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Summer Walker was heavily criticized for alleging that Covid-19 mRNA vaccines are contagious and can cause spontaneous abortions.

The R&B singer sparked controversy when she warned her followers that standing next to a vaccinated person can cause miscarriages and blood clots.

The 25-year-old singer made the unusual remarks in posts on social media on Monday.

"We're all f*****d," she wrote in her Instagram stories. "Stay the f*** away from people who were vaccinated. People are reporting bleeding, bruising, spontaneous periods and miscarriages from being in close [proximity] to a recently vaccinated person." She added the hashtag #YouHaveBeenWarned.

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In a follow-up post Summer wrote in all caps:

"I'm alarmed by the amount of women in my DM's complaining about abnormal bleeding and miscarriages after coming in contact with someone whose been vaccinated!!!!!"

Instagram attached a Covid fact-checking information box to Summer's post noting that Covid-19 vaccines are tested for "safety and effectiveness".

Millions of people have reported adverse reactions to Covid-19 mRNA vaccines around the world. But there are no reports of contracting adverse effects from simply standing next to a vaccinated person.

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Lil Nas X spoke out about rumors that DMX's death was a blood sacrifice because he died on LNX's birthday.

DMX died on April 9, and coincidentally, LNX was born on April 9, 1999. That was too many 9s for some people who follow numerology.

One conspiracy theorist tweeted: "DMX was a sacrifice as he died on Lil Nas X bday. No such thing as chance."

Lil Nas X retweeted the post and wrote, "it genuinely scares me knowing how crazy you n****s are."

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LNX was already upset about tweets calling for his death before DMX passed away on his birthday.

After DMX died, Sada Baby wished death on LNX by tweeting, "Lord we said Nas X, not DMX."

After some backlash, Sada Baby clarified that he wasn't really wishing death on Lil Nas X, he was annoyed over the controversy surrounding LNX's recent Lucifer-themed music video and "Satan Shoes."

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Tiffany Haddish and social media influencers are catching heat for "bullying" a young female doctor who disputed their Covid-19 conspiracy theories.

According to multiple reports, the unidentified doctor was bullied on the app "Clubhouse" by the comedienne and social media influencers with over 1 million followers each, such as Jason Lee, Joe Budden, and Instagram activist Chaka Bars.

Clubhouse is an invitation-only audio-chat that allows users to create private rooms.

Haddish, Budden, and Chaka Bars reportedly harassed several Black doctors on January 13, and even doxxed the doctors by sharing their personal information online.

The doctors were disputing conspiracy theories being spread by Haddish and others. Among the conspiracy theories is the government invented Covid-19 and social distancing to make it easier for satellites to do facial recognition.

Hours before the doctor was admitted to a hospital for attempted suicide, her friends took to social media to call out the celebrities.

One user tweeted: "Hey @joinClubhouse – there is a room called 'CH Bullying' full of celebrities and conspiracy theorists who are plotting to dox several black doctors by sharing their social media accounts to several thousand people. Can you please step in? #CHBullying."

Another user wrote: "Chakabars, Tiffany Haddish, Jason Lee and other 'celebrities' are plotting in a clubhouse room to take down a young black woman doctor and they even said 'ruin her life'. They are sharing her details in a group chat. How is this allowed @joinClubhouse? #chbullying."

Haddish responded to the allegations on her Twitter account. The "Girls Trip" actress claimed she was exercising her freedom of speech about Covid-19. She wrote, "Now People on clubhouse saying I am bullying because I just told the truth."

Haddish defended her actions, saying, "There is a special place in Gods Kingdom for people that like to lie and make up stories on other people. Funny how some people can't handle the truth!"

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Rumors spread like wildfire last night that American media magnate Oprah Winfrey was arrested for her role in a sex trafficking ring that operated out of a South Florida mansion.

Late Tuesday night, Oprah's name began trending on Twitter.com. A conspiracy theory that sprouted on Facebook last week claimed federal agents raided Oprah's South Florida home, and that she had been arrested for sex trafficking.

The conspiracy theorists, devotees of QAnon, say an anonymous government official named 'Q' secretly unsealed documents and is sharing messages and symbols that serve as evidence of a hidden plot to overthrow President Trump, according to The Washington Post.

The QAnon devotees - all overzealous Trump supporters - believe that many elite politicians, millionaires, a few billionaires, and celebrities belong to an international cabal of pedophiles and will soon be arrested.

The rumormongers swear that Oprah had been named as one of the bigwigs in documents that were unsealed in the Jeffrey Epstein and Harvey Weinstein sex abuse cases.

But Oprah, 66, denied everything after the rumors began trending last night.

"Just got a phone call that my name is trending. And being trolled for some awful FAKE thing. It's NOT TRUE. Haven't been raided, or arrested. Just sanitizing and self distancing with the rest of the world. Stay safe everybody. [prayer emoji]
— Oprah Winfrey (@Oprah) March 18, 2020."

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In a viral Facebook post, the author claimed the coronavirus "is the biggest covert U.S. intelligence operation that the world has ever seen."

The author predicted that the disease would provide cover for the arrests of prominent individuals including Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Oprah Winfrey, and actor Tom Hanks, who was recently released from a hospital along with his wife, Rita Wilson, after they both tested positive for the virus in Australia.

The QAnon conspiracy theories gained momentum after U.S. President Donald Trump retweeted user photos of yellow police tape surrounding Oprah's Mediterranean villa in Boca Raton, Florida on Sunday.

The images claimed feds were "excavating the property and digging up tunnels" that were supposedly used as an underground railroad for sex traffickers to ferry children to the mansions of millionaires in the wealthy enclave of Boca.

Oprah owns many fabulous properties around the world, but none of them are in Florida, according to The Post.

Director Ava DuVernay rushed to Oprah's defense on Twitter.

"Trolls + bots began this disgusting rumor. Mean-spirited minds kept it going. #Oprah has worked for decades on behalf of others. Given hundreds of millions to individuals + causes in need. Shared her own abuse as a child to help folks heal. Shame on all who participated in this."

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

According to multiple conservative websites, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away quietly last week.

For the first time in her 25-year career on the Supreme Court, Ginsburg was not on the bench at the start of the new year.

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President Trump fires Jim Comey

President Donald Trump is set to meet with Russia's Minister of Foreign Affairs Sergei Lavrov in the Oval Office at 10:30 a.m. today -- just 17 hours after firing FBI Director James Comey, pictured center.

Sergei Lavrov, pictured right, last visited Washington in 2013 at the invitation of former U.S. President Barack Obama.

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2015 BET Awards - Arrivals

Rapper B.o.B, whose real name is Bobby Ray Simmons, Jr., 27, took to twitter.com to argue his case that the earth is really flat, not round as experts have already confirmed.

It's difficult to tell if B.o.B. is being serious or if he really was diagnosed with an unspecified mental condition as insiders have been whispering.

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