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Moderna CEO warns Americans may need a 5th mRNA booster shot in the fall since previous boosters lose effectiveness.

Stephane Bancel, the CEO of Moderna, spoke on Thursday at a Goldman Sachs conference of healthcare professionals, DailyMail.com reported.

Bancel said a 5th mRNA booster is necessary in the fall because 3rd and 4th booster shots administered this fall was "not going to hold great".

"I still believe we're going to need boosters in the fall of '22 and forward," Bancel said.

He said a vaccine in development to combat the mild Omicron variant will not be ready in the next few months.

Bancel added the elderly and those with underlying health conditions might need annual booster shots for the rest of their lives.

"We have been saying that we believe first this virus is not going away," Bancel said.

"We're going to have to live with it."

In related news, the CDC changed the definition of "fully vaccinated" to "up to date".

"We are now recommending that individuals stay up to date with additional doses that they are eligible for," said CDC Director Rochelle Walensky on Wednesday.

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The Food & Drug Administration has approved mRNA vaccine booster shots for all adults over 18.

Pfizer and Moderna announced the FDA's decision on Friday. Pfizer has applied for emergency approval of its Covid Ivermectin pill.

A Centers for Disease Control panel will meet later today to announce the new definition for "fully vaccinated."

Americans who received only 2 mRNA vaccine doses or a single dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine are officially unvaccinated.

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The FDA and CDC previously approved mRNA vaccines for children ages 5-11.

At least 10 states already had started offering boosters to all adults, Yahoo! News reports.

The CDC claims all three vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna and J&J) offer protection against illness and death.

The news comes as Covid-19 "cases" have increased in the Northeast and Midwest U.S. over the last two weeks.

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Dr. Ben Carson criticized the CDC's approval of the Pfizer Covid-19 mRNA vaccine for children.

The retired brain surgeon called mRNA vaccines for children "a giant experiment" during an appearance on Fox News on Sunday.

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When asked by anchor Maria Bartiromo whether he agreed with the CDC's recommendation of vaccines for children, Carson replied, "absolutely not."

Carson, who knows a thing or two about pediatric medicine, told Bartiromo:

"The fact of the matter is, the mortality rate for children from COVID-19 is 0.025, which is very similar to the rate for seasonal flu. And we haven't been for years and years going through all these things for seasonal flu.

"Plus, we don't know what the long-term impact of these vaccines is. So this is really sort of a giant experiment. Do we want to put our children at risk, when we know that the risk of the disease to them is relatively small, but we don't know what the future risks are? Why would we do a thing like that? It makes no sense whatsoever."

In related news, the FDA has delayed its approval of Moderna's mRNA injections for children between the ages of 12 to 17.
 

The FDA is delaying its approval of the Moderna vaccine for adolescents and teens until 2022 to further examine reports of heart inflammation in males.

Reports of myocarditis - inflammation of the heart muscle - are increasing around the world.
 
READ ALSO: FDA ADDS HEART INFLAMMATION WARNING TO COVID VACCINES
 
The news comes days after an FDA panel recommended emergency use of Pfizer's mRNA vaccine in children ages 5 to 11.

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In June there were reports that Covid-19 mRNA vaccines made people magnetic. The reports were fueled by "Covid-19 vaccine magnet challenge" viral videos.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) dismissed the magnetism concerns. And one of the people making the claims - Ohio physician Sherri Tenpenny - was discredited as a member of the "Disinformation Dozen," the 12 people responsible for 65% of anti-vaccine misinformation on the Internet.

On Thursday, the Japanese Ministry of Health announced that vials of Moderna mRNA vaccine contained metallic contaminants that "reacts to magnets."

"It's a substance that reacts to magnets," the official told Nikkei, adding "It could be metal."

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Around 1.6 million doses of Moderna's Covid-19 vaccine have been discarded due to contamination in some vials, according to a Japanese ministry official.

Moderna confirmed receiving "several complaints of particulate matter" in vials distributed in Japan, but no "safety or efficacy issues" were found related to the reports.

A Moderna spokesperson told Nikkei:

"The company is investigating the reports and remains committed to working transparently and expeditiously with its partner, Takeda, and regulators to address any potential concerns."

The official added that a "manufacturing issue" at a plant in Spain was to blame, and the vaccine lot in question as well as two adjacent lots have been taken out of circulation.
 

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Americans who received 2 doses of Covid-19 messenger RNA vaccines are no longer "fully vaccinated," according to new guidance from the CDC.

The CDC announced Wednesday, Aug. 18, that a third dose of the experimental mRNA vaccine will be available for immunosuppressed individuals starting the week of September 20.

The third dose, called "booster" shots, are necessary, according to the CDC, because data submitted by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna shows the vaccine's effectiveness wears off after 6-8 months.
 
READ ALSO: FDA Authorizing THIRD Coronavirus mRNA Injection for Immunocompromised People
 
A reporter asked at a video press conference on Wednesday, "What will it mean to be fully vaccinated once people are eligible for boosters? Will it be two shots or three shots?"

Surgeon General Vivek Murthy responded:

"Our recommendation, down the line, again pending the advice and the review of the FDA..., is that we believe that that third dose will ultimately be needed to provide the fullest and continual extent of protection that we think people will need for the virus."

Prior to Wednesday, the definition of "fully vaccinated" meant two doses of mRNA vaccine or one shot of the J&J "dead virus" vaccine.

The booster shots will be available for immunocompromised individuals first in mid-September. Then it will become available to health care workers, nursing home residents and the elderly who got the first 2 doses.

The general population who received the first 2 doses will be eligible to receive the third booster shot in late September or early October, pending full approval by the FDA.

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The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized a third coronavirus mRNA injection for "immunocompromised" people beginning on Thursday, Aug. 12.

The federal health agency expanded emergency use for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna mRNA to administer third "booster" shots to people with compromised or weak immunity.

The shots are authorized for people who received the first two injections and are considered immunocompromised due to cancer treatment, autoimmune disorders, HIV or other conditions that weaken the immune system.

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Americans with weak or compromised immunity are allowed to get a third coronavirus vaccine beginning on Thursday, Aug. 12.
 
ALSO READ: Should You Get a Third Vaccine Shot? The CDC Says Not Yet
 
Previously, health experts at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta and the World Health Organization (WHO) said third boosters shots were not necessary.

However, Pfizer and Moderna claim third shots are needed because the first 2 injections are "wearing off" and antibody levels are decreasing among the fully vaccinated population.

Neither Pfizer nor Modern vaccines prevent the spread of the virus or prevent the fully vaccinated from contracting the virus.

Pfizer and Moderna have applied to the FDA for full approval of their vaccines.

About 50% of the U.S. population have been fully vaccinated.