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Twitter, Getty Images

Earlier this week, Twitter users criticized Tariq Nasheed for posting a viral video of a Holiday Inn employee being berated by a customer.

The employee, Caleb. C., is seen beating himself up after a customer berated him over a reservation error.
 

Caleb later wrote a Reddit post explaining that he suffered from bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder. He also revealed he was in a same-sex relationship.

Studies over the years have revealed a strong link between homosexuality and autism.

One recent online survey of 309 individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) reveled nearly 70% of the respondents were LGBT+.

Research suggests that individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) report increased homosexuality, bisexuality, and asexuality, but decreased heterosexuality.

Caleb didn't include autism syndrome as one of his mental disorders. However, most homosexuals with high functioning autism are never diagnosed.

Why is the link between homosexuality and autism important?

The link is important because Caleb should have been at home collecting disability payments rather than working the night shift where he is subjected to abuse.

In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association (ASA) voted to remove homosexuality from its list of mental illnesses. As a result, people like Caleb, who are autistic and suffer from other mental disorders, can't apply for disability payments.

Most people who viewed the video of Caleb's meltdown agree that he shouldn't have been working a front desk job -- even though he was working the overnight shift.

He beat himself up -- first with his fist and then with a computer monitor -- because lacked the coping skills to withstand the harassment from the customer.

A GofundMe account created for Caleb has raised $130,000. But it's clear that he can't work a public-facing job again.

If you are LGBT+ and have ever wondered "Am I autistic?", the following signs and symptoms may apply to you:

1. Socially awkward

2. Hyper sensitive to bright lights or certain noises (loud music)

3. Depression or anxiety

4. Drawn to repetitive actions or behaviors

5. Easily upset when told to stop a task in the middle

6. Can't handle even a minor change

7. Prefer to be alone

8. Common phrases confuse you ("No man is an island")

9. You don't recognize sarcasm

10. You repeat words or phrases during conversations

11. You are intensely focused on specific interests (gaming, social media, etc.)

12. Have an exceptional talent (art, music, writing, etc.)

13. Have a tough time interacting with others

14. You're lactose intolerant

15. You sometimes stare without realizing it (someone tells you you're staring)

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Getty Images

Holiday Inn's parent company has launched an investigation into a "shocking" viral video that shows a Black customer berating an autistic employee.

IHG hotels, which owns Holiday Inn, was disturbed by the video that was posted to Twitter.com on Sunday by Tariq Nasheed under the hashtag "Mayonnaise Meltdown."

"Why did you get mad and hit the compruter [sic]," the customer asked repeatedly.

The employee is seen punching himself in the face and hitting his head on a computer monitor after the customer pressed him about a reservation error.

"You've ruined my night, you've ruined my life, man," the employee said before walking away in tears.

The customer was later ejected from the hotel for harassing other employees.
 

IHG hotels called the treatment of the employee "unacceptable" and vowed to investigate the incident.

"We were shocked and saddened to see the video and the clearly unacceptable treatment of a longtime hotel colleague," Jacob Hawkins, a spokesperson for IHG Hotels & Resorts told Newsweek.

Hawkins said the Holiday Inn location where the incident took place is an independently owned franchise.

Still, he said every employee representing IHG Hotels & resorts "deserves to be treated with respect and dignity."

A Reddit user who identified himself as the employee said he quit his job and drank heavily after the video went viral.

He added that he suffers from bipolar disorder and schizo-affective disorders.

Empathetic Internet users donated over $123,000 to a GoFundMe created by a YouTube vlogger who identified the former employee as "Caleb C."

Twitter users were quick to criticize Tariq and the customer who filmed the video. A group of women attacked Tariq who referred to them as "non-FBA bed wenches."
 

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Twitter, YouTube

A Holiday Inn employee who was harassed and filmed by a rude customer over a reservation error has received overwhelming support online.

Caleb is the autistic man seen having a mental breakdown in a viral video recorded by an irate Holiday Inn customer.

The rude customer was ejected from the hotel for harassing other hotel employees.

The video went viral after Twitter activist Tariq Nasheed posted it on his Twitter page, and accused Caleb of being "racist".

A YouTube vlogger raised over $41,000 for Caleb on GoFundMe.

The vlogger who created the GoFundMe account criticized Tariq and referred to him as a repressed homosexual because of his rude responses to Black women on the app Clubhouse.

The women dragged Tariq and told him he was "cancelled" for his insensitive treatment of a man who was clearly in distress.

After quitting his job, Caleb took to Reddit.com to explain what happened.

"While I've now quit this position (my management supported me, and told me I'm welcome back. The guest was ejected from the hotel for escalating issues with staff and the owners.)

I do have mental disorders. I suffer from BPD and schizo-affective disorders. What this fine, 5’5” bald gentleman behind the camera DIDN’T record was the fact that he called me a F**GOT for an associates mistake.

He was aggressive, and fishing for a reaction. He sure got it; and I’m glad this was a wake up call for me to stop slaving away for corporations who do not care about you at all, or the guests."

Watch below as women attack Tariq on Clubhouse app.
 

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Twitter, YouTube

Twitter activist Tariq Nasheed (pictured right) shared a video of a Holiday Inn worker having a meltdown after a Black hotel guest harassed him about a reservation error.

Tariq described the Holiday Inn employee as "racist" because he began punching himself and hit his head on a computer monitor.

The employee removed himself from an obviously stressful situation by walking away. "You destroyed my life!" he told the customer before leaving.

The angry guest appeared to calm down and seemed to understand that the employee was emotionally overwhelmed. But he posted the video online anyway and it went viral, garnering millions of views.

There was nothing racist about the exchange. In fact, the customer seems to be harassing the employee over a simple mistake.

A Reddit user who claimed to be the employee explained that he had too much to drink after going viral because his meltdown, caused by his schizo-affective disorder, was "documented by a rude customer at an establishment which I was employed."

The employee said he was driving drunk and he wondered "Why is this happening to me? Why can't people have basic human kindness and compassion for someone obviously not sound?"

Many of Tariq's followers assumed the employee was drunk at work when the incident occurred. However, the employee said he was drunk after the video went viral.

One of Tariq's followers threatened to come and see him when he travels to the United States.

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Corporations such as Holiday Inn who hire people with mental illness should be commended. But such employees should be protected from rude customers.

Someone in management should have heard the commotion and approached the customer to offer their assistance. Another option is to avoid placing mentally ill people in vulnerable positions such as a front desk.

Question: Do you think companies ban recording videos of employees on the job site? Is recording video on private property a violation of employee rights?

Autism

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 1 in 68 children in the U.S. is autistic. 1 in 42 boys and 1 in 189 girls.

In 2007, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that doctors begin screening babies for autism as early as 18 months. But doctors agree that there are very few behaviors or telltale autistic or Asperger's signs that babies exhibit at 18 months.

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