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Rappers Lil Durk (red jacket) and Pooh Shiesty (black bubble jacket) filmed a music video in a packed Chicago nightclub this week. Chicago is one of the cities still on lockdown 10 months after the Corona hysteria first swept America.

In this photo from the music video, filmed inside a Chicago nightclub, no one is wearing a face mask or social distancing.

Okayplayer tackled the "skepticism... displayed within hip-hop circles" in an article titled "Hip-Hop Has An Anti-Vaccine problem."

Young people live in an era of rising death counters, mask mandates and state lockdowns that are unprecedented in modern history.

The youth are reminded daily of "overwhelmed" hospitals and "surging cases" of Covid-19. But the male-dominated hip-hop industry continues to thrive despite the Corona fear mongering.

Rappers such as Royce da 5'9", Freddie Gibbs, and Nas thumb their noses at vaccines. Their respective albums and EPs contain tracks with recurring themes of general distrust of the government and vaccine manufacturers.

Royce da 5'9"'s Grammy-nominated album The Allegory contains a track titled "Tricked," in which the 43-year-old links the flu vaccines to autism.

"From day one at the hospital they target our children/Say they gonna immunize 'em they somehow get autism."

On the song "FUBU," he raps: "My son got autism from injection by syringes."

In an interview with Complex.com, Royce didn't apologize for his anti-vaxx views, which he says are not dangerous.

"It's not a danger, because I'm speaking the facts," he said. "People who are against the anti-vaxxers, where are their facts at? What facts do they have? Was there something that America told them? Because I operate under the edict that America is guilty until proven innocent."

Last year, Freddie Gibbs, Killer Mike, and Pusha T collaborated on the track "Palmolive," which contains this rap by Gibbs: "Maxine Waters, f**k your poison, keep your vaccines off us."

Nas's anti-vaccine lyrics date back to 2001's classic Stillmatic. on the song "What Goes Around," he rapped: "doctors injectin' our infants with the poison."

Newcomer rapper NLE Choppa also uses his platform to spread his anti-vaxx views.

"Stay away from the vaccines, I repeat stay away from THEM VACCINES," the 18-year-old tweeted on Dec. 13.

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Atlanta-based rapper Offset, of the group Migos, expressed his distrust of Pfizer's vaccine, which was approved by the FDA for emergency use on Dec. 11.

Offset referenced a viral photo that shows three out of 4 vaccine recipients who allegedly contracted Bell's palsy after getting the vaccines. But the photo has since been debunked.

Rap legend Pete Rock questioned the legitimacy of giving vaccines to healthy people who aren't at risk for the virus.

"Vaccine shit is real stupid. How you giving vaccine to people who arent sick?" he tweeted.
 

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Anti-vaxxers who refuse to vaccinate their children against childhood diseases are considered insane conspiracy theorists who put the health of their children at risk.

Now a ten-year study validates their fears that there may be a link to vaccines and an increase in childhood disorders.

54 percent of children and young adults in the U.S. suffer from chronic illnesses that require lifelong pharmaceutical prescriptions.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) refused to conduct a study comparing vaccinated children with their unvaccinated peers.

So pediatricians in Oregon took it upon themselves to conduct a study after they noticed respiratory illnesses in children skyrocketing over the past 30 years.

Dr. Paul Thomas, M.D., conducted the ten year study at Integrative Pediatric that found unvaccinated children were considerably healthier than vaccinated children. The results of the study were published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

The study, which followed 3,300 vaccinated and unvaccinated pediatric patients for ten years, revealed that unvaccinated children required 25 times LESS visits to the doctor for respiratory ailments than vaccinated children.

Dr. Yehuda Shoenfeld found that vaccinated children were more likely to suffer from asthma, ear infections, allergies, sinus infections and skin rashes than unvaccinated children.

The CDC recommends over 70 doses of 16 vaccines for a child before he reaches the age of 18.

Children who received 90 to 95% of the recommended vaccines were about 25 times more likely to see the pediatrician than the unvaccinated children.

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As a possible Covid-19 vaccine April availability date looms, some Americans have expressed concerns about their employers forcing them to get the vaccine.

The New York State Bar Association on Saturday voted to approve a resolution urging the state to make Covid-19 mRNA vaccinations mandatory for all New Yorkers -- even those who object for "religious, philosophical or personal reasons."

Other local governments are considering their own vaccine mandates for a virus that causes no symptoms or mild flu-like symptoms 99.4% of the time.

According to AARP, you can you lose your job if you don't take the COVID-19 vaccination. "An employer can make a vaccination a requirement if you want to continue working there."

"Employment in the United States is generally 'at will,' which means that your employer can set working conditions," says Dorit Reiss, a law professor at the University of California.

AARP said there are exceptions, such as medical disability or religious beliefs. As mentioned before, New Yorkers can't object for "religious, philosophical or personal reasons." But a medical disability may be acceptable.

It also depends on whether your job is indispensable and not easily outsourced.

As a RN, your auntie worked at hospitals up and down the Eastern seaboard. Every hospital had a flu vaccine mandate. None of the hospitals pressed the issue when I declined to take the flu vaccine. I didn't have to give a reason. I simply signed a waiver form and it was placed in my employee file.

Update: Ticketmaster announced it will verify if fans received Covid-19 vaccinations or tested negative before issuing tickets.

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ESPN college football reporter, Edward Aschoff died from double pneumonia, weeks after coming down with the flu. He was 34.

Aschoff died Tuesday on his birthday following a "brief illness," according to ESPN. He was known for his "compassionate" reporting on college football players.

Friends and colleagues of the young reporter said he died from pneumonia after being sickened with the flu.

Aschoff wrote an Instagram post about contracting pneumonia after covering a football game in early December. "Covering #TheGame was a lot of fun. Getting pneumonia ... not so much. But, hey, I'm a hockey player," he wrote.

On Dec. 4, he wrote:

"Having pneumonia is pretty terrible. Like the absolute worst. But it helps having this sweet angel taking care of you even when she’s risking getting this soul-crushing illness herself. All the soup, tea and delicious meals have kept me from crawling into a corner and crying the days away. Love you, babe. Thanks for putting up with my 5 am coughing fits..."

Aschoff and his fiancee, Katy Berteau, planned to marry in April 2020.

On Dec. 5, Aschoff tweeted that he was suffering from pneumonia in multiple lobes of his lungs. He described himself as someone who "never gets sick and has a very good immune system."

"Anyone ever had multifocal (bilateral) pneumonia in their early 30s as [someone] who never gets sick and has a very good immune system? Asking for two friends ... my lungs."

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Aschoff's death shocked his friends and colleagues who shared their grief on social media.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta reports the widespread flu epidemic has killed nearly 2,000 people this flu season.

A new, unusual strain of the flu can make even healthy people vulnerable to common bacteria and virus that cause pneumonia.

Socialite Kim Porter, who had three children with hip-hop mogul Sean Combs, 50, died from double pneumonia on Nov. 15, 2018 after suffering with the flu for weeks. She would have turned 49 on Dec. 15.

The CDC estimates there have been at least 3.7 million flu cases this season, 32,000 requiring hospitalization. Over 1,900 people have died, including 19 children.

Doctors urge everyone 6 months and older to get flu shots ahead of the peak flu season, which is January through February in some geographical areas. High-dose flu shots are being marketed to people over 65.

You should call your doctor or healthcare professional as soon as you begin to feel symptoms of the flu and if your symptoms persist for longer than 7 days.

Symptoms include:

  • runny nose
  • cough
  • fever/chills
  • body aches
  • headaches
  • eye pain
  • sore throat
  • low appetite
  • fatigue (weakness)
  •  

    People at high risk for the flu are those with chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, asthma, heart disease, HIV, the over 65 population, or people with weak immune systems.

    Adults with a fever of 102 F or higher and children with a fever of 103 F or higher should see a doctor right away.

    A common cold and the flu are caused by different viruses. Learn the difference between a cold and the flu.

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