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Kandi Burruss says NeNe Leakes once called her the racial slur "c**n". The former "Real Housewives of Atlanta" star -- who quit to star in her own show, "Kandi & the Gang," on Bravo -- revealed the incident to Raquel Harper on the "It's Tricky" podcast on Wednesday.
 
RELATED: Twitter Reviews ‘Kandi and the Gang’ Reality TV Series
 
Kandi insisted her old castmate called her a "c**n" when they had beef right before Bravo took Kandi's side and gave NeNe the boot.

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At the time, NeNe accused Kandi of creating "fake beef" for a plot line.

In May 2020 NeNe wrote:

"I will NOT let the fake beef YOU made up to stop me from wishing you a Happy Birthday & posting my favorite pic of us Kandi. Everybody go wish @kandi a Happy Birthday! Then tune into #RHOA to watch Kandi have the fakest, want some smoke, beef wit Nene segment at 8pm TONIGHT on @bravotv."

NeNe, who will be featured on BET's reboot of "College Hill: Celebrity Edition," announced she was departing RHOA in the summer of 2020.

Their longstanding beef may have something to do with Kandi being favored by Bravo TV's executives.

When Raq asked Kandi to explain where the bad blood comes from, Kandi claimed she doesn't know why NeNe hates her.

However, she guessed that it may have something to do with their respective success on the network, or NeNe's lack of success, according to TMZ.

In September 2020, NeNe accused Bravo exec Andy Cohen of being racist: "The racist is the master manipulator! They using me for ratings like they have always done."

In a separate interview on SiriusXM Urban View's The Clay Cane Show, Kandi said she disagreed with NeNe's allegations that Cohen was "racist".

"[A]t that time, we still had like, four or five of us, who had been there for a while, making some real good money," said Kandi.

"It's not like one person is doing well on the show, multiple women on this show are doing really well... It's certain things that you may not like, certain things that you may want to try to do better, but, overall, to say that they were racist – I didn't agree with that at all."

 

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Paula Patton opened up about her racial identity in a sit-down interview with SiriusXM's "The Clay Cane Show."

Paula, whose mother is white and father is Black, says she's "grateful" for her mother, but the term "biracial" offends her sensibilities.

"I find [the term] biracial offensive. It's a way for people to separate themselves from African Americans, a way of saying, 'I'm better than that,'" She told Cane.

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"That's not to say that I don't embrace my mother and everything that she's brought to my life, but it was my mother who let me know, 'The world is going [to] see you as Black and that is who you are. So don't have any questions about that."

Paula continued:

"I'm very grateful for her... The politics of race in our country are such that when [some]one wants to make it very clear that they're not Black, it's a way to keep them separate from Black people. We know, we've had a long history in this country of it not being popular to be Black, to be honest with you. I've always found that to be an offensive term. I'm Black and I embrace it, that's my family."

Paula reprises her role as entertainment attorney Daniella Hernandez in The BET+ series "Sacrifice," which is streaming now.

Watch the interview below.
 

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Kirk Franklin says anti-LGBT+ bullying has no place in the church. Particularly since 80% of male church choir members are same-sex oriented.

Franklin spoke up about homophobia in the church during a recent interview on a Sirius XM radio show.

The Grammy Award-winning gospel singer, best known for his crossover hit song "Stomp," told host Clay Cane, "What is very important to understand is that the pulpit is not a bullying place, and we have to also understand that no group of people are monolithic. No Black person, all Black people do not think the same, do not process the same. Not all LGBTQIA+ people all think and process the same."

The 51-year-old married father of 4 battled le ghey rumors for most of his career. He encouraged church members not to "weaponize" the Holy Bible against LGBT+ people.

"I have some close gay friends who make decisions based on their interpretation of the Bible, and they live out their lives based on whether celibacy, or whatever they choose to do, and they should have the right to do that."

He continued:

"We have to not weaponize the Bible to cover up, a lot of times, our homophobic views that have nothing to do with the Bible. A lot of people that maybe profess Christianity, they have views that are not even bibliocentric. It's their personal views that they do not understand, sometimes maybe the biology of homosexuality, and so they want to find a scripture to try to justify their own homophobic views... you can't abuse people from a platform, because that ain’t love, that's not the gospel, to take a microphone and weaponize it to hurt people and to condemn people."

 

Omarosa Manigualt-Newman, Clay Cane

Omarosa Manigault-Newman met her match when she tangled with Clay Cane, host of Sirius XM Urban View Radio on Thursday. Cane is an award-winning journalist and author who is best known as director and creator of the documentary Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church.

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