The Beverly Hills Police Department is being sued over allegations it targeted Black people on prestigious Rodeo Drive.

The court documents, obtained by TMZ, cites arrests of Black people, in some cases, for minor infractions.

Renowned civil rights attorney Ben Crump filed the lawsuit, claiming the City of Beverly Hills created a police task force to harass Black people for minor violations.

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The result was 106 arrests - of which 105 detainees were Black. The one non-Black detainee was Latino. Crump says the Latino could have easily been mistaken as Black.

2 plaintiffs in the lawsuit -- Jasmine Williams and Khalil White -- say they were riding scooters on the sidewalk a year ago, when they were stopped by Beverly Hills cops.

They were handcuffed and taken into custody. According to the suit, prosecutors later dropped the case.

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The lawsuit claims examples of other "crimes" for which Black people were arrested included roller skating, jaywalking and minor traffic infractions in Beverly Hills.

The lawsuit names BHPD Captain Scott Dowling as a defendant. Dowling allegedly directed officers "to seize, interrogate, use force, falsely arrest, and maliciously prosecute any African-Americans who traveled on Rodeo Drive" with the sole purpose of "keep[ing] out African-Americans, who were deemed as 'criminals.".

The lawsuit references another incident last October involving Salahe Bembury -- VP of Sneakers and Men's Footwear at Versace -- who claimed he was detained by police for jaywalking.

In unrelated news, the model up top is Morning Glory Tai Eisley, a 53-year-old interior decorator and West Coast socialite.

Tai decorated her daughter's college apartment on a budget of less than $2,000.

Tai shared how she decorated the entire apartment on a budget of $2,000 below.
 

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Renowned attorney Benjamin Crump issued a statement on Kenosha District Attorney Michal Gravely's decision not to file charges against Rusten Sheskey, a white police officer who shot a Black man 7 times in the back.

Jacob Blake, 29, was shot in August when Kenosha police officers attempted to detain him on an outstanding warrant for domestic assault and a sex crime.

Sheskey opened fire when Blake opened his driver-side door and reached inside the vehicle. Blake is paralyzed from the waist down.

"We are immensely disappointed in Kenosha District Attorney Michael Gravely's decision not to charge the officers involved in this horrific shooting," Crump said Tuesday.

"We feel this decision failed not only Jacob and his family, but the community that protested and demanded justice."

Gravely pleaded with residents to remain peaceful in light of his decision.

"Rather than burning things down, can moments of tragedy like this be an opportunity to build things?" he asked.

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Antioch PD

Jacob's shooting sparked protests, riots and looting last year. Teenager Kyle Rittenhouse, who is charged with killing two Antifa protesters, pleaded not guilty to all charges at a hearing on Tuesday.

Rittenhouse is currently freed on $2 million bond. A march trial date has been set, but his lawyer said the date is unrealistic.

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NeNe Leakes is still angry at her former bosses at Bravo TV for showing her the door after 11 seasons. NeNe was dismissed previously in season 9 and returned in season 10.

The 53-year-old former original Real Housewives of Atlanta cast member was let go this year for insubordination and her inability or unwillingness to get along with her fellow cast members.

NeNe recently joined an Instagram live chat with her attorney Ben Crump to discuss her issues with Bravo, while urging her followers to boycott the network and stop watching her former show.

NeNe plans to sue Bravo for age and racial discrimination. She claims she was "demoted" and treated differently than her rivals on other 'Housewives' franchises.

"As an original housewife, a lot of these girls were being elevated," she griped.

"I was demoted. And the way I was being demoted is I was given less and less episodes and these girls were given more and more episodes, I was given less."

She continued: "Original housewives across the board, different sets and Beverly Hills, New Jersey, other places they were getting full seasons and I was given less episodes every season."

NeNe shared a link to a petition and asked her Instagram followers to sign the petition, which she created with Married to Medicine's Mariah Huq.

The petition reads:

"This petition is putting Bravo TV on notice that fans of the shows Real Housewives of Atlanta and Married to Medicine hold them accountable for their dirty deeds, particularly as it relates to the unfair and biased treatment they have displayed towards their African American talent, more specifically NeNe Leakes and Mariah Huq."

While some fans were supportive of the former stripper, others expressed their annoyance at the mother-of-two. They reminded her of her truculent ways that led to her downfall.

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The family of Breonna Taylor is losing confidence in the Louisville prosecutor's office after news leaked of a plea deal offered to her ex-boyfriend.

The family's attorney Ben Crump appeared on "TMZ Live" Tuesday to discuss the shocking news about local prosecutors trying to smear Breonna by falsely claiming she was a drug trafficker.

Unfounded rumors have spread that Breonna's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, used her apartment as a stash house for drugs. But no drugs were found in her apartment after she was shot multiple times and killed by three undercover police officers in March.

Walker opened fire on the officers - wounding one - when they executed a no-knock search warrant at Breonna's home on March 13. He initially believed the officers were home invaders.

Walker was arrested on attempted murder and drug charges, which were later dropped and he was released.

The plea deal required Walker to implicate Breonna as a willing participant in his drug activities.

Crump says he's not buying prosecutors' claim the plea deal was merely a draft written early on in negotiations. He tells TMZ it's just another piece of evidence that local authorities were trying to cover up Breonna's killing to protect the police.

Crump says the plea deal proves they were out to sully Breonna's character and that her family doubts Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron will seek justice for Breonna.

Crump tells TMZ, Breonna's family is losing faith in the process, because Cameron, a Black Republican, still has not announced charges against the officers involved in Breonna's killing.

Crump insists the family only wants one thing -- equal treatment under the law.

Meanwhile, Walker has filed a lawsuit seeking monetary damages from the City of Louisville and the Louisville Metro Police for assault, battery, false arrest and imprisonment, malicious prosecution, abuse of process and negligence.

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Jacob Blake's mother Julia Jackson stunned CNN anchor Don Lemon when she apologized to President Donald Trump live on his program Wednesday night.

Lemon is a very vocal Trump critic who frequently uses his platform to attack Trump's policies.

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Blake, 29, was shot 7 times in the back by a Kenosha, Wisconsin police officer on Sunday. He is paralyzed from the waist down and suffered extensive internal injuries.

"He had a bullet go through some or all of his spinal cord," attorney Patrick Salvi said. "He has holes in his stomach, he had to have nearly his entire colon, small intestines removed, damage to kidney and liver, and was shot in the arm."

Salvi said Blake will undergo more surgeries and has a long road to recovery ahead of him. The family plans to file a civil suit against the city and the police department.

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Jackson, accompanied by attorney Benjamin Crump, appeared on Lemon's CNN program via Skype on Wednesday night. She denounced the violent protests and looting in her city.

But she stunned Lemon when she apologized to Trump for missing his phone call. Jackson also apologized for the behavior of a family member who criticized Trump.

"My family and I are very hurt. And quite frankly disgusted," she told Lemon. "And as his mother, please don't burn up property and cause havoc and tear your own homes down in my son's name. You shouldn't do it, people shouldn't do it anyway, but to use my child or any other mother or father's child - our tragedy - to react in that manner, it's just not acceptable," she said.

She said the ongoing violence was not helping her son or anyone else who has suffered from alleged police brutality.

When asked by Lemon whether she had a message for any politicians, including Trump, Jackson apologized to "our President Trump" on behalf of a family member who had said something that was "not kind."

"She is hurting, and I do apologize for that," Jackson said, adding, "That does not reflect our behavior."

She continued, "for President Trump, I'm sorry I missed your call because had I not missed your call, maybe the comments that you made would have been different, and I'm not mad at you at all. I have the most respect for you as the leader of our country."

Recent polls show 37% of Black Americans approve of President Trump. Only 8% of Black voters approved of Trump in 2016.
 

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Breonna Taylor's mother and legal team met with Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron this week.

On Thursday, Aug. 13, Tamika Palmer, Breonna's mother, (center) and co-counsels Benjamin Crump (left) and Lonita Baker (right) held a news conference in front of Louisville City Hall.

Crump said he expects there will be criminal charges against the three plainclothes officers who shot and killed Taylor while executing a no-knock warrant at her home in March. They were searching for a drug suspect who was already in custody.

"I absolutely expect there to be charges based on the evidence," Crump told reporters.

"One hundred and fifty days," Palmer said. "Every day is still March the 13th."

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Taylor, a 26-year-old Black EMT, was asleep in the early hours of March 13 when three cops served a no-knock narcotics search warrant at her home.

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire on the intruders, wounding one of the officers in the leg. The cops returned fire, killing Taylor. Walker was not injured in the shootout. He was arrested but later released without charges.

Former cop Brett Hankison was fired by Louisville Metro Police Department in June. Two other officers — Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove — remain on administrative leave.

Baker said the attorney general didn't reach out to the family earlier because he was fearful it could compromise the investigation.

"It really speaks to why we should not have the police policing themselves," Crump said, "because we lost two months while we were letting them try to figure out how to justify the unjustifiable. And so now we're waiting on ballistics tests over 150 days later?"

The attorney general's office released a statement after the meeting:

"The meeting provided an opportunity for Attorney General Cameron to personally express his condolences to the family. The investigation remains ongoing, and our Office of Special Prosecutions continues to review all the facts in the case to determine the truth."

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An independent autopsy found that George Floyd died from traumatic asphyxia caused by external pressure on his neck and back.

Ben Crump, the attorney for Floyd's family, announced the new findings on Monday. He said an independent autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Baden determined that Floyd, 46, died from "asphyxiation from sustained pressure" that occurred when former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, kneeled on Floyd's neck and back.

An initial autopsy conducted by the state medical examiner found that Floyd died from a combination of preexisting conditions, police restraint, and possible "intoxicants" in his body.

But the family was not satisfied by the initial findings and asked Dr. Baden to conduct an independent autopsy.

Dr. Baden performed a second autopsy on Jeffrey Epstein that determined his death was caused by homicidal violence.

Dr. Michael Baden and Dr. Allecia Wilson performed the autopsy and said there was "neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain," according to Crump's statement. They added that "weight on the back, handcuffs and positioning were contributory factors because they impaired the ability of Mr. Floyd’s diaphragm to function."

Baden said Floyd died at the scene.

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A lawsuit has been filed against the Louisville Metro Police Department after a Black woman was killed by three white officers who forced their way into her home.

Breonna Taylor, an EMT employee, was fatally shot in the early morning hours of March 13 when officers forced their way inside and "blindly fired" after they were met by gunfire inside the home.

Taylor, 26, was asleep in bed with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, who heard a commotion and went to investigate around 12:30 a.m.

The officers were at the wrong house, serving a warrant on a suspect who lived across town and was already in custody.

The cops breached the front door "without knocking and without announcing themselves as police officers," according to the suit filed by Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, who is being represented by attorney Benjamin Crump.

"The defendants then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life," the lawsuit alleges. "Shots were blindly fired by the officers all throughout Breonna's home."

Taylor was shot eight times and died in her bed. Walker, 27, was not hit. He was arrested and charged with assault and attempted murder on a police officer.

The lawsuit states Walker had a license to carry and kept firearms in the home for protection.

Crump is also representing the father of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black male who was shot and killed by 2 white men in Brunswick, Ga. on Feb. 23.

Crump called out the police department for not taking responsibility for the way their officers serve no-knock warrants.

"We stand with the family of this young woman in demanding answers from the Louisville Police Department," he said in a statement on Twitter.

A spokesman for the Louisville police said, "Due to an ongoing internal investigation into this situation, we are not able to comment at this time."

Barbara Dawson

A Florida woman who was forcibly removed from a hospital lay in the parking lot for 18 minutes before a doctor readmitted her. Barbara Dawson, 57, later died of a pulmonary embolism (blood clot in her lung).

Dawson's ordeal at Calhoun-Liberty Hospital in Tallahassee, Florida was recorded by police audio and dash cam video on Dec. 21.

The audio and video were released this week to the family's attorney, Benjamin L. Crump.

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