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Keyontae Johnson's medical condition took a turn for the worse after he collapsed on the court during a game at FSU on Saturday.

Johnson collapsed as he returned to the court after a timeout. He appeared to trip and fell face first at mid court.

The 21-year-old was taken off the court on a stretcher and rushed to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where he was listed in critical condition, according to ESPN.

Johnson's grandfather provided an update on his grandson's condition in a telephone interview with USA TODAY Sports on Monday.

Larry DeJarnett said doctors placed Johnson in a medically-induced coma and they hoped to bring him out of a coma by Monday afternoon.

"They're just not sure. He may have had activity in the brain, so they induced the coma. They put him on medication to keep him sedated."

Johnson, the SEC's preseason player of the year, tested positive for Covid-19 earlier in the year. Coach Mike White said the team paused activities last month after several other players tested positive for the flu-like virus.

"Please keep praying for @Keyontae and his family. We all love him," Coach White tweeted on Saturday.
 

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A radical new California law will allow college student athletes the right to profit from their names and likeness while they are still in school.

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed the Fair Pay for Play Act into law at a Los Angeles barbershop associated with LeBron James's HBO show The Shop: Uninterrupted.

James, 34, celebrated the Fair Pay for Play Act on Twitter.com on Monday. "You the man Governor Gav! Appreciate you as so many many more as well!" he tweeted.

The new law, which takes effect on January 1, 2023, makes it illegal for California colleges to deny student athletes the opportunities to earn hard cash for the use of their names, images and likenesses in video games, advertising, apparel and sports gear.

Sheri Determan/WENN.com

The new act will benefit student athletes like LaMelo Ball, left, and Liangelo Ball, center, brothers of former Lakers star Lonzo Ball, right.

Student athletes will be allowed to earn money for sponsoring youth camps, just like professional athletes. They can also sign lucrative endorsement contracts with shoe companies, apparel companies, car dealerships, etc.

The law does not require colleges and universities to pay student athletes, but it collides head on with the NCAA's rules.

ATP/WENN.com

California is the only state that allows college student athletes the right to be paid for their own names and likeness.

According to Sports Illustrated, California colleges, the Pac-12 Conference, the Mountain West Conference and the NCAA will all challenge the legality of the new law.

A lot is riding on the line for California schools.

Once the Act goes into effect, California colleges will no longer be permitted to participate in national championships organized or sponsored by the NCAA. And California schools might be kicked out of the NCAA altogether.

But supporters of the law, including James, believe the pros of the new law outweighs the cons.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has amended its new rule that prohibited mega agents like Rich Paul from signing star athletes to exclusive management contracts. According to CBS, the "NCAA has amended its controversial agent certification requirements. A bachelor's degree is no longer required to represent players, as long as the agent is certified by the NBPA."

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Spencer Brown John Wilson

Appalachian State University officials have apologized for derogatory statements made by a white male tennis player during a tennis match against a black opponent at a HBCU.

College officials issued the apology on Monday after John Wilson, the black player, complained on Twitter.com about offensive racist statements made by Spencer Brown, who's white.

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LeBron James Lavar Ball

LaVar Ball is one of those annoying sports dads who lives vicariously through their more talented children.

Ball, 48, is the father of UCLA Bruins freshman star Lonzo Ball (pictured above) and Chino Hills (Calif.) High School standouts LiAngelo Ball and LaMelo Ball, a sophomore who recently scored 92 points in one game.

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NCAA title IX

The NCAA won't punish Catholic universities and colleges that file for exemptions from gender identity provisions in Title IX.

LGBT groups sent a letter signed by over 80 “lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBTQ), sports, religious and youth advocacy groups” to the NCAA on March 9.

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This post was edited on Oct. 17, 2015 @ 6:45 p.m.

Michelle Obama must be distraught at the news that her daughter was spotted playing beer pong and "taking shots" at a frat party on Rhode Island.

Us Weekly magazine confirms Malia Obama attended the frat party at Brown University while touring the institution of higher learning.

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Paul George

NBA star Paul George, 24, fractured his lower right leg during a USA Basketball scrimmage in Las Vegas on Friday, Aug. 1.

The injury occurred at the end of a fast break when George landed awkwardly and his leg collided into the basket stanchion.

George's gruesome injury is similar to the shearing leg fracture suffered by Louisville Cardinals' Kevin Ware during the 2013 NCAA basketball Tournament. The only difference being George's fractured bone did not protrude through his skin.

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