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Rapper Busta Rhymes trended on social media after he railed against "weird ass" government Covid-19 mandates during a recent concert gig.

Busta, born Trevor Smith Jr., expressed his opinion during the Seoul Tacos 10th Anniversary Block Party in St. Louis, Missouri in June.

He noted that "you can't even breathe freely," while wearing a face mask. The rapper also said government officials who try to "take our civil liberties away" can "suck a d**k."

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Busta and other rappers hit the road after the CDC announced people who are fully vaccinated can go maskless indoors and outdoors.

"This is my second show in front of human life in the last fifteen f**kin' months. COVID can suck a d**k. All these little weird-ass government policies and mandates can suck a d**k. Stop tryin' to take our civil liberties away. It feels good to be back outside, we outside for real."

"It's called the God-given right of freedom, right?" he continued. "No human being supposed to tell you you can't even breathe freely. F**k your mask. I mean I’m sayin', some of y'all might feel differently but, f**k your mask. I can't rhyme to you with a mask on. We can't eat food with a f**king mask on. We can't even see each other smile with a mask on. I come from a time when before i even used to want to holler at a chick, I used to have to do s**t with my face to let her know that I’m into her."

He added:

"All of that energy gets blocked when your mask is on. Energy is important, and we are all conductors of f**kin’ good energy. We also got to be clear when a motherf**ker trying to give you bad energy, you can tell only from the expression on their face. I wanna see the face, f**k your mask. I mean, I'm sorry I gotta go political and s**t, I miss my people, we gotta talk."

Watch the video below.
 

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Publix will no longer require fully vaccinated shoppers to wear masks at their supermarkets, company officials said on Friday. Employees are also free to work without masks. The new policy went into effect on Saturday.

Trader Joe's was the first major grocery chain to drop mask mandates for employees and customers after the CDC issued new guidance.

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CVS, Walmart and Costco also changed their policy regarding masks. Customers who are fully vaccinated can roam about the stores without masks.

The no mask policy by major retailers does not require proof of vaccination.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new guidance on Thursday, ending mask mandates indoors for individuals who are fully vaccinated.

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Publix's Twitter account responded to questions regarding non-vaccinated shoppers going maskless inside stores. A Publix rep said shoppers will be on the honor system.

"Individuals who are not fully vaccinated will be reminded of face covering requirements through store entrance signage. We expect everyone in our stores to do their part to help limit the spread of COVID-19."

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Protestors in Idaho, including elected officials and minor children, burned face masks at a rally outside the state capitol building in Boise on Saturday, March 6.

Idaho's Stay Healthy Order recommends wearing "a face covering over their nose and mouth in indoor public settings or in an outdoor public space where they are unable to maintain six-feet physical distancing."

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Photos and videos show residents tossing used face masks into roaring flames inside a barrel. Demonstrators gathered to burn masks in at least 20 cities across the state to protest COVID-19 restrictions.

Elected officials joined the demonstrators who cheered as protesters tossed their masks into the fire.

Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin and Republican lawmaker Heather Scott supported the demonstrators.

"Even if you don't have a mask — because in my district a lot of people don't wear masks — it's still symbolic," Scott said in a YouTube video. "It gets the word out to the governor that it's time for this emergency order to end."

In unrelated news, the CDC said people who are "fully vaccinated" can gather in "small groups" as long as they socially distance and practice good hand washing technique.

Some businesses say they will demand to see proof of vaccinations before a fully vaccinated person enters their establishment.

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Texas is following the standards set by wide open Florida and Georgia by reopening businesses and lifting mask mandates.

On Tuesday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced he is canceling the mask mandate and reopening all businesses in the state.

Abbott said all businesses will fully reopen starting March 10.

This is welcome news for business owners who suffered catastrophic losses during the coronavirus outbreak last year.

"Removing statewide mandates does not end personal responsibility," Abbott said. "It's just that now state mandates are no longer needed."

Texas is the largest state to lift mask mandates. Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp canceled mask mandates early last year -- despite pushback from Democratic lawmakers in the state.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis also canceled mask mandates and opened his state for business last year.

Florida and Georgia have lower death and infection rates when compared to lockdown states such as California and New York.

The CDC warned states should reopen slowly due to virus "variants" and "mutations" in the wild.

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A tiny notice in a small-town newspaper about a meeting to enact a local mask mandate resulted in more than 100 angry citizens packed into the town hall Tuesday night.

On Monday, Waynesville, NC Mayor Gary Caldwell told The Mountaineer newspaper he supported a mask mandate and he would "more than likely" sign it into law after the City Council meeting on Tuesday.

"To keep the citizens here in Waynesville safe, this will be a good step," Caldwell told the paper on Monday. "It's gotten to the point where we gotta do this to try to get those numbers to come down."

But the mayor and five board members did not expect the angry backlash from more than 100 people piled into town hall screaming their heads off about their rights being violated.

When told they had to wear a mask to participate in the meeting, they refused, and chanted "take it outside" since the tiny town hall wasn't large enough.

Residents were tired of city government mandates telling them what to do. Many demanded the right to make their own medical decisions.

More police were called in to control the crowd. Those wishing to speak were asked to fill out a form and wait until their names were called.

According to The Mountaineer, the five City Council members entered through a back door and were ushered into a back room to wait until police reinforcements arrived.

Attempts to disperse the angry crowd were futile. The residents were told only 20 people could enter the board room at a time. The others would have to wait outside.

Eventually the doors to the board room were closed to drown out the loud cheers and clapping by those in the hall.

Attorney Bill Cannon finally called the meeting after 32 minutes, saying the allotted time for the hearing was up. The hearing was expected to last 90 minutes.

Many outside still waiting to speak were furious. Waynesville resident Janet Presson told The Mountaineer that board members were "unprepared" for the backlash to a mask mandate.

"I think they were dumbfounded and horrified," Presson said. "Mask mandates are a major issue that affect every single person. It is a hot-button issue. They should have done some better planning."
 

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