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Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot infuriated the local press corps when she declared she would grant interviews to Black and brown reporters only.

In a letter to the local media, Lightfoot announced her office's new interview policy.

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"By now, you may have heard the news that on the occasion of the two-year anniversary of my inauguration as Mayor of this great City, I will be exclusively providing one-on-one interviews with journalists of color."

She continued:

"As the first Black woman mayor of Chicago, and the first openly gay mayor, my election in 2019 was hailed for breaking barriers to the halls of power that had existed in our city for generations. I ran to break up the status quo that has failed so many residents across our city.... I have been struck since the first day on the campaign trail back in 2018 by the overwhelming whiteness and maleness of Chicago media outlets, editorial boards, the political press corps, and yes, the City Hall press corps specifically."

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Lightfoot then ordered private media companies to "hire reporters of color—and specifically women of color—to cover Chicago politics, and City Hall in particular."

In a series of tweets, she continued:

"This is exactly why I'm being intentional about prioritizing media requests from [people of color] reporters on the occasion of the two-year anniversary of my inauguration as mayor of this great city... It's time for the newsrooms to do better and build teams that reflect the make-up of our city."

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The local news media -- comprised of mostly whites -- howled in protest, but Lightfoot did not back down.

A Hispanic reporter criticized Lightfoot for discriminating against his colleagues:

"I am a Latino reporter @chicagotribune whose interview request was granted for today. However, I asked the mayor’s office to lift its condition on others and when they said no, we respectfully canceled. Politicians don’t get to choose who covers them."

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A Washington Post editor sparked controversy on social media when she said white women are lucky that Black people are "just calling them Karens" and not taking revenge on them.

Karen Attiah, who is Black, tweeted on Sunday that the "lies and tears of white women" caused the murders of Black people in America for decades.

In her tweet, she cited civil rights violations by Karens throughout history, including Emmett Till's murder after a white woman accused the boy of flirting with her.

Attiah then tweeted that white women were "lucky" that "we are just calling them Karens and not calling for revenge."

After surviving the backlash from white men and women who called for her termination, Attiah dug in her heels and tweeted: "Be happy we are calling for equality. And not actual revenge."

Conservative writer Matt Walsh tweeted: "Oh so insulting generalizations based on race and gender are okay now? Or are they only okay for you? Just trying to understand the rules."

Another user tweeted: "You threaten white women with violence. WashPo what is your response? The world is watching and waiting."

The hashtag #fireKarenAttiah began trending on Twitter on Monday.

Karen is a pejorative term to describe entitled white women who snitch on Black people to the police, retail managers, or company HR departments.

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Nearly four dozen Philadelphia Inquirer journalists called out sick after the paper published a "Buildings Matter Too" op-ed.

At least 44 Black journalists called out sick, saying they are tired of being "sick and tired" after the newspaper appeared to compare buildings with Black Lives Matter, the far left group that campaigns against violence and systemic racism.

The opinion piece expressed disapproval of the property damage caused by protests over the death of George Floyd, 46, at the hands of a white policeman who kneeled on his neck for nearly 9 minutes in Minneapolis.

"Yes, they can be rebuilt, while lives are forever lost. But that doesn't mean they will be," read the sub-headline.

The paper issued an apology on Wednesday, but it wasn't enough for the Black journalists who say the headline reflects the racial disharmony at the paper.

The journalists said an apology doesn't cut it when the culture of racism and lack of empathy persists at the Inquirer.

"As journalists of color, we do more than report on the community — we are the community," staffers said in an open letter Wednesday to the paper's top execs. "We do our best to give the community a platform to be heard. We strive to represent the voice of the people. And we are tired."

The Black writers went on to say they are tired of the "hasty apologies and silent corrections," of endless "workshops and worksheets and diversity panels," and of "working for months and years to gain the trust of our communities — only to see that trust eroded in an instant by careless, unempathetic decisions."

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A Black journalists delegation headed by former CNN political contributor Roland S. Martin has put CNN on notice for its lack of Black executives in leadership positions at the cable news network.

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