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Atlanta PD, FOX 5, Rep. Masha Maison

A man accused of stalking state Representative Mesha Mainor lashed out at her in alarming jailhouse phone calls.

The FOX 5 I-Team obtained recordings of the jailhouse phone calls through the Georgia Open Records Act.

In 2019, Mainor was running for Atlanta City Council when she told a volunteer campaign volunteer he could no longer work for her.

The campaign volunteer -- Corwin Monson -- launched a campaign of harassment against Mainor that included calling her hundreds of times a day and leaving frightening voicemail messages.

"It became frightening,” she told Atlanta Progressive News. "By May, he was dropping gifts off at my house because he couldn't talk to me."

Mainor filed a restraining order against Monson in July 2019. She told a judge Monson joined her church to be close to her. He showed up to her home an average of 2-3 times a week.

The judge granted her request for a restraining order. Weeks later, Mainor filed a police report, claiming Monson "violated a restraining order" and showed up at her church, Friendship Baptist, "sitting in the church just looking at her."

Police arrested Monson and charged him with felony aggravated stalking. He was released on bond, FOX 5 News reports.

Monson was arrested again a year later on another aggravated stalking charge for contacting Mainor through her Facebook page.

Monson was locked up again in December 2020. He remains in jail, awaiting trial.

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FOX 5 News

"Praise God, he is in jail. I feel a little bit safer," said Mainor, who was sworn in as the new state representative from the 59th District in Atlanta a month later.

But Monson's phone calls continued even after he was locked up and denied bail.

"I don't want that bitch being no state representative. Keep that b**** out of the State House. Now, let's play hardball," Monson said on one jail house call.

On one of the calls, Monson said he will stay in prison for ten years if he has to get back at her. "I want that b**** shutdown," he said.

"The fact that he would say he would stay in jail for 10 years out of sheer hatred for me. That's crazy. If a judge lets him out, what do you think he's going to do to me," Mainor told The FOX I-Team.

In another conversation, Monson tells his wife, he wants Representative Mainor criminally charged with theft and perjury for allegedly stealing his lawn furniture.

Commissioner Marvin Arrington Jr. withdrew as Monson's attorney, after Mainor filed an ethics complaint and a bar complaint against him on Oct. 21, 2020.

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Law & Crime/YouTube.com

An ethics complaint has been filed against a Dallas, Texas judge who hugged former cop Amber Guyger and gave her a Bible following her guilty verdict on Wednesday.

Guyger, who is white, was found guilty of murder and sentenced to 10 years in prison for fatally shooting 26-year-old accountant Botham Jean, an unarmed Black man who was relaxing in his own apartment when Guyger barged in.

Judge Tammy Kemp fueled outrage when she embraced Guyger in court and handed her a Bible after Guyger was sentenced on Wednesday, Oct. 2.

The judge's actions prompted many to question why Black defendants aren't treated the same way.

The Freedom From Religion Foundation filed an ethics complaint against the judge with the Texas State Commission on Judicial Conduct on Thursday.

The FFRF group said Kemp went too far by embracing the former cop in court and praying with her before Guyger was shipped off to prison.

The FFRF called Judge Kemp's behavior inappropriate and unconstitutional.

After a victim impact statement by Jean's brother, Brandt Jean, he told Guyger he loved her and embraced her.

Then Kemp embraced Guyger and spoke with her before leaving the courtroom and returning with her personal Bible.

She turned the pages to John 3:16 and told Guyger, "This is where you start." She continued, saying, "He has a purpose for you," referring to God.

In the complaint, the FFRF said Judge Kemp, "Handled a difficult trial with grace" but that she "signaled to everyone watching... that she is partial to Christian reform and Christian notions of forgiveness."

Legal experts have noted that the hug and the Bible could cause a conflict if Guyger files an appeal, which her attorneys have stated she will.

Other legal experts weighed in, saying Kemp's actions bordered on judicial misconduct.

"I did not see why the judge did what she did," said C. Victor Lander, a former municipal judge who spent 27 years behind the bench.

"Once there's an appearance that the judges are not impartial, we lose our entire criminal justice system," Lander said.