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Black Twitter expressed their disappointment after Lil Nas X dropped his LGBT-themed music video for "Industry Baby."

The provocative music video featured naked Black men twerking in a shower. Their private parts blurred to get past the FCC censors.

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Nas X is the first rapper to feature an all-Black ghey male cast twerking in his music video. Such a spectacle would not have been possible 20 years ago.

Some parents objected to Nas X being promoted to their children. Nas X has a large following of children and adolescents who buy his books and music.

Here's how Black Twitter responded to the music video:
 


 

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Twitter

Black Americans expressed their frustration on social media after House Speaker agreed with Pres. Joe Biden saying "the Latino community is the future of America."

Pelosi made the statement during her weekly press conference on Thursday, July 22.

"Well, you want to talk politics? Yeah, obviously the Latino community is the future of America," Pelosi said. She then praised the congressional Hispanic caucus for going door-to-door to get out the vote for Biden in the presidential election.

Black Twitter was not happy.

One Twitter user wrote:

"Thank you to the Hispanic Caucus for proving to me that Latino issues take precedence over Black issues in America."

Another user tweeted:

"Damn. Talk about benign neglect. Shameful. Yet they depend on Blacks to get them in office. We are now relegated to 4th class citizenship."

And a third person wrote:

"They have to since Latinos don't blindly vote for them 90% every election. They have to work for they're votes so they are. Meanwhile they don't have to do anything for the Black vote."

 

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"The Breakfast Club" co-host Rashawn "DJ Envy" Casey is under attack for comments he made regarding the fatal shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant.

Ma'Khia was gunned down by a Columbus, Ohio police officer on April 20 when she attempted to stab a woman during a fight over an unmade bed at a foster group home.

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Facbook

DJ Envy chose the side of reason and facts during a debate with co-host Charlamagne the god, who allowed anger to rule his emotions.

After the show, Black Twitter went into a frenzy, attacking DJ Envy and calling him a sellout.

"I understand people are upset and they have the right to be — but what I don't like is this cancel culture, when they try to cancel somebody for an opinion," DJ Envy tells Page Six.

"It doesn't hurt me ... because people are mad about what's going on and I'm mad and upset as well. But I know who's on my side and who's not. I know who tries to help the community and who doesn't. We sit here and raise money every year for organizations that fight against this. I help our community with financial freedom and learning about buying their own homes, and their own investment properties. So people can have financial freedom so they can use their own money."

"Every case is different," Envy told Page Six. "And in this case, if I pull up to a scene and see a girl chasing another girl about to stab a girl, my job as a police officer is to make sure that girl doesn't get killed. And the law allows me to stop that killing or that stabbing by any means necessary. That's what the law allows me to do, on both sides.

"The whole situation is tragic and it's sad because that system failed that young lady. The fact that she's out there fighting at 16 with a grown woman. The fact that the older man seen in the video would rather kick the girl on the ground and join the fight instead of stopping the fight, all these things come together and the system failed that girl and it is sad."

He added, "Everybody's saying [the police] shoot first, but he possibly saved that [other girl's] life ... if she would've stabbed her who knows if she would've lived. She could have got cut in the throat, in the face, we just don’t know what could happen."

DJ Envy is the son of a retired NYPD cop, and a victim of police harassment. He said he "has experienced with both sides of the spectrum."

Watch video of DJ Envy and Charlamagne's debate below.
 

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Black Twitter looked like a crime scene after Black women found out rapper Bobby Shmurda is booed up with a Caucasian woman.

Instagram blogger Kollege Kidd shared a photo of the happy couple on Instagram. He captioned a photo of Shmurda and his new love: "Bobby Shmurda coolin with his rumored girlfriend."

Shmurda is best known for his viral dance called "The Shmoney" which he debuted in his "Hot Boy" music video in 2014.

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"Hot Boy" was certified Platinum in the United States and is Shmurda's only top 10 single on the Billboard charts.

On September 2, 2016, Shmurda plead guilty to weapons possession and conspiracy charges and was sentenced to seven years in prison.

Caucasian women are known to write Black prisoners with marriage proposals.

He was released from prison on February 23, 2021. Migos rapper Quavo Huncho leased a private jet to fly Shmurda to Atlanta.

Shmurda's Twitter timeline is in shambles.

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CRYSTAL PIX / BACKGRID

You can't please everyone. So-called "fat feminists" are furious with singer Lizzo after she embarked on her weight loss journey without seeking their permission.

Full-figured women who are happy in their bodies took to social media to rebuke the 32-year-old pop star after she confessed to hating her body and despising how she looked in a mirror.

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In a TikTok video Lizzo said, "I came home, and I took my clothes off to take a shower, and I just started having all of these really negative thoughts about myself. Like, you know, 'What's wrong with me?'... 'Why am I so disgusting?' and hating my body."

Fat feminists on Twitter called Lizzo out and accused her of being "fatphobic."

One Twitter user wrote:

"The problem here now, is that fatphobics and horrible people will now use Lizzo's weight loss as a tool to further shame and abuse fat women who are happy in their bodies."

In a now-deleted tweet, user Leah wrote:

"my heart hurts with all my fat peers today. even though she won't say it and will probably try to excuse it, I'm sorry that @lizzo did that to us. we are worthy and what she posted was so f***ed. if you are triggered and upset by it I and right there with you."

Leah, who is Caucasian, apologized after Black Twitter descended on her timeline and attacked her -- as if morbid obesity is a Black thing.

One Black Twitter user wrote: "stay out of black folks business."

Another user wrote: "girl remove that blm photo from ur header and while ur at it stay [out] of blk folk business. foreva!!"

A third user tweeted:

"STAY OUT OF BLACK FOLKS BUSINESS IN GENERAL. Youre not an ally, youre a undercover enemy. Selfish, controlling, only care about BW when they're fat or fir your agenda I guess. Youre just like these Republican WM and its people just like you that gives libs a bad rep."

Leah responded to the criticism:

"The biggest thing is that I am genuinely sorry, and I had no idea just how much I was feeding into the racism of Black women being so highly scrutinized and held to such high standards. I should’ve, I can, and I will do better."

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50 Cent's black card was revoked and he was unanimously canceled by Black Twitter after he endorsed his friend Donald Trump in the upcoming presidential election.

The fallout continues after the rap mogul announced he was voting for Trump due to challenger Joe Biden's insane tax plan.

Fiddy was outraged that Biden plans to hike the tax rate in New York to 62%.

"WHAT THE F***! (VOTE For TRUMP) IM OUT," Fiddy wrote on Instagram on Monday. He added: "I don't care Trump doesn't like black people 62% are you out of ya f****ing mind."
 

The reaction on social media was swift. Outraged L.A.-based Civil rights activist Najee Ali, director of Project Islamic Hope, canceled his Starz subscription and urged everyone to cancel their Starz subscriptions as well.

50 Cent is executive producer of the drama series "Power" on Starz.

Ali blamed Trump for the weakening coronavirus pandemic and called the president a "racist".

"Trump is a racist president who has never condemned white supremacy but embraced it," Ali wrote on his website. "For "50 Cent" to openly embrace a racist like Trump sends a horrible message. I refuse to support "50 Cent" or any celebrity whose endorsement of Trump is more important than the health and welfare of Black people."

Black Twitter also sounded off on 50 Cent and other Black notables who support Trump.

One Black Twitter user wrote: "Men like Kanye West, Ice Cube, and 50 Cent aren't Black leaders, they are nothing more than opportunistic puppets who would sell their own people into slavery for a profit."


Another user tweeted: "Liberals just 'revoked 50 Cent's 'black card.'"


And Larry Elder tweeted: "When it comes to taxes, it looks like 50 Cent pretty quickly figured out that he doesn't want to pay 50 percent. #Trump2020."

But Trump's son, Eric Trump, was pleased with the rapper's endorsement. He tweeted a photo of 50 Cent and fellow rapper Ice Cube sitting side-by-side wearing Trump caps. Eric called them "Two great, courageous, Americans!"

Twitter tagged Eric's tweet, "manipulated media."

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Dionne Warwick made a surprise appearance during Gladys Knight and Patti LaBelle's Verzuz battle on Sunday night, as the trio performed their song "Superwoman."

Gladys and Patti, both 76, faced off during the social media clash, performing their respective hits, as 600,000 viewers tuned in for their battle, including Mariah Carey and Janet Jackson.

The musical powerhouses delighted fans with their vocal talents and their good natured exchange between songs.

But it was Dionne's appearance at the end of the clash that drew the most attention, with the 79-year-old joining Gladys and Patti to perform "Superwoman" - their 1991 single - and "That's What Friends Are For," which Dionne won the Grammy for song of the year and best pop performance by a duo or group with vocals in 1986.

"I haven't seen you guys in so long," Dionne commented as she joined Gladys and Patti on stage.

Other notable points during the evening included Patti kicking off her shoes to perform "Somewhere Over the Rainbow," and also saying, "We all have to vote. Period, pooh."

The phrase comes from Black ghey slang and has gained popularity, thanks to hip-hop star Jaydawayda releasing a song called "Period Pooh" in 2019.

Gladys and Patti also gave shoutouts to Michelle Obama, saying she will be the next Black president.

Black Twitter reacted enthusiastically to the battle on Sunday. Many of them weren't born when the songs were released on vinyl and then CDs.

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Adele sparked outrage and concern on social media when she posted a photo that shows her wearing a Jamaican flag bikini top and her hair braided in bantu knots.

The 32-year-old pop singer snapped the photo at London's Notting Hill Carnival, according to the photo caption.

Adele further enraged Americans when she left a comment that appeared to mock the Jamaican dialect during the Monica vs Brandy Verzuz battle on Monday night.

"Wah Gwaan! Yow gyal, yuh look good enuh," she wrote. The rough translation is: "What's going on! Wow girl, you look good you know."

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There are plenty of white Jamaicans on the island, but Adele is not one of them. It is considered offensive to native Jamaicans when non-Jamaicans attempt to speak Patois or Patwa and end up butchering the native language.

The reaction on Twitter was mixed as many defended the pop star, saying the message appeared to be Photoshopped.

While some claimed the singer was profiting off black culture, many pointed out the star grew up in Tottenham, London and has been surrounded by black culture all her life.

Supermodel Naomi Campbell, whose mother was born in Jamaica, commented on Adele's Instagram photo with two love heart emojis and two pictures of the Jamaican flag.

While British journalist Piers Morgan said the entire scandal was "absolute guff" on Monday's Good Morning Britain talk show.
 

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Black Twitter isn't feeling Jay Z's bars on Pharrell Williams' new track titled "Entrepreneur," set for release on Friday, Aug. 21.

The 50-year-old rapper teamed up with Pharrell, 47, for the new track, released in conjunction with the new TIME magazine issue "The New American Revolution" curated by Pharrell.

The issue celebrates the Black revolution in America. "I couldn't be more grateful to curate :The Next American Revolution" -- a special issue of @TIME Magazine that envisions a Black Future in an America where all people are actually created equal," Pharrell tweeted.

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Jay Z, left, is pictured in concert with his wife Beyonce, right, and Pharrell in South Africa in 2018.

In a snippet of the song on Apple Music, Jay Z urges supporting Black businesses and being Black business owners.

But he got off on the wrong foot by diminishing Black Twitter.

"Black Twitter, what's that? When Jack gets paid, do you? For every one Gucci, support two FUBU’s."
 

Black Twitter was quick to denounce Jay Z for being out of touch with the times.

One Twitter user wrote:

"Jay Z today: Why y'all on black twitter? And buying Gucci instead of supporting Fubu?

"Jay Z four months from now: I'm very pleased to announce I'm collaborating with Gucci on their black twitter line."

Others chime in, knocking Jay Z for being too preachy about buying Black when he supported white brands in his music for decades.

"jay z for 25 years: “gucci, louis v, richard mille, goyard, fendi, louboutin, cartier, mercedes, in the box seats with the mink on brushing shoulders with the owners”

jay z in 2020: "buy more fubu."

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Black Twitter's cancel culture upended Doja Cat's career overnight. The 24-year-old L.A. native saw her career evaporate into thin air after video leaked that showed her chatting with white supremacists.

In the video, the biracial singer is seen flirting with the white men in an alt-right chat room. At one point she blurts out "ni**er" while the men laugh. Doja, whose mother is Jewish-American, seemed comfortable using racial slurs.

After the clip began making the rounds online, fans also dug up one of her songs, believed to be from 2015, entitled "Dindu Nuffin" - which is known to be a racial slur for Black criminals, who claim to be innocent after facing police brutality.

She sings on the track: "How much nothing can a dindu do / If a dindu, dindu nothin' / How much money could a dindu make / If a dindu did all the things that you wish to."

Some believe that the song was targeted at Sandra Bland, a Black woman who died in police custody in 2015.

Doja responded to the backlash late Sunday night. Some say her explanation is too little, too late.

Question: Do you forgive Doja, or is she still canceled?

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