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In every relationship one person loves the other partner more. That fact was evident when Russell Wilson and his wife, Ciara participated in GQ magazine's pre-Valentine’s Day "Modern Love" relationship issue.

The Seattle Seahawks quarterback and his pop singer-turned homemaker wife participated in "The Couples' Quiz" in which each partner asks the other questions about themselves that their partner should know.

"What's my biggest fear?" Russell asked Ciara, who responds, "Is it L-O-S-I-N...?" But before she could spell out the word "losing," Russell said, "Yes, losing you."

READ ALSO: 11 Signs That Your Partner Loves You More Than You Love Them

Russell's female fans swooned over his undying devotion to his wife. But the men on one forum had a different perspective on Russell's answer.

Some men referred to the effeminate quarterback as a "simp" who is more in love with his wife than she is with him.

"If i was his parent i would have a stern talking with him. Ol simpy mcsimp [sic]," wrote one commenter on the male-domination forum theColi.com.

"Yeah, that brother is starving," wrote another commenter.

Another commenter gave a more detailed analysis, noting that Russell "leveled up" to Ciara.

"Russell seems like a good guy, but she has his nose wide open," writes Crude Superstar.

"You can tell he didn't have anything near her caliber before he became this all pro football player and one of the most recognizable faces in the NFL.

What's funny about that is Ciara isn't anything special. She might have a dynamite personality, but chances are he just leveled up and she also realized that she isn't getting anything better than him either so she's on her absolute best behavior.

Going from a guy like Future to Russell must be like daylight and dark."

 

 

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GQ magazine

GQ magazine has named Megan Thee Stallion Rapper of the Year. The 26-year-old "Savage" rapper was chosen from a short list of rappers who don't mumble.

Megan, who is best known for her stripper anthem "WAP" with fellow rapper Cardi B, covers GQ's 25th annual Men of the Year issue.

She said: "I want [Black women] to be sassier. I want us to demand more, be more outspoken, keep speaking and just keep demanding what you deserve."

She added: "Don't change — just get better. Grow from these situations. Don't be beating yourself up about these situations. I feel we keep this stuff in and there's some kind of way we flip it on ourselves. We didn't f--- up — we didn't do something wrong."

It isn't clear what criteria GQ used to pick the Rapper of the Year. It must be her in-your-face attitude that scored points with the judges.

She did share her personal take on the Tory Lanez shooting that made her a household name over the summer.

"Like, I never put my hands on nobody," she told GQ. "I barely even said anything to the man who shot me when I was walking away. We were literally like five minutes away from the house."

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Micaiah Carter for GQ Style

The Centers for Disease Control has changed its guidance on face masks once again. This time the CDC emphasizes that face masks protect you, rather than just the people around you.

The CDC's old guidance, which changes with the political climate, claimed face masks don't protect you, they protect those around you.

The CDC's updated guidance also advocates cloth masks over the blue surgical masks littering beaches and city landscapes.

According to the CDC: "Studies demonstrate that cloth mask materials can also reduce wearers' exposure to infectious droplets through filtration, including filtration of fine droplets and particles less than 10 microns."

The coronavirus is 1 micron or less.

The CDC suggests wearing multiple layers of cloth with higher thread counts such as silk, which the CDC claims filters "nearly 50% of fine particles less than 1 micron."

The CDC maintains that silk "may help repel moist droplets and reduce fabric wetting and thus maintain breathability and comfort."

About the cover

Maryland rapper IDK, real name Jason Mills, is pictured above on the cover of British GQ Style issue 31.

Leon Bennett/Getty Images

IDK, who was born in London, is the first artist ever to creative direct his own GQ cover, which was shot by Micaiah Carter.

IDK (Ignorantly Delivering Knowledge) explains, "The cloth represents roots. The doll represents youth. And I represent the 70 per cent [sic], which is education."
 

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PEOPLE magazine

Singer John Legend is People magazine's Sexiest Man Alive 2019. It shouldn't be a surprise that the liberal magazine chose Legend, who is a very vocal anti-Trump critic.

Actor Idris Elba, People's 2017 Sexiest Man Alive, congratulated Legend by joking with actor Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson (People's 2016 Sexiest Man Alive).

"My G Congratulations brother!!! You deserve it," Elba, 47, wrote. "DO NOT TELL @TheRock He still thinks he’s got the title, I didn't have the heart to tell him when I took it."

The regression of male masculinity is very evident in the men People magazine chose over the years.

Hollywood has waged war on toxic masculinity, so-called traditional masculinity norms that they say are harmful to women and children.

Hollywood is going to great lengths to redefine and ultimately erase masculinity in males as we know it.

Pharrell Williams, who is decidedly feminine, covered GQ magazine's 'New Masculinity' issue last month.

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GQ magazine

Williams, 46, appeared on the cover wearing a floor length yellow bubble coat that caused quite a commotion on social media.

People magazine and GQ are making it clear that a new bar has been set for manliness in America. Get used to it.
 

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GQ magazine

Effeminate musician Pharrell Williams is featured on the cover of GQ magazine's 'New Masculinity' issue.

In GQ's November issue Pharrell Williams apologizes for his masculinity and says he was "embarrassed" for perpetuating rape culture in his 2013 hit "Blurred Lines".

"Some of my old songs, I would never write or sing today. I get embarrassed by some of that stuff," the 46-year-old Aries said.

"It just took a lot of time and growth to get to that place... I think 'Blurred Lines' opened me up. I didn't get it at first. Because there were older white women who, when that song came on, they would behave in some of the most surprising ways ever. And I would be like, wow. They would have me blushing. So when there started to be an issue with it, lyrically, I was like, What are you talking about? There are women who really like the song and connect to the energy that just gets you up. And I know you want it - women sing those kinds of lyrics all the time. So it's like, What's rapey about that?"

The father of four said he realized that men use the same sort of language when taking advantage of biological women.

"...and it doesn't matter that that's not my behavior. Or the way I think about things. It just matters how it affects women. And I was like, Got it. I get it. Cool. My mind opened up to what was actually being said in the song and how it could make someone feel."

 

This is an open post where you can discuss any subject matter. This post will not be censored or moderated. Disqus may automatically moderate certain words considered offensive. There are no rules in Open Posts. So enter at your own risk.

Post Malone

22-year-old singer/songwriter Post Malone refuses to be pigeonholed as a rapper.

Malone is among a new generation of white rappers who have been selected to steer today's youth away from thug rap music.

“It should just be music, you know?” The heavily tatted Malone tells GQ magazine in an article titled "Don't Call Post Malone a Rapper".

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Colin Kaepernick

Colin Kaepernick has been named "Citizen of the Year" by GQ magazine. The men's fashion and livestyle magazine recognized Kaepernick for his social justice activism last year.

Kaepernick, 30, showed up for the cover shoot and a photo spread inside the issue, but he refused to sit for an interview.

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Cam Newton

Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton is under fire for saying America is "beyond racism".

Newton made the controversial remarks in his cover interview for the latest edition of GQ magazine.

The 27-year-old father-of-one, who is dressed as fictional superhero Superman for the cover, discussed why he believes he is the most hated man in NFL football.

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