on police reform, Biden saw a Black man standing there and immediately equated him with the criminal justice system and being poor.

"In addition to dealing with the criminal justice system to make it fair and make it more decent, we have to be able to put Black Americans in a position to be able to gain wealth," Biden said.
 

Black viewers were understandably upset. One man wrote: "WOW, a black man asks why Joe is worthy of his vote and the FIRST thing Joe mentions is criminal justice system? He just lost my vote."

Another user wrote: "He must have forgotten about his crime bill in 1994 that has sent more black men to prison than all previous crime bills combined."

And a third wrote: "Criminal justice system? Black wealth? So when he thinks of black folks, he thinks poor and criminal... ouch."

Biden's full response to the question is below.

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C-SPAN suspended debate moderator Steve Scully indefinitely after he admitted he lied about having his Twitter account hacked.

Scully, a political editor for C-SPAN, was set to moderate the second presidential debate between President Donald Trump and Senator Joe Biden tonight (Oct. 15).

But the debate was canceled after Trump refused to debate Biden virtually.

Trump and Biden will hold simultaneous town hall events tonight on NBC and ABC at 8 p.m. EST.

Last week, Scully accidentally sent a tweet to Trump's former aide Anthony Scaramucci, asking, "@Scaramucci Should I respond to trump."

Scully asked Scaramucci how to respond to Trump's attacks against him on Twitter.

Trump sent a series of tweets saying the debate was rigged because Scully interned for Biden as a college student in Delaware.

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Frank Fahrenkopf, a co-chairman of the Commission on Presidential Debates, was the first to claim publicly that Scully's Twitter had been hacked.

"Frank is correct," Scully said. "I am also not friends with Anthony Scaramucci."

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But Twitter users dug up old tweets by Scully who claimed his Twitter was hacked in 2012 and 2013.

In a statement to the Associated Press, Scully apologized for lying.

"I falsely claimed that my Twitter account had been hacked," Scully said. "These were both errors in judgement for which I am totally responsible for. I apologize.

Trump tweeted in response to the news:

"I was right again! Steve Scully just admitted he was lying about his Twitter being hacked. The Debate was Rigged! He was suspended from @cspan
indefinitely. The Trump Campaign was not treated fairly by the “Commission”. Did I show good instincts in being the first to know?"

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Twitter tested the powers of Congress by censoring the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee website for sharing a link to the NY Post's bombshell article about Hunter Biden.

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Senator Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) shared a link to the NY Post article on Twitter, and practically dared Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to block the link.

Dorsey took the challenge by blocking or hiding the link from Twitter users.

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An outraged Cruz threatened to issue a subpoena to Dorsey to testify before the judiciary committee next Friday.

Twitter also suspended the Twitter pages of White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany AND the NY Post's official Twitter account.

In a video posted on the judiciary committee website, Cruz said Twitter's censorship "has no precedence in the history of democracy."

"Never before have we seen active censorship of a major press publication," said Cruz. He noted that the NY Post has the 4th largest circulation of any newspaper in the United States.

"Twitter and Facebook and big tech billionaires don't get to censor political speech and actively interfere in the election," he said.
 

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Ice Cube defended himself after his support of Donald Trump sparked a social media meltdown on Wednesday.

President Trump's top adviser Katrina Pierson took to Twitter on Tuesday to thank the legendary rapper for helping the Trump administration to develop Trump's $500 billion economic recovery "Platinum Plan" for the Black community.

"Shoutout to @icecube for his willingness to step up and work with @realDonaldTrump Administration to help develop the #PlatinumPlan... Leaders gonna lead, haters gonna hate. Thank you for leading!"

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The news comes after Ice Cube, born O'Shea Jackson, tweeted on Oct. 11 that he'd met with both parties (Republicans and Democrats), and he revealed that he's not supporting the Democrats in the 2020 election.

That didn't sit well with Ice Cube's followers, whose parents and grandparents are lifelong Democrats.

The backlash on Twitter was swift and unrelenting.

Political commentator Bakari Sellers, a Democrat, tweeted that Ice Cube "fell for something shiny" with the Trump campaign.

"Biden has a black agenda & a racial equity agenda. He has a black female VP who will help oversee COVID recovery for a virus which from a health & economic POV devastated black communities. He will appoint a black woman to the SCOTUS (Supreme Court of the United States) & @icecube fell for something shiny."

Hitting back amid the backlash, Ice Cube insisted he had spoken to both Trump and Biden's teams about his proposed Contract With Black America, which he said "strikes at the heart of racism and presents a blueprint to achieve racial economic justice".

The rap mogul tweeted:

"Facts: I put out the (Contract with Black America). Both parties contacted me. Dems said we'll address the CWBA after the election. Trump campaign made some adjustments to their plan after talking to us about the CWBA."

Ice Cube added that after hearing both sides, he eventually decided to go with Trump, who offered more than lip service.

Cube felt Trump's economic recovery plan would be best for the Black community as a whole. Trump's proposed Platinum Plan aims to create three million new jobs in the Black community over the next four years, and create 500 million new Black-owned businesses by increasing access to financial capital.

Meanwhile, Democratic candidate Joe Biden has previously said he doesn't support reparations for American descendants of slavery.

When one person accused Ice Cube of joining the "darkside", the rapper responded:

"Every side is the Darkside for us here in America. They're all the same until something changes for us. They all lie and they all cheat but we can't afford not to negotiate with whoever is in power or our condition in this country will never change. Our justice is bipartisan."

A recent poll revealed Trump's support among Black men has grown from 8% in 2016 to 45% in 2020.

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Ice Cube has jumped on board the Trump Train.

Trump top adviser Katrina Pierson took to Twitter to thank the legendary rapper for helping the Trump administration to develop the #Platinum Plan.

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The news comes after Ice Cube, born O'Shea Jackson, tweeted on Oct. 11 that he'd met with both parties (Republicans and Democrats), and he revealed that he's not supporting the Democrats in the 2020 election.

Jackson also hyped the $500 billion on the table from Republicans to fund black business startups, which is part of Trump's four-year "Platinum Plan."

According to Vladtv.com, Trump plans to "Increase access to capital in Black communities by almost $500 billion" to be spent in various ways, including creating 3 million new jobs for the Black community and creating 500,000 new Black-owned businesses.

You can see Trump's Platinum Plan in detail below.

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Washington is still buzzing over the vitriolic exchange between CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi on CNN last night.

Blitzer -- who normally carries water for the Democrats -- grew tired of Pelosi's partisan politics.

He demanded to know why the 80-year-old House speaker refuses to accept President Trump's generous offer of $1.8 trillion to put food on the tables of hungry Americans.

Blitzer, 72, began his extraordinary debate by challenging Pelosi to take Trump's deal. Pelosi was defensive when Blitzer quoted Democratic Congressman Ro Khanna, who tweeted:

"People in need can't wait until February. 1.8 trillion is significant & more than twice Obama stimulus. It will allow Biden to start with infrastructure. Obama won in 08 by doing the right thing on TARP instead of what was expedient. Make a deal & put the ball in McConnell court."

With a cunning grin on her face, Pelosi accused Blitzer of being a Republican apologist. "I don't know why you're always an apologist and many of your colleagues are apologists for the Republican position... Ro Khanna, that's nice. That isn't what we're going to do," she said.

But Blitzer pressed on, demanding to know why Pelosi won't take the deal that includes another round of $1,200 stimulus checks for Americans who are out of work.

"...there are millions of Americans out there who can't pay the rent, feed their kids and $1.8 trillion [is a lot]," Blitzer argued.

He added that he spoke with former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, who also told Pelosi to take the deal, "it's not everything you want, but there's a lot there."

"Honest to God, I really can't get over it," Pelosi said. "Because Andrew Yang, he's lovely. Ro Khanna, he's lovely. They're not negotiating this situation... they have no idea..."

Trump previously criticized Pelosi for inserting billions in funding into her $3.4 trillion stimulus package for Democratic mayors and governors who allowed Antifa and Black Lives Matter activists to riot, burn and loot their cities over the summer.

Trump offered half of that -- $1.8 trillion -- including stimulus checks, but the Democrats refused to budge.

As Blitzer and Pelosi continued to argue over each other, Blitzer finally dropped the ball in Pelosi's lap: "Madam speaker, these are incredibly difficult times right now and we'll leave on that note," he said.

But Pelosi clapped back: "No, we'll leave it on the note that you're not right on this, Wolf, and I hate to say that to you."

Pelosi refused to give Blitzer the final word on his own show.

"Thank you for your sensitivity to our constituents' needs," she said sarcastically.

"I am sensitive to them because I see them on the street begging for food, begging for money," Blitzer said warily.

"Have you fed them? We feed them," Pelosi snapped.

Watch the full interview below.

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If Kanye West is out of the race for president, he hasn't gotten the memo. The mega producer unveiled his first campaign ad on Twitter on Monday.

He captioned the ad: "we stepping out on faith."

Standing against a backdrop of a black and white flag, Kanye said, "America. What is America's destiny? What is best for our nation? Our people? What is just, true justice? We have to think about all these things together as a people."

The father of four went on to discuss his vision for America.

"To contemplate our future, to live up to our dream, we must have vision. We as a people will revive our nation's commitment to faith, to what our Constitution calls the free exercise of religion, including, of course, prayer. Through prayer, faith can be restored," he said.

Kanye, 43, hopes to become this nation's 46th president. But he has a steep uphill climb against Donald Trump and his challenger Democratic candidate Joe Biden.

"We as a people are called to a greater purpose than ourselves," said Kanye. "We are not only a beacon to the world, but we should be servants to each other. To encourage each other, to help each other to lift up each other.

"Our fellow Americans, that we may all prosper together. We have to act on faith, with the sure knowledge that we are pursuing the right goals and doing the right things. We will build a stronger country by building stronger families. Families are the building blocks of society, of a nation. By turning to faith, we will be the kind of nation, the kind of people God intends us to be."