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A man who allegedly shot his 6-year-old neighbor and was released on $10,000 bond is back in police custody after public outcry.

Ryan Le-Nguyen allegedly shot 6-year-old Coby Daniel after yelling at the child for playing in his yard on June 6 in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

A judge released Le-Nguyen from jail on $10,000 bond, sparking public backlash and generating global headlines.

Le-Nguyen turned himself in to police on Thursday after his bail was increased to a $100,000 cash bond. Le-Nguyen is required to pay the full amount of the bail.

Coby, who was shot in the arm, is expected to recover fully. He told police he went into Le-Nguyen's yard to retrieve his bicycle and Le-Nguyen attempted to hit him with a sledgehammer.

"He tried hitting me with a sledgehammer but that's not going to work because I'm too fast," Coby told FOX 2 News.

Surveillance video obtained by FOX 2 showed the boy yelp in pain after a gunshot is heard.

The boy's father, Arnold Daniel, told FOX 2 he is "trying to figure out how he got a bond so low for trying to kill my kid."
 

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A man who allegedly shot a 6-year-old neighbor and was released on $10,000 bond will return to jail after his bond is canceled.

A prosecuting attorney is seeking to jail 29-year-old Ryan Le-Nguyen, who shot 6-year-old neighbor Coby Daniel in the arm on June 6 in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Le-Nguyen allegedly shot the child through an open window.

Le-Nguyen was jailed after the shooting incident, but he was released on $10,000 bond on Tuesday and ordered to stay away from his home. He is currently staying with a relative.

"We have filed an immediate emergency motion seeking to cancel the defendant's bond, to return him to custody and to have a new bond hearing at which we can once again advocate for stringent conditions that we believe ensure public safety," said Eli Savit, the Washtenaw County prosecutor.

A hearing on the bond revocation is scheduled for Thursday, June 10, according to the Detroit News.

Coby, who is expected to recover fully, told police he went into Le-Nguyen's yard to retrieve his bicycle and Le-Nguyen attempted to hit him with a sledgehammer for playing in his yard.

Surveillance video obtained by FOX 2 showed the boy yelp in pain after a gunshot is heard.

The boy's father, Arnold Daniel, told FOX 2 he is "trying to figure out how he got a bond so low for trying to kill my kid."

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A Latina mother who recorded her daughter being paddled by an elementary school principal has filed a lawsuit against the school district.

Melissa Carter, principal of Central Elementary School in Clewiston, is accused of paddling a 6-year-old female student for damaging a school computer.

The unidentified mother was called to the school on April 13 to pay a $50 fee for the damaged computer. She said when she arrived to pay the fee, she saw her daughter, the principal, and a school clerk waiting inside the principal's office.

She said Carter and the clerk escorted her and her daughter to the child's classroom where Carter beat the minor child with a wooden paddle in front of other students.

The mother began secretly recording as Carter and the clerk bent her daughter over a table.

The mother said she didn't understand what was happening due to a language barrier. She said she recorded the paddling because she didn't think anyone would believe the cruelty taking place at the school.

"The hatred with which she hit my daughter, I mean it was a hatred that, really I've never hit my daughter like she hit her," the mother told WINK News in Spanish. The mom said she never hits her daughter at home.

She said her child suffers from psychological and emotional disorders, as well as physical bruises from the paddling.

The video sparked outrage after it was posted on social media. many were shocked that this archaic, outdated mode of punishment was still occurring in public schools.

The mother pressed assault charges, and the Clewiston Police Department has turned the investigation over to the State Attorney's Office.

School district officials said Carter's actions went directly against the anti-corporal punishment policy in the school district.

Paddling and other forms of cruel corporal punishment have been outlawed in most civilized jurisdictions. But there are still pockets of resistance in the Deep South.

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Maricopa County jail

A 32-year-old Arizona woman was arrested and charged with assault after she beat her three children for not wearing face masks.

Police were called to Michelle Boone's Wickenberg home Saturday night. Officers were told that she punched one child in the face, kicked a second child and picked up a minor child by the neck for not wearing masks despite all three children testing positive for the virus.

Charging documents obtained by AZ Central show Boone is facing three counts of child abuse, three counts of assault, disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Boone fled the home before police arrived but officers found hr walking down the street and arrested her, according to the documents.

Police say refused their command to stop and then fought them like a man when they tried to arrest her. She stopped resisting after an officer tased her with a stun gun.

She was transported to the Maricopa County jail and released on $5,000 bond.

Boone is seen smiling in her mugshot photo with a blue face mask tucked under her chin.

Court documents show Boone is no stranger to law enforcement. She was arrested for three previous incidents of domestic violence.

Studies have shown face masks do not stop the transmission of the coronavirus. A recent CDC report showed 74% of people who always wear masks still tested positive for Covid-19.

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Fulton County Sheriff

A Georgia woman has been charged in the brutal beating death of a 2-year-old girl she was babysitting.

Sandy Springs police say Kirstie Hannah Flood, 29, beat little Fallon Fridley to death in the Sandy Springs apartment the toddler shared with her mother, Kristin Fridley Gantt.

Flood was arrested two days after Fallon was found unresponsive in the apartment.

Gantt, an employee at Furkids Animal Rescue and Shelters, told Channel 2 Action News the babysitter called her at work, crying hysterically, and told her the toddler fell and hit her head on playground equipment.

Fallon was rushed to a Children's Healthcare of Atlanta location, where she was pronounced dead, according to police.

Doctors told police the child's injuries were inconsistent with Flood's story.

The coroner's report revealed a massive skull fracture and lacerations to Fallon's liver, spleen and colon. The autopsy showed the girl "suffered severe injuries that resulted in her death during her care by the suspect," Sandy Springs police said Tuesday, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Flood had been Fallon's babysitter since August, and she was a family friend for years. Gantt couldn't comprehend that Flood was capable of such brutality.

Apparently, Flood was also unaware of the murderous rage that lurked inside her.

Police obtained a search warrant for her Flood's phone and found internet searches for "what does it mean to have a sudden urge to beat a child that's not yours," and "what type of people enjoy abusing other people's children" according to the warrant.

Flood, who is from Smyrna, was arrested five times before her 21st birthday, according to Cobb County records obtained by the AJC. The charges ranged from battery to alcohol use and drug possession.

Flood is being held in the Fulton County Jail without bond.

A GoFundMe page created for funeral expenses raised nearly $32,000 as of Tuesday, Dec. 15.

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A Tallahassee, Florida woman is charged with brutally beating a 3-year-old boy to death with a tire iron.

Te’Lea Jefferson, 23, was arrested Tuesday, Oct. 20 and charged with murder and aggravated battery after she confessed to beating the boy with a tire iron for climbing on a bathroom sink to brush his teeth.

Jefferson, who lived with the child's mother and his 6-year-old brother, first told investigators the toddler fell off the sink and hit his head on the toilet.

But emergency room staff told police the boy's injuries -- including severe lacerations to his face and hands and bruises on his arms and legs, were "not consistent" with falling off a sink, court records show.

Jefferson, who told police she was in a domestic relationship with the boys' mother, later confessed that she attacked the toddler with a tire iron after he refused her demands to get off the sink.

Jefferson said his refusal to get down off the sink angered her. She went into a bedroom and retrieved a tire iron from a tool box.

She then returned to the bathroom and threw the tire iron at the boy, striking him in the face, according to the police report.

Jefferson admitted to hitting the boy several more times with the tire iron and she recalled seeing blood gushing from his body.

Jefferson's girlfriend hid the bloody murder weapon outside the home.

Police believe the child died in the home before Jefferson brought him to the hospital on Oct. 19 with severe trauma to his face and head. He was unresponsive and pronounced dead upon arrival at the hospital at 7 p.m.

Hospital staff called 911 to report the "suspicious death" of a child.

According to the affidavit -- based on the timeline of events -- she should have arrived at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital's emergency room around 4 p.m. Jefferson confessed after investigators confronted her about the 3-hour gap in her story.

The male-identified lesbian told police she disciplined the boys when they misbehaved. She said the 3-year-old "often required more strikes or blows than his older" brother, according to the affidavit.

Jefferson is being held without bond in the Leon County Detention Facility.

At her first court appearance on Oct. 21, Jefferson said she preferred to hire her own attorney rather than be assigned a public defender, even though she qualified for public assistance, WCTV reported.

Public defender Nancy Showalter said she spoke with Jefferson and her mother, and the family would rather hire a private attorney.

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Instagram

A video of a father and stepmother disciplining their disobedient daughter is going viral on social media.

The video has sparked debate over whether the father and stepmother are being abusive to the girl.

The video shows a father apparently abusing his teenage daughter who allegedly stole something and called his wife a "fat a** b*tch".

The video went viral after celebrities such as Lil Scrappy posted it on social media.

Some are calling for child protective services to investigate.

Update:

The girl is in the custody of rapper Waka Flocka's mom, Debra Antney, who is reportedly related to her. See the videos below.
 


 

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A Pensacola man was arrested after he brutally beat his minor child with a belt for making bad grades, according to the Escambia County Sheriff's Office.

Darryl McRae, 33, was charged with child cruelty and child abuse. He is being held without bond in the Escambia County Jail.

The incident came to light after the boy approached a school resource officer and said his father gave him a "whoopin'" on Sunday because of his grades.

The resource officer observed bruises and welts all over the child's back and leg. A school counselor contacted the police and DCF took the boy into custody.

According to a police report obtained by WEAR TV, the boy said McRae struck him 15 times with a belt. McRae reportedly beat the boy multiple times in the past with a belt, and other objects.

McRae's arrest sends a message to other parents that beating children with belts, extension cords, and similar objects is against the law and punishable by prison time.

The law understands that raising children is hard work and takes a lot of patience and self-discipline. But child abuse will not be tolerated.

Parents are urged to take parenting classes to teach them more effective ways to discipline children and to manage their own emotions and anger.

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Photos: Atlanta PD

A mom who abandoned her 14-year-old special needs son at an Atlanta hospital may not face prison time.

Atlanta police charged Diana Elliot, 37, with child cruelty after she abandoned her special needs son outside Grady Memorial Hospital on the cold night of Dec. 4.

Security cameras captured Elliott escorting the smiling teenager into the lobby of the hospital and then leaving the scene in a red minivan.

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Photos: Atlanta PD

The teenager, who is unable to communicate verbally, wandered outside looking for his mother after she left.

A kindhearted nurse on her lunch break noticed the boy standing outside the hospital. She escorted him back inside the hospital where he was cared for until police arrived.

"It was fortunate there was a nurse at Grady hospital, who was on her break, who went outside and happened to notice this young man outside," said police Lt. Jeff Baxter. "He needed help and shouldn't have been left like that," Baxter told Channel 2 News.

The teenager is now in the custody of the Georgia Division of Family and Child Services, according to Channel 2 News.

Elliott was tracked down by police and arrested on Wednesday. She was booked into the Fulton County Jail on felony child cruelty charges.

She told police she was overwhelmed caring for her son and her three other children.

Parents with special needs kids attended Elliott's bond hearing on Thursday. Her attorney - a parent to three special needs children himself - represented her pro bono (for free). The attorney believes the boy may have Down syndrome.

The judge said she would rather see Elliott get the childcare help she needs rather than send her to prison.

Georgia's "Safe Haven" law allows overwhelmed mothers to leave newborns at hospitals, fire stations, police stations and sheriff's offices without facing prosecution.

The law does not permit abandoning toddlers, adolescents or teenagers anywhere in Georgia.

Parents of unwanted adolescents or teenagers are urged to call DFACS, or give up their parental rights instead of abandoning their older children.

"It's rare that you see somebody older than a newborn being abandoned - it's very rare," Atlanta police spokesman Carlos Campos told WSB-TV.

"Our message is that we definitely understand that parents can feel overwhelmed by special needs children - that's something that everyone can empathize with," Campos said. "But leaving them unattended is not the proper solution. The child was found outside, cold and hungry, and that's just not an appropriate way to deal with something like this."