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Hennepin County Jail

Black Twitter reacted after a Minnesota judge sentenced former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin to 22.5 years in prison for the death of George Floyd.

Floyd, 46, died on May 25, 2020 from cardiac arrest due to neck compression after Chauvin kneeled on his neck for 9.5 minutes.

Derek Chauvin, 45, was convicted on second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in April.

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YouTube

On Friday, June 25, Judge Peter Cahill sentenced Chauvin to 12.5 years, plus an addition 10 years for abusing "his position of authority as a police officer, and did it in front of children."

Federal civil rights charges are still pending against Chauvin. Those charges carry their own penalties if he is convicted.

The city of Minneapolis settled a wrongful death lawsuit with Floyd's family for $27 million.

Not everyone was satisfied with the sentence on Friday. Many said Chauvin didn't receive enough time in prison.

Former ESPN journalist Jemele Hill, 45, tweeted:

"If you're wondering if Derek Chauvin's sentence is fair, Chauvin will be 60 years old when he's released from prison after serving 15 years of his 22 1/2-year sentence. George Floyd was murdered by Chauvin when he was 46. Floyd can never resume his life. Chauvin can."


 

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Minneapolis PD, Facebook

Former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts in the death of George Floyd in Minnesota.

The jury sent word to the judge that a verdict had been reached after 12 hours of deliberations on Tuesday afternoon.

Floyd died on May 25, 2020 when Chauvin kneeled on his back and neck for 8 minutes.

The National Guard moved into downtown Minneapolis ahead of the verdict announcement. Black Lives Matter activists threatened to burn the city down if the verdict was not guilty.

Floyd's death touched off protests, riots and mayhem in Democratic strongholds around the country.

Three former Minneapolis officers are awaiting trial in Floyd's death.

AFP via Getty Images

The judge presiding over the Derek Chauvin murder trial in Minnesota slammed congresswoman Maxine Waters' "abhorrent" behavior in open court on Monday.

Chauvin faces life in prison if found guilty of first degree murder in the death of George Floyd.

AFP via Getty Images

Waters, a Los Angeles congresswoman, traveled to Brooklyn Center, Minnesota to "incite violence" if Chauvin is acquitted of murder.

Judge Peter Cahill responded to a defense request for a mistrial over the comments made by Waters.

Chauvin's defense raised concerns with the judge over the impact the congresswoman's inflammatory words may have over the jury.

The judge had strong words for Ms. Waters before denying the defense's request for a mistrial.

The judge said Waters' words may be enough to overturn any guilty verdict on appeal.

"Congresswoman Waters may have given you something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned," Cahill said.

Cahill slammed Waters' behavior as "abhorrent" and "disrespectful".

"I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case," said Cahill, "especially in a manner that is disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch and our function."

He added that "if they want to give their opinions, they should do so in a respectful way and in a manner that is consistent with their oath to the Constitution, to respect the co-equal branch of government."

He continued: "Their failure to do so I think is abhorrent, but I don’t think it's prejudiced us with additional material that would prejudice this jury. They have been told not to watch the news. I trust they are following those instructions and that there is not in any way a prejudice to the defendant beyond the articles that were talking specifically about the facts of this case."

Waters responded to the controversy on Monday morning, telling theGrio.com that the "KKK and other white supremacists" are blowing her words out of proportion.

“Republicans will jump on any word, any line and try to make it fit their message and their cause for denouncing us and denying us, basically calling us violent ... any time they see an opportunity to seize on a word, so they do it and they send a message to all of the white supremacists, the KKK, the Oath Keepers, the [Proud] Boys and all of that, how this is a time for [Republicans] to raise money on [Democrats] backs,” Waters said.

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A Minneapolis judge has delayed the start of the trial for former police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

The murder trial, which was set to begin Monday, will start on Tuesday morning with the selection of jurors, according to MSN.com.

Judge Peter Cahill of the Hennepin County district court delayed the trial to mull over whether to reinstate the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin.

But, according to ABC News, Judge Cahill said he does not have jurisdiction to rule on whether the third-degree murder charge should be reinstated.

Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Floyd during a traffic stop in May 2020.

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A viral video that showed Chauvin pressing his knee into Floyd's neck as he took his last breath sparked weeks of rioting, looting and unrest in Minneapolis and other Democratic stronghold states.

Black Lives Matter has been protesting outside the courthouse for days.

Minneapolis and Hennepin County officials spent at least $1 million erecting fences topped with barbed wire and other barricades around the courthouse and City Hall buildings.

BLM is calling for the quick conviction of Chauvin. One speaker led BLM in chants: "The whole world is watching!"

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Minneapolis PD

A Minnesota judge dismissed a murder charge against Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who was charged in the death of George Floyd in May.

Hennepin County District Court Judge Peter Cahill's dismissed a third-degree murder against Chauvin, who now faces two counts of second-degree murder and manslaughter.

Judge Cahill also denied defense requests to dismiss the aiding and abetting counts against three other former Minneapolis officers, Thomas Lane, J. Jueng and Tou Thao.

Chauvin was released from jail on Oct. 7 after posting a $1 million non-cash bond.

Chauvin, who was arrested on May 31, was charged in the death of Floyd, an unarmed Black man who is seen pleading for his life in a viral video.

Chauvin's defense attorney argued that his client did not intend to assault or kill Floyd during an encounter on May 25.

All four former cops are awaiting trial set for March 8, 2021.

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Minneapolis PD

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on George Floyd's neck until he died, has been released from jail.

Chauvin was released from jail after posting a $1 million "non-cash bond" on Wednesday, Oct. 7.

The former cop posted a non-cash $1 million bond signed by A-Affordable Bail Bonds of Brainard, Minnesota around 10:34 a.m. Wednesday, FOX9 reports. He left the jail at 11:22 a.m. His current whereabouts are unknown.

Chauvin, who was arrested on May 31, had been held in segregation at the maximum security Oak Park Heights, Minnesota Prison where he was transferred following death threats from inmates at the county jail in Minneapolis.

Chauvin was charged in the death of Floyd, an unarmed Black man who is seen pleading for his life in a viral video. He was charged with second-degree manslaughter. Three other former officers who were at the scene were also arrested and have since been released.

All four are awaiting trial set for March 8, 2021.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd were mobbed by protesters as they left the Hennepin County courthouse on Friday.

The four attended a pre-trial hearing where their attorneys filed motions to dismiss the charges against them. Judge Peter Cahill ruled he would not rule on the defense motions to dismiss the charges.

The judge also declined to rule on motions to combine the four cases into one trial.

Former officer Derek Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter in Floyd's death on May 25.

Viral video captured Chauvin kneeling on Floyd's neck for over 8 minutes until he expired. The footage sparked violent protests in Minneapolis and around the country.

Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Three former officers J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thau and Thomas Lane (pictured above) were fired from the police force and later charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

Chauvin is the only former officer still in police custody while awaiting his murder trial.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman was disqualified from participating in the prosecution because he was present at an interview with a medical examiner, KHOU reported.

The judge also denied motions to allow two of Floyd's earlier arrests into the record to be used as evidence.

No date was given for any additional pre-trial hearings.

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Facebook.com

A special education teacher at Cedar Grove High School near Atlanta was terminated after he wrote a Facebook post urging a Black Lives Matter supporter to kill a white child.

Brian Papin made the comment after he viewed a viral photo of a BLM supporter named Isaiah Jackson kneeling on a screaming white baby's neck in a viral photo.

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Instagram.com

Papin wrote: "Again! Your [sic] doing it wrong! One knee on the center of the back one on the neck and lean into it until death! You saw the video! Get it right or stop f***ing around!"

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Facebook.com

The photo was a recreation of the infamous video of former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin kneeling on George Floyd's neck until he died.

Jackson was later arrested on a probation violation.

A DeKalb County Schools spokesperson confirmed Papin was no longer employed at the school following the public backlash.

"The teacher is no longer employed with DCSD. Again, there is no place for racism or abuse in our school district," DeKalb Schools tweeted on Friday.

Papin resigned his position at the school, according to Fox 5 Atlanta.

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Minneapolis PD, Facebook

Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who is already facing charges in the death of George Floyd, is also facing multiple felonies after he and his wife underreported their income for years.

According to CBS Minnesota, Derek and his wife Kellie - who are in the midst of divorce proceedings - were charged with nine counts of felony tax evasion.

The Chauvins reportedly worked multiple side jobs over the years - and earned over $400,000 between them. But their side hustle income was not reported according to the feds.

Kellie filed for divorce following Chauvin's arrest on murder charges in May. The action was likely taken to protect the couple's assets.

Investigators began looking into the Chauvins in June, 2020 for failing to file Minnesota individual income tax returns on time from 2016 to 2019, and for fraudulently filing tax returns from 2014 to 2019.

The investigation began after the feds overheard recorded jail phone calls between the two.

In one call, Derek was overheard telling Kellie someone was looking into their tax returns. He suggested she contact the person who handled their taxes. That person turned out to be his father.

According to the complaint, the Chauvins failed to file income tax returns or pay state income taxes. They also allegedly underreported and underpaid taxes on income from various employments each year.

The Chauvins own homes in Minnesota and Florida. They also own a 2019 BMW that was registered in Florida - where there are no state taxes - but the car was serviced 10 times in Minnesota.

The felony tax evasion charges are the result of an investigation conducted by the Minnesota Department of Revenue and the Oakdale Police Department. The couple faces a maximum sentence of 45 years in prison and/or a $90,000 fine each.

Washington County Attorney Pete Orput noted: "When you fail to fulfill the basic obligation to file and pay taxes, you are taking money from the pockets of citizens of Minnesota.

"Our office has and will continue to file these charges when presented. Whether you are a prosecutor or police officer, or you are a doctor or a realtor, no one is above the law."

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Minneapolis PD

Eight Black Minnesota corrections officers filed a racial discrimination lawsuit for allegedly being barred from guarding Derek Chauvin at the detention center where they work.

The eight non-white guards filed the lawsuit against the Ramsey County Adult Detention Center for allegedly providing only white corrections officers to guard Chauvin.

Chauvin, 44, has been held at the detention center since May 29 on charges of felony murder in the death of George Floyd in south Minneapolis on May 25.

The corrections officers said Superintendent Steve Lydon ordered all non-white officers and the Black officers were told to avoid contact with Chauvin.

In the discrimination lawsuit, Lydon allegedly said the officers' race made them a potential "liability" if anything were to happen to Chauvin after he arrived at the facility.

"I understood that the decision to segregate us had been made because we could not be trusted to carry out our work responsibilities professionally around the high-profile inmate — solely because of the color of our skin," said the acting sergeant, who is Black.

He added: "I am not aware of a similar situation where white officers were segregated from an inmate."

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CBS News, Facebook, Minneapolis PD

The man who claimed George Floyd and former police officer Derek Chauvin "bumped heads" at a nightclub now says he mixed up Floyd with someone else.

David Pinney, who claimed he worked "closely" with Floyd and Derek Chauvin -- and previously told CBS News the two men "bumped heads" -- changed his story Wednesday.

Pinney told CBS News he worked at the same nightclub in south Minneapolis with Floyd for 5 months in late 2015 and early 2016.

He described tension between the two men -- and he said he often stepped in to break up fights between them.

He initially described a close bond with Floyd. "It's a difference when you work side by side with somebody. Like, I see him like a brother...."

"I knew George on a work basis," he said. "We were pretty close. When it came to our security positions, he was in charge and I worked directly below him as a security adviser."

He said Chauvin was "extremely aggressive within the club."

"…..he always showed aggression to, you know, George. So George, to keep it professional, George had me intervene and – interface with him instead of himself, just to be – just to get away from the conflict and keep it professional."

Pinney told CBS News he and Floyd were "very close" and he viewed him as a brother.

On Wednesday, Pinney told CBS News in an email he had confused Floyd with someone else: "There has been a mix up between George and another fellow co-worker," he wrote.

"I apologize for not doing my due diligence and placing you in a very uncomfortable situation," Pinney told CBS4's Jeff Pegues.

A lawyer representing the Floyd family called for Chauvin to be charged with first-degree murder because he believes Chauvin knew who Floyd was and what happened on May 25 was personal.
 

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Facebook.com

George Floyd, the Minnesota man whose death in police custody sparked violent protests across the nation, tested positive for the COVID-19 virus, his autopsy report shows.

Floyd, 46, died from asphyxia when a 200 lb. cop kneeled on his neck and chest, making it difficult for him to breathe.

The medical examiner said Floyd had likely recovered from the virus by the time of his death. The report indicated Floyd tested positive for the infectious disease on April 3, making it likely that he recovered by the time he died.

But the virus may have damaged his lungs, causing shortness of breath on exertion which would have caused him to fatigue easily.

The 20-page report also shows Floyd had traces of fentanyl and methamphetamines in his system when he died.

The report lists Floyd's cause of death as a heart attack complicated by law enforcement restraint and neck compression, which conflicts with a secondary autopsy paid for by the family that shows Floyd died of "asphyxiation from sustained pressure."

Derek Chauvin, 44, was fired from the Minneapolis police force along with three other officers who were at the scene and did nothing to save Floyd. All four officers are charged with his murder.

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Candace Owens continued her attack on George Floyd, the Black Minnesota man who was killed in police custody on May 25.

Owens told her Twitter followers George Floyd "is being upheld as an amazing human being."

She detailed his criminal history, which includes 8 arrests between 1997 and 2005 in Harris County, Texas. Floyd, 46, allegedly held a woman against her will at gunpoint before searching her house for drugs and money.

"Everyone is pretending that this man lived a heroic lifestyle," Owens said. "We are embarrassing in that regard. Nobody wants to tell the truth in Black America. Our biggest problem is us. "I have no apologies to make. George Floyd is not my martyr. He can be yours."

Owens agreed that, despite his criminal history, Floyd's family deserved justice because he was a man being.

"Not every Black American is a criminal. Not every Black American is committing crimes. But we are unique in that we are the only people that fight and scream and demand support for the people in our community that are up to no good. You would be hard-pressed to find a Jewish person who has spent five stints in prison, who commits a crime and dies while committing a crime and that the Jewish people demand justice for."

She continued, "You would be hard-pressed to find this in white America -- even in Latino America. What I am saying is not any defense for Derek Chauvin. The family of George Floyd deserves justice for the way that he died but I also am not going to accept the narrative that this is the best the Black community has to offer. For whatever reason it has become fashionable over the last five or six years for us to turn criminals into heroes overnight. It is something I find despicable."

In a follow-up post, Owens wrote: "Confession: #GeorgeFloyd is neither a martyr or a hero. But I hope his family gets justice."

Derek Chauvin, the ex Minneapolis police officer who kneeled on Floyd's neck causing his death, was fired from the police force and arrested. Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison upgraded his charges to second-degree murder.

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In addition to Chauvin (pictured 2nd from right), three former officers who pinned Floyd to the ground and stood by while he died were also charged in Floyd's murder on Wednesday, June 3.

Former Minneapolis officers J. Alexander Kueng, (pictured 2nd from left), Thomas Lane (left), and Tou Thao (far right) are all in custody, charged with aiding and abetting and second-degree murder and aiding and abetting and second-degree manslaughter. Kueng is set to appear in court on Thursday. If convicted on all charges, they face a maximum of 40 years in prison.

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An independent autopsy found that George Floyd died from traumatic asphyxia caused by external pressure on his neck and back.

Ben Crump, the attorney for Floyd's family, announced the new findings on Monday. He said an independent autopsy performed by Dr. Michael Baden determined that Floyd, 46, died from "asphyxiation from sustained pressure" that occurred when former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, kneeled on Floyd's neck and back.

An initial autopsy conducted by the state medical examiner found that Floyd died from a combination of preexisting conditions, police restraint, and possible "intoxicants" in his body.

But the family was not satisfied by the initial findings and asked Dr. Baden to conduct an independent autopsy.

Dr. Baden performed a second autopsy on Jeffrey Epstein that determined his death was caused by homicidal violence.

Dr. Michael Baden and Dr. Allecia Wilson performed the autopsy and said there was "neck and back compression that led to a lack of blood flow to the brain," according to Crump's statement. They added that "weight on the back, handcuffs and positioning were contributory factors because they impaired the ability of Mr. Floyd’s diaphragm to function."

Baden said Floyd died at the scene.

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Facebook

The wife of Derek Chauvin, the ex-Minneapolis police officer who is charged with killing George Floyd, has filed for divorce.

Derek Cauvin, 44, was arrested Friday and charged with 3rd-degree murder and 2nd-degree manslaughter in the death of Floyd, 46.

Floyd's slow, tortuous death, which was captured in a viral video, sparked violent protests around the country.

Kellie Chauvin said in a statement through her attorney on Friday that she sends her condolences to the Floyd family. She said she is "devastated" and is divorcing her husband of 10 years.

Kellie, who has 2 children from her first marriage, said Chauvin was the man of her dreams.

She met Chauvin at the hospital in Hennepin County where she works as a radiologist, according to Pioneer Press.

He brought a suspect in for a health check before an arrest. After taking the suspect to jail, he returned and asked her out.

"Under all that uniform, he's just a softie," Kellie told Pioneer Press in 2018. "He’s such a gentleman. He still opens the door for me, still puts my coat on for me. After my divorce, I had a list of must-haves if I were ever to be in a relationship, and he fit all of them."

Kellie has no children from her marriage to Chauvin, but she asked the public and news media to respect the privacy of her children and grandparents.