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The brother of Olympic gymnast Simone Biles was nearly attacked in an Ohio courtroom after a judge acquitted him of triple murder on Wednesday.

Tevin Biles-Thomas was accused of a New Year's Eve 2018 shooting at a Airbnb house that killed three people, Johnson, 19, Toshaun Banks, 21, and Devaughn Gibson, 23.

The courtroom erupted after Judge Joan Synenberg issued her ruling at the Huntington Convention Center in Cleveland.

A woman rushed toward Biles-Thomas and yelled, "I'm going to kill you."

"You have to be f----ng kidding me... "He killed my baby! You know he killed my baby!"

Three sheriff’s deputies tackled the woman before she could reach the defendant.

"We get it, she's angry. She was led to believe Mr. Biles was guilty, when he wasn't, and she reacted like a mother. We don't fault her for that," Joseph Patituce, the defense attorney representing Biles-Thomas, told Fox 8 Cleveland.
 

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Former Minneapolis cop Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts in the death of George Floyd in Minnesota.

The jury sent word to the judge that a verdict had been reached after 12 hours of deliberations on Tuesday afternoon.

Floyd died on May 25, 2020 when Chauvin kneeled on his back and neck for 8 minutes.

The National Guard moved into downtown Minneapolis ahead of the verdict announcement. Black Lives Matter activists threatened to burn the city down if the verdict was not guilty.

Floyd's death touched off protests, riots and mayhem in Democratic strongholds around the country.

Three former Minneapolis officers are awaiting trial in Floyd's death.

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The judge presiding over the Derek Chauvin murder trial in Minnesota slammed congresswoman Maxine Waters' "abhorrent" behavior in open court on Monday.

Chauvin faces life in prison if found guilty of first degree murder in the death of George Floyd.

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Waters, a Los Angeles congresswoman, traveled to Brooklyn Center, Minnesota to "incite violence" if Chauvin is acquitted of murder.

Judge Peter Cahill responded to a defense request for a mistrial over the comments made by Waters.

Chauvin's defense raised concerns with the judge over the impact the congresswoman's inflammatory words may have over the jury.

The judge had strong words for Ms. Waters before denying the defense's request for a mistrial.

The judge said Waters' words may be enough to overturn any guilty verdict on appeal.

"Congresswoman Waters may have given you something on appeal that may result in this whole trial being overturned," Cahill said.

Cahill slammed Waters' behavior as "abhorrent" and "disrespectful".

"I wish elected officials would stop talking about this case," said Cahill, "especially in a manner that is disrespectful to the rule of law and to the judicial branch and our function."

He added that "if they want to give their opinions, they should do so in a respectful way and in a manner that is consistent with their oath to the Constitution, to respect the co-equal branch of government."

He continued: "Their failure to do so I think is abhorrent, but I don’t think it's prejudiced us with additional material that would prejudice this jury. They have been told not to watch the news. I trust they are following those instructions and that there is not in any way a prejudice to the defendant beyond the articles that were talking specifically about the facts of this case."

Waters responded to the controversy on Monday morning, telling theGrio.com that the "KKK and other white supremacists" are blowing her words out of proportion.

“Republicans will jump on any word, any line and try to make it fit their message and their cause for denouncing us and denying us, basically calling us violent ... any time they see an opportunity to seize on a word, so they do it and they send a message to all of the white supremacists, the KKK, the Oath Keepers, the [Proud] Boys and all of that, how this is a time for [Republicans] to raise money on [Democrats] backs,” Waters said.

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A Minneapolis judge has delayed the start of the trial for former police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd.

The murder trial, which was set to begin Monday, will start on Tuesday morning with the selection of jurors, according to MSN.com.

Judge Peter Cahill of the Hennepin County district court delayed the trial to mull over whether to reinstate the third-degree murder charge against Chauvin.

But, according to ABC News, Judge Cahill said he does not have jurisdiction to rule on whether the third-degree murder charge should be reinstated.

Chauvin is charged with second-degree murder and manslaughter in the death of Floyd during a traffic stop in May 2020.

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A viral video that showed Chauvin pressing his knee into Floyd's neck as he took his last breath sparked weeks of rioting, looting and unrest in Minneapolis and other Democratic stronghold states.

Black Lives Matter has been protesting outside the courthouse for days.

Minneapolis and Hennepin County officials spent at least $1 million erecting fences topped with barbed wire and other barricades around the courthouse and City Hall buildings.

BLM is calling for the quick conviction of Chauvin. One speaker led BLM in chants: "The whole world is watching!"

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The lawyers for slain black jogger Ahmaud Arbery have saluted JAY-Z for helping them seek justice. In an Instagram post, they revealed he chartered a private jet for them so they could attend a probable cause hearing for the defendants in Brunswick, Georgia.

S. Lee Merritt took to Instagram on Thursday to confirm the 50-year-old rap mogul and entrepreneur covered the costs of transporting himself and a colleague to court in Georgia.

"When you absolutely have to be in Court to stand with your client and righteous protestors for justice... Jay Z sends his private jet," he wrote under an Instagram snap of himself outside the plane.

"Court hearing in Brunswick, Georgia this morning. No flights to take us there last night. @leemerrittesq and I spent hours trying to find flights or cars. At 1am we started losing hope till we got a call from Jay Z’s people at Roc Nation who chartered a flight for us to attend this hearing with the family of Ahmaud Arbery," civil rights attorney Blerim Elmazi added.

Merritt also tweeted a photo of himself wearing a black face covering with the words "George Floyd" sewn on it.

He captioned the photo: "An early motion made by the defendants to the court was that I remove my mask. The court declined to consider the motion."

Arbery, 25, was shot and killed on February 23 in Glynn County, Georgia after being pursued and confronted by three white locals in pick-up trucks.

Three men were arrested in connection with the murder after video of the shooting surfaced online.

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A Philadelphia man was convicted of fatally stabbing Nicki Minaj's manager outside a Philadelphia bar in 2015.

After two trials, Khaliyfa Neely was convicted Friday of stabbing Devon Andre Pickett to death on Feb. 18, 2015 outside a bar in Germantown.

Neely, 38, was found guilty of third-degree murder, aggravated assault, simple assault and possession of an instrument of crime.

The first trial ended in a hung jury, but District Attorney Larry Krasner's office continued to pursue justice in the case. Krasner said his office had "solid evidence" to convict Neely.

"It is our duty to persist in the pursuit of justice, even in the face of challenges," said Krasner.

Neely's sentencing hearing is set for April 24. He faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted of murder.

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Cyntoia Brown Long, who was convicted of murder at age 16, is extending her support to a Wisconsin teenager who faces the death penalty for killing her pimp.

Chrystul Kizer was only 16 when she met her pimp, Randy Volar III. She is accused of shooting Volar twice in the head, then setting fire to his home.

Kizer, now 19, admitted killing Volar in his home in 2018 after she says he raped her multiple times. On the day he died, police planned to arrest Volar for child sex trafficking.

Long took to her Instagram account early Friday to voice her support for Kizer. She posted a photo of herself wearing a hoodie with the words "Justice 4 Chrystul Kizer" on the front.

Long, now 31, was granted clemency earlier this year and paroled after serving 15 years of a life sentence for killing a customer when she was a streetwise teenage prostitute.

Police say Volar's estate is worth $800,000. He made large bank deposits and other activities typical of sex traffickers.

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The teenager told police that Volar sold her to other men, which is why her attorney believes she should be shielded under sex trafficking laws.

But prosecutors say the sex trafficking laws don't apply to Kizer because she was engaged in prostitution and her life was not in imminent danger when she shot Volar in the head twice and set fire to his home.

Kizer, who has a criminal record of petty offenses, suffers from depression and other mental disorders.

If convicted of murder, she faces the death penalty or mandatory life in prison.
 

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Chrystul Kizer was only 16 when she met her pimp, Randy Volar III. Volar, 34, pimped Kizer out to older men and deposited the cash she made into his own bank account.

Kizer, now 19, admitted to killing Volar in his home in 2018 after she says he raped her multiple times. The day Volar died, he was about to be arrested for child sex trafficking.

Police say Volar's estate is worth $800,000. He made large bank deposits and other activities typical of sex traffickers.

The teenager told police that Volar sold her to other men, which is why her attorney believes she should be shielded under sex trafficking laws.

But prosecutors say the sex trafficking laws don't apply to Kizer because she was engaged in prostitution and her life was not in imminent danger when she shot Volar in the head twice and set fire to his home.

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Kizer is now on trial for her life.

If this story sounds familiar, it is because it nearly mirrors the story of Cyntoia Brown Long.

Long was also a 16-year-old prostitute when she was convicted of shooting a customer in the head while he slept. She stole the man's wallet and his car, then returned to his home with friends to steal from the deceased.

Long, now 31, was granted clemency earlier this year and paroled after being sentenced to life.

Unlike Kizer, Long didn't have a pimp. But she did have a camera-ready smile and celebrities like Kim Kardashian-West and T.I. were smitten.

Kizer, who has a criminal record of petty offenses, suffers from depression and other mental disorders.

If convicted of murder, she faces the death penalty or mandatory life in prison.
 

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Photo: Florida Bureau of Prisons

A Florida jury sentenced Henry Segura to life in prison, following his conviction of first-degree murder for the deaths of his ex-girlfriend and her three children.

The same jury that convicted Segura of four counts of first-degree murder on Tuesday deliberated for over 4 hours before sentencing Segura to two consecutive life sentences in prison.

Segura declined to offer any arguments to spare his life during the death penalty phase this morning.

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Segura, 41, was convicted of the murders of his ex-girlfriend Brandi Peters, 26, her six-year-old twin daughters, Tamiyah and Taniyah Peters, and his own son, 3-year-old JaVante Segura.

Court TV anchor Vinnie Politan was stunned by the jury's decision. "He took the lives of this entire family - all four people - and yet he's not the worst of the worst?," said Politan.

"It's not like they're still trying to figure out who did this. No! This is the man who did it - took the life of his 3 year old. Drowned another six year old; shot another six year old in the head! And then the brutal beating and murder of Brandi Peters. But, still, [he's] not the worst of the worst?" said Politan after the sentencing.

The prosecution says Segura killed Peters because he didn't want to pay her $23,000 in back child support for their son.

All four bodies were found in Peters' Tallahassee, Florida home on Nov. 20, 2010.

Peters was found in a pool of blood near the front door. Her children were stacked in a bathtub partially filled with bloody water.

One of the twins was shot in the back of the head. The other two children were drowned.

Segura was arrested 10 months later in Le Sueru County, Minnesota, where he fled after the murders.

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A Florida jury convicted Henry Segura of murdering his ex-girlfriend and her three children in 2010. A 6-person jury convicted Segura after deliberating for nearly 4 hours on Tuesday.

Segura faces the death penalty. He has been behind bars for nearly a decade since the murders.

Segura was accused of murdering his ex-girlfriend Brandi Peters, 26, her six-year-old twin daughters, Tamiyah and Taniyah Peters, and his own son, 3-year-old JaVante Segura.

The prosecution says Segura killed Peters because he didn't want to pay her $23,000 in back child support for their son.

All four bodies were found in Peters' Tallahassee, Florida home on Nov. 20, 2010.

Peters was found in a pool of blood near the front door. Her children were stacked in a bathtub partially filled with bloody water.

One of the twins was shot in the back of the head. The other two children were drowned.

Segura was arrested 10 months later in Le Sueru County, Minnesota, where he fled after the murders.

Segura's first trial in 2015 ended with a hung jury. The jurors voted 8-4 for acquittal back then.

The defense chose a 6-person jury for the retrial. They hoped they would have better luck with just 6 jurors.

The evidence against Segura was circumstantial, but he had a motive to kill her. He also lied repeatedly about his whereabouts at the time of the murders.

Segura initially lied and said he was not at Peters' home the day she was killed. But investigators discovered his secret phone, and the phone's GPS put him at the crime scene.

Segura then changed his story and admitted he was in Peters’ home that day, but he claims he was there to have sex with her, not kill her.

Complicating the murder case was a mentally ill federal inmate, James Carlos Santos, who claims he is a "drug kingpin" who ordered a hit on Peters after she stole drugs and $90,000 from the cartel. The jury didn’t buy his “confession".

Santos claims Peters was a drug mule for his drug cartel that he operated from inside the prison walls.

The prosecution noted that Peters lived with her children in Section 8 housing and could barely afford the rent.

A prison psychologist diagnosed Santos with a plethora of mental disorders ranging from schizophrenia to grandiose delusions. He also took credit for other murders that he could not have committed because he was incarcerated at the time.