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The director of the original Space Jam movie, starring Michael Jordan, says Space Jam 2, starring LeBron James, is "boring."

Joe Pytka told TMZ that "Space Jam: A New legacy" was so boring, he couldn't sit through the entire movie.

Pytka pointed out that when the original Space Jam was made in 1996, Michael Jordan was the biggest star in the world. He added that LeBron can't carry Jordan's water bottle.

"The truth is that LeBron ain't Michael," Pytka said.

Space Jam: A New Legacy topped last weekend's box office with a respectable $31.1 million in ticket sales.

Black Widow landed at the No. 2 spot with $25.8 million.

LeBron dunked on his "haters" after the box office receipts were announced on Monday.

"Hi Haters," he tweeted.

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YouTube, MLS

Michael Jordan still can't find a buyer for his Highland Park, Illinois mega mansion after 9 years on the market.

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MLS

The NBA legend listed his 32,683 square foot house on the market in 2012 for $29 million. Despite slashing the price down to $14.8 million, he has yet to receive any offers on the magnificent custom property.

The mansion was being sold fully-furnished, but that furniture is out of date now. He also threw in the customized gate with the Chicago Bulls star's former number, 23.

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MLS

Jordan purchased the land with his then-wife, Juanita Vanoy, in 1991 for $2 million. The contemporary 2-story house, which was built in 1995 and sits on seven acres of green space, boasts nine bedrooms, 15 full bathrooms, an IMAX movie theater, a casino style man cave, a three-bedroom guesthouse, an outdoor tennis court, an Olympic size pool, three climate-controlled multi-car garages, and of course, a full-size NBA regulation basketball court with his signature Jumpman logo at center court.

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MLS

Jordan, 58, lives with his current wife, Yvette Prieto, and their twin daughters, in a $12.4 million estate in Jupiter Island, Florida, that he bought in 2010, according to Fox Business.

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Getty Images, WENN.com

Michael Jordan may be an icon and a legend in the eyes of many, but multiple sources say he's not the nicest guy on earth.

Rapper Chamillionaire shared an encounter he had with the billionaire at an auction of Jordan's basketball memorabilia years ago.

Chamillionaire grew up in Washington, DC, and like most boys his age in the 1980s and '90s, he idolized the Chicago Bulls legend.

According to Sportscasting.com, when he saw Jordan taking photos with others at an auction event, he approached the superstar and asked for a picture.

The 41-year-old rapper had just dropped $7,000 on a Jordan jersey for charity, but Jordan cursed Chamillionaire out and told him he wouldn't pose for a photo unless he ponied up more cash.

According to the rapper, Jordan told him, "You pay $15,000 right now for a jersey from me and I'll take a picture with you."

Disheartened by the encounter, Chamillionaire walked away without paying the $15,000.

PNP/WENN

Chamillionaire has done well for himself since his days as a hand-to-mouth rap artist with hit songs "Ridin'" and "Turn It Up."

According to Celebrity Net Worth, Chamillionaire has an estimated net worth of $50 million. He founded his own record label in 2004, and his investments include a self-driving automation tech company which was sold to General Motors in 2016.

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Former Chicago Bulls player Horace Grant says the recent ESPN documentary about Bulls legend Michael Jordan was "90 percent bullsh*t."

Grant says criticism of Jordan was "edited out" of the final cut the "so-called documentary" titled Michael Jordan: The Last Dance.

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Grant (pictured center) won three NBA championships with Jordan (holding trophy) before joining the Orlando Magic. He said the documentary painted Jordan in a better light than reality.

"I would say [the documentary was] BS in terms of the realness of it," Grant told ESPN 1000's Kap podcast.

"It wasn't real -- because a lot of things [Jordan] said to some of his teammates, that his teammates went back at him. But all of that was kind of edited out of the documentary, if you want to call it a documentary."

The NBA allowed Jordan to "retire" gracefully following the 1992–93 season after it was reported that Jordan had a gambling problem and bet on his own team.
 

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Photos by Elsa/Getty Images, Vaughn Ridley/Getty Images

Michael Jordan weighed in on the controversy surrounding the Los Angeles Clippers decision to rest star Kawhi Leonard for certain games in a NBA trend called "load management".

The NBA season is still young, and Leonard has missed 6 or 7 games to decrease risk of injuries. But Clippers fans feel cheated and are yelling foul.

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Well-respected sports announcer and NBA analyst Doris Burke criticized Leonard for sitting out a recent game against the Milwaukee Bucks and the league MVP Giannis Antetokounmpo at the Staples Center.

"It is mind-boggling to me that Kawhi doesn't want to play against the reigning MVP and he'd rather play against Portland tomorrow night on TNT," Burke said. "Kawhi not playing is ridiculous at this point."

Leonard seems unfazed by the criticism. But when Michael Jordan speaks, everyone listens.

The NBA legend and owner of the Charlotte Hornets is making sure his own players don't get the wrong idea about the work ethic that is expected of them.

According to Steve Clifford, current Orlando Magic coach and former head coach of the Hornets, Jordan addressed the issue of load management in team meetings.

"Being with Michael in Charlotte, Michael used to tell them every year, you're paid to play 82 games."

Clifford added that lazy players stood out from the rest: "I've been doing this for 20 years, and playing 82 games used to be a badge of courage for a lot of guys. There were always a lot of guys who didn't want to play. They stood out more."

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NBA legend Michael Jordan opened a medical clinic to serve the disadvantaged in his native North Carolina.

According to the Charlotte Observer, the 6-time NBA champion teared up on Thursday as he unveiled the Novant Health Michael Jordan Family Medical Clinic which has already treated 300 patients.

During his speech the Charlotte Hornets owner fought back tears as he dedicated the clinic to the community that supported him.

"I've gone off and made my life in Illinois and other places, but I know where it all begins. And I don't need my mother to constantly remind me about that," Jordan said as the crowd laughed.

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"I can only give in gratitude for what I can never repay. I stand here before you as a proud parent, son, obviously a member of this community. My mother, my brothers, my daughter, my grandson, we all represent the name 'Michael Jordan,'" the NBA Hall-of-Famer said. "As you can see, it's a very emotional thing for me. To be able to give back to a community that's supported me over the years."

The clinic was funded by a $7 million philanthropic donation from Jordan.

Jordan's goal is to bring more medical clinics to disadvantaged neighborhoods in North Carolina.

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Jordan, 56, and his second wife, Yvette Prieto share twin daughters, Victoria and Ysabel.

He also has three grown children, sons Jeffrey and Marcus, and a daughter, Jasmine, by his first wife, Juanita Vanoy.

Robert Kraft

New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft was arrested during a multi-city sex trafficking sting in Florida. The 77-year-old prominent businessman was among 25 people arrested after a months long investigation into possible human trafficking in Orlando, Jupiter, and Palm Beach, Florida.

But Kraft isn't the biggest name swept up in the sex trafficking bust.

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