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Spectrum News 1 released a statement after one of its female reporters complained about harassment on the job.

Brianna Hamblin, a news reporter for Spectrum News 1 in Rochester, New York, took to social media to slam the sexual harassment she receives from men while doing live remotes.

She shared a video that showed her discomfort as two men made remarks to her before she went live on camera.

A Black man said "you look nice by the way" to Hamblin as he walked by. She responded "thank you" before looking down at her cellphone.

Then a white man approached her and asked why she was standing in front of a camera. She told him to watch the news to find out.

He hurled crude remarks at her as he walked away, including "you're sexy as f***" - to which Hamblin said "oh my god".

Her cameraman, Scott Barstow, did nothing to stop the harassment.

Hamblin captioned the video:

"Being hit on and harassed as a woman, especially as a woman reporter out in the field, happens so often you learn how to roll with it or ignore it. This time it happened to be recorded only seconds before my hit. There are A LOT of things wrong with this."

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Twitter/@BriReports

The video went viral late Friday, garnering 3 million views by early Saturday.

Many Twitter users sympathized with Hamblin and suggested she find another job if she feels unsafe.

Spectrum News said in a statement provided to Mediaite:

"We are glad that Brianna wasn't alone in the face of such adversity and we've never been more proud of her. She handled the situation impeccably, remaining calm and professional throughout. We want our employees to feel safe and are constantly working towards achieving that goal."

According to sources, Hamblin is on desk duty while the news station works on a safe and supportive workplace plan for her.
 

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YouTube

Brianna Hamblin has a problem most women would envy: she is blessed with striking beauty and light eyes that make her irresistible to men.

Hamblin's beauty is a blessing and a curse. She complains that she is constantly getting hit on by men at work in the field.

Hamblin is a reporter for Spectrum Local News in Rochester, NY, formerly CBS19.

Despite not dressing provocatively, and not wearing too much makeup, Hamblin is constantly getting hit on.

She took to Twitter to explain her dilemma:

"Being hit on and harassed as a woman, especially as a woman reporter out in the field, happens so often you learn how to roll with it or ignore it. This time it happened to be recorded only seconds before my hit. There are A LOT of things wrong with this."

The video, which includes profanity, is going viral on Twitter.

Hamblin gets cat calls from men even though her cameraman, Scott Barstow, is standing right there.

Scott empathized with Hamblin.

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Instagram

Black Twitter is mourning the sudden death of journalist and influencer Ayesha K. Faines.

The former traffic anchor at News4Jax died unexpectedly on July 2nd. She was best known as a panelist on the web series The Grapevine Show.

She was also a contributor for MTV, Essence, Entertainment Tonight, Hot 97, and The Michael Baisden Show.

Her cause of death was not made public, however Facebook friends say she took the Covid-19 mRNA injections recently.

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After she was fully vaccinated in April, Faines tweeted:

"I had dinner with a friend for the first time in a year Sunday. Today I visited my opinionated octogenarian seamstress who I haven’t seen since last March. The joy! Actually getting ready to wear clothes OUT again Weary face. Things are NOT normal—but a bit closer."

Faines graduated from Yale University and was a competitive salsa dancer. She taught ballet to preteens and she was the founder of her brand Women Love Power, a digital learning company that helped women develop their sense of self separate from a man.

Black Twitter flooded her timeline with condolences.

One user wrote:

"Ayesha K Faines was a Black woman who organized complex information so anyone could understand.

"She had a great dharma as a teacher & she fulfilled her purpose. She followed her own rules & listened to her internal calling. The loss of this woman will be felt for generations."

Another person wrote:

"Never met Ayesha K. Faines a day in my life but I’ve been following her on twitter for years.

"I always loved and appreciated her wisdom on the Grapevine panels. Such a powerful, beautiful and brilliant woman. Prayers for her family & loved ones. R.I.P"

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Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot infuriated the local press corps when she declared she would grant interviews to Black and brown reporters only.

In a letter to the local media, Lightfoot announced her office's new interview policy.

KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI/AFP/Getty Images

"By now, you may have heard the news that on the occasion of the two-year anniversary of my inauguration as Mayor of this great City, I will be exclusively providing one-on-one interviews with journalists of color."

She continued:

"As the first Black woman mayor of Chicago, and the first openly gay mayor, my election in 2019 was hailed for breaking barriers to the halls of power that had existed in our city for generations. I ran to break up the status quo that has failed so many residents across our city.... I have been struck since the first day on the campaign trail back in 2018 by the overwhelming whiteness and maleness of Chicago media outlets, editorial boards, the political press corps, and yes, the City Hall press corps specifically."

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Lightfoot then ordered private media companies to "hire reporters of color—and specifically women of color—to cover Chicago politics, and City Hall in particular."

In a series of tweets, she continued:

"This is exactly why I'm being intentional about prioritizing media requests from [people of color] reporters on the occasion of the two-year anniversary of my inauguration as mayor of this great city... It's time for the newsrooms to do better and build teams that reflect the make-up of our city."

Chris Sweda-Pool via Getty Images

The local news media -- comprised of mostly whites -- howled in protest, but Lightfoot did not back down.

A Hispanic reporter criticized Lightfoot for discriminating against his colleagues:

"I am a Latino reporter @chicagotribune whose interview request was granted for today. However, I asked the mayor’s office to lift its condition on others and when they said no, we respectfully canceled. Politicians don’t get to choose who covers them."

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A Washington Post editor sparked controversy on social media when she said white women are lucky that Black people are "just calling them Karens" and not taking revenge on them.

Karen Attiah, who is Black, tweeted on Sunday that the "lies and tears of white women" caused the murders of Black people in America for decades.

In her tweet, she cited civil rights violations by Karens throughout history, including Emmett Till's murder after a white woman accused the boy of flirting with her.

Attiah then tweeted that white women were "lucky" that "we are just calling them Karens and not calling for revenge."

After surviving the backlash from white men and women who called for her termination, Attiah dug in her heels and tweeted: "Be happy we are calling for equality. And not actual revenge."

Conservative writer Matt Walsh tweeted: "Oh so insulting generalizations based on race and gender are okay now? Or are they only okay for you? Just trying to understand the rules."

Another user tweeted: "You threaten white women with violence. WashPo what is your response? The world is watching and waiting."

The hashtag #fireKarenAttiah began trending on Twitter on Monday.

Karen is a pejorative term to describe entitled white women who snitch on Black people to the police, retail managers, or company HR departments.

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Nearly four dozen Philadelphia Inquirer journalists called out sick after the paper published a "Buildings Matter Too" op-ed.

At least 44 Black journalists called out sick, saying they are tired of being "sick and tired" after the newspaper appeared to compare buildings with Black Lives Matter, the far left group that campaigns against violence and systemic racism.

The opinion piece expressed disapproval of the property damage caused by protests over the death of George Floyd, 46, at the hands of a white policeman who kneeled on his neck for nearly 9 minutes in Minneapolis.

"Yes, they can be rebuilt, while lives are forever lost. But that doesn't mean they will be," read the sub-headline.

The paper issued an apology on Wednesday, but it wasn't enough for the Black journalists who say the headline reflects the racial disharmony at the paper.

The journalists said an apology doesn't cut it when the culture of racism and lack of empathy persists at the Inquirer.

"As journalists of color, we do more than report on the community — we are the community," staffers said in an open letter Wednesday to the paper's top execs. "We do our best to give the community a platform to be heard. We strive to represent the voice of the people. And we are tired."

The Black writers went on to say they are tired of the "hasty apologies and silent corrections," of endless "workshops and worksheets and diversity panels," and of "working for months and years to gain the trust of our communities — only to see that trust eroded in an instant by careless, unempathetic decisions."

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A Black journalists delegation headed by former CNN political contributor Roland S. Martin has put CNN on notice for its lack of Black executives in leadership positions at the cable news network.

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