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Memphis PD

A Memphis police officer has been fired and jailed without bond on charges of kidnapping and murdering a man while on duty, FOX13 reports.

Patric Ferguson (left) was arrested Sunday after surveillance footage captured the uniformed officer take 30-year-old Robert Howard (pictured right) out of a home in the 3500 block of Twain Street and force him at gunpoint into his patrol car on Jan. 6.

Ferguson, 29, drove to Frayser Boulevard and Denver Street, where body cam footage captured the cop fatally shoot Howard in the back seat of the patrol car.

Ferguson dropped off the body at an undisclosed location, then returned the next day with an accomplice, Joshua Rogers, who helped him dump the body off a bridge.

Howard's body was fished out of the water by Memphis police on January 10 at Second Street near the Wolf River Bridge, police say.

Howard's girlfriend filed a missing person's report on Wednesday after she used an app to track his cell phone and found the phone at Lamar Avenue and Shelby Drive, according to WKYT.

Evidence on the victim's phone led them to Ferguson who confessed to murdering Howard. Ferguson was immediately terminated and charged with first-degree murder and aggravated kidnapping.

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Memphis PD

Rogers, 28, was charged with accessory after the fact for helping dispose of Howard's body, police said. Both men were charged with abuse of a corpse, and fabricating and tampering with evidence, according to an affidavit.

Mayor Jim Strickland spoke exclusively to FOX13, saying he was "horrified" to learn of Ferguson's crimes.

"It was good investigative work," Strickland said. "We've got video of the actual murder and he confessed."

Investigators built their murder case against Ferguson using surveillance footage and police body cam footage. A receipt from a hardware store revealed Ferguson purchased cinder blocks, chains and padlocks to weigh Howard's body down when he threw him in the river.

A search of Ferguson's phone revealed incriminating internet search history, including searches for "cleaning up crime scenes and how to destroy DNA evidence," according to the affidavit.

Strickland told FOX13 he hopes Ferguson spends the rest of his life in prison.

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President Donald Trump has promised an "orderly transition" of power after President-elect Joe Biden won the majority electoral college vote on January 6, 2021.

The outgoing President, who has repeatedly accused the Democrats of orchestrating a coup against him and stealing the November 2020 election, issued a statement on Thursday.

"Even though I totally disagree with the outcome of the election, and the facts bear me out, nevertheless there will be an orderly transition on January 20," Trump confirmed.

"I have always said we would continue our fight to ensure that only legal votes were counted. While this represents the end of the greatest first term in presidential history, it's only the beginning of our fight to Make America Great Again."

Trump released the statement through his deputy chief of staff Dan Scavino's Twitter account at 3:50 am ET Wednesday.

Trump spoke to his followers via his official accounts on conservative social media platforms GAB.com and Parler.com late Wednesday.

Trump's personal Twitter account was locked for 12 hours after he shared tweets and a video telling MAGA protesters to go home amid riots and bloodshed in Washington, D.C.

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Earlier in the day, MAGA protesters forced their way into the Capitol building and broke through doors leading to the offices of Congressional lawmakers, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Activists scrawled notes on Pelosi's desk and one protester walked off with her lectern.

CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

DC police sprayed tear gas at the protesters. One lawmaker reportedly suffered chest pains during the assault on the Capitol building.

Air Force veteran Ashli Babbitt, of Ocean Beach, Calif., was shot in the face by a DC police officer when she and others forced their way through a locked door.

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KUSI News

Babbitt, 37, was unarmed and on the other side of a locked door when the officer shot her through the door. The officer has not been identified. Babbitt was later pronounced dead.

Prior to the incident, Trump addressed his followers, who gathered maskless on the Ellipse near the White House: "We're going to walk down to the Capitol. We're gonna cheer on our brave senators and congressmen and women, and we're probably not going to be cheering, so much for some of them, because you'll never take back our country with weakness, you have to show strength and you have to be strong."

After Vice President Mike Pence refused Trump's direct order to block the electoral college vote by Congress, Trump called Pence a traitor and locked Pence's chief of staff out of the White House.

Trump was widely condemned on social media, with calls to have Trump removed from office by impeachment or through the invocation of the 25th Amendment.

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Renowned attorney Benjamin Crump issued a statement on Kenosha District Attorney Michal Gravely's decision not to file charges against Rusten Sheskey, a white police officer who shot a Black man 7 times in the back.

Jacob Blake, 29, was shot in August when Kenosha police officers attempted to detain him on an outstanding warrant for domestic assault and a sex crime.

Sheskey opened fire when Blake opened his driver-side door and reached inside the vehicle. Blake is paralyzed from the waist down.

"We are immensely disappointed in Kenosha District Attorney Michael Gravely's decision not to charge the officers involved in this horrific shooting," Crump said Tuesday.

"We feel this decision failed not only Jacob and his family, but the community that protested and demanded justice."

Gravely pleaded with residents to remain peaceful in light of his decision.

"Rather than burning things down, can moments of tragedy like this be an opportunity to build things?" he asked.

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Antioch PD

Jacob's shooting sparked protests, riots and looting last year. Teenager Kyle Rittenhouse, who is charged with killing two Antifa protesters, pleaded not guilty to all charges at a hearing on Tuesday.

Rittenhouse is currently freed on $2 million bond. A march trial date has been set, but his lawyer said the date is unrealistic.

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Facebook

A Mississippi judge was found dead in her home in an apparent homicide. Longtime justice court judge Sheila Osgood was found deceased on the floor of her home in Moss Point, Miss. on Wednesday morning.

Officers responded to the home to conduct a "welfare check" at the 3600 block of Davis Street, OANN reported. They knocked and attempted to make contact with anyone inside the residence but there was no response.

An hour later, officers responded to a second call to investigate a domestic disturbance at the residence. Upon arriving, officers heard gunshots and requested additional backup, according to a press release.

Police encountered a man in the front yard armed with a handgun. The man, who was later identified as a family member, complied with orders to drop the weapon.

An officer then entered the residence and found 65-year-old Osgood deceased on the floor.

While police were securing the home, Osgood's 45-year-old son, Gregory Jackson, approached and charged at the police with a knife. When Jackson refused orders to drop the knife, officers were forced to discharge their weapons, killing him.

The family member who fired the first gunshots was not arrested.

Copyright Disclaimer: I do not own the rights to the photograph(s) or video(s) used in this post. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" of photographs for purposes such as parody, criticism, commentary, news reporting, education, and research.

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Louisville PD

Breonna Taylor's boyfriend Kenneth Walker implicated her as the shooter when three Louisville cops burst into her apartment to serve a no-knock drug warrant in March.

Police were there serving a no-knock warrant stemming from taped jailhouse conversations between Taylor and her ex-boyfriend, Jamarcus Glover, who was the target of a narcotics investigation.

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Louisville PD

In one audio of a jailhouse call, Glover tells someone he and Taylor hadn't seen each other in two months.

Walker's words were captured on a police body camera after Taylor was killed in a hail of bullets.

About a minute into the video clip, when an officer asks which one of them fired at cops, Walker says, "It was her. She was scared."

But civil rights attorney Lee Merritt claims Walker misspoke, and that the tape will prove beneficial in a potential federal case against the cops who killed Taylor.

Merritt joined TMZ on "TMZ Live" Thursday to discuss what Walker said to Louisville cops on the scene in the chaotic moments after the deadly raid.

The video footage is part of a cache of documents released by Louisville police on Thursday. The material includes 250 videos, more than 4,000 pages of documents, and photographs that show Taylor and Walker holding an assortment of guns.

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Louisville PD

One social media photo that shows Taylor and Walker holding guns is tagged "Partners in Crime."

In one video, Walker repeatedly tells cops he and Taylor didn't know that the invaders breaking into their apartment was police.

Merritt says Walker's words may create some doubt as to who fired the shot that hit Louisville PD officer Jonathan Mattingly in the thigh -- severing an artery.

But he adds the video also shows Walker was very emotional and under intense duress.

Since the night of the raid, Merritt says Walker has insisted he's the one who fired his legally - owned 9mm handgun.

Although the grand jury did not indict any of the officers for killing Taylor ... Merritt says they're still pushing for federal charges against all three cops.
 

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Getty Images

A white police officer was charged with murder in the shooting death of an unarmed Black man. Wolfe City police officer Shaun Lucas, 22, was booked into the Hunt County Jail on Monday night. His bail was set at $1 million.

Lucas is charged with killing Jonathan Price, who was walking away from Lucas when the officer opened fire Saturday night.

Price was reportedly helping to break up a domestic dispute when he was shot by Lucas, the Texas Rangers said in a statement.

According to the statement, Lucas said he responded to the domestic assault call, where he encountered Price, 31, who was "involved in the dispute."

The statement said Lucas "attempted to detain Price, who resisted in a non-threatening posture and began walking away."

Lucas used a stun gun before shooting Price, who was pronounced dead at a hospital.

"The preliminary investigation indicates that the actions of Officer Lucas were not objectionably reasonable," the Texas Rangers said.

"When police arrived, I'm told, he raised his hands and attempted to explain what was going on," said civil rights attorney Lee Merritt in a Facebook post. "Police fired Tasers at him and when his body convulsed from the electrical current, they 'perceived a threat' and shot him to death."

A GoFundMe account started by former Major League Baseball third baseman Will Middlebrooks, who grew up with Price, netted over $50,000 in less than 24 hours.

"I'm sick. I'm heartbroken... and I'm furious," Middlebrooks said.

Update: Shuan Lucas has been released on $1 million bond.
 

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A 36-year-old man has been charged with the shooting of two Los Angeles County Shriff's deputies during an ambush earlier this month in Compton.

Deonte Lee Murray was charged with 2 counts of attempted murder in the September 12 ambush as they sat in their squad car outside a Metro bus station.

Murray has a long criminal history that includes attempted murder, gang-related crimes and weapons offenses.

The motive is believed to be "gang rivalry" with members of the Sheriff's department.

Murray is Black, 5-foot-7, and weighs 190 pounds.

Sheriff Alex Villanueva (pictured above) announced that public outrage over the shooting sparked private donations had pushed the reward for the suspect's capture to nearly $700,000.

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LASD

Both deputies, a 31-year-old woman and 24-year-old man, were shot multiple times, but have since been released from the hospital.

Murray was arrested Sept. 15 after being accused of shooting a man during a carjacking on Sept. 1 in Compton.

According to investigators, he shot the carjack victim in the leg and stole his black Mercedes sedan, which he used for his getaway. Murray was arrested following a high-speed car chase and standoff, authorities said.

Bail is set at $1.24 million. If convicted on all charges, Murray faces a possible maximum sentence of 25 years to life in state prison.
 

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Facebook; Getty Images

Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron has asked a judge to delay releasing documents in the Breonna Taylor case.

Cameron told the court he needed another week to prepare the transcripts and audio recordings for release.

In a statement, Cameron said he needed time to "redact personal identifiers of any named person, and to redact both names and personal identifiers of any witnesses, including addresses and phone numbers."

Cameron's request comes a day after he agreed to immediately release transcripts and recordings of his instructions to the grand jury.

The attorney general agreed to the judge's order after a male juror filed a motion on Monday demanding the transcript be released to the public.

The unnamed juror filed the motion seeking release of the documents because he believed Cameron misled the public.

A lawyer representing the juror said the grand jury was not given the option of charging Louisville Metro Police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove.

The 12-member jury was only asked to consider possible charges against Detective Brett Hankison, who was fired in June and was indicted by the grand jury for 3 counts unrelated to Taylor's death.

The juror also took issue with Cameron's assertion that the grand jurors "agreed" with his team's investigation.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron complied with a judge's order to turn over documents presented to the grand jury in the Breonna Taylor murder case.

AG Cameron agreed to the judge's order after a juror filed a motion on Monday demanding the documents be released to the public.

The unnamed juror filed the motion on Monday seeking release of the documents because the juror believes Cameron misled the public when he announced the Grand Jury's decision not to press charges against two of the three cops who fired into Taylor's apartment, killing her in March.

The juror accused Cameron of lying about the evidence that was presented to the Grand Jury. The motion asks the court to release the records "in the interest of justice, transparency, and accountability."

The juror claims Cameron blamed the grand jury for the decision while failing to answer specific questions regarding how the evidence was presented to them.

The juror took issue with Cameron's assertion that the grand jurors "agreed" with his team's investigation.

Legal experts doubted the officers would be charged with murder in Taylor's death because her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired on the police first.

John Sommers II/Getty Images

In related news, Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, was heavily criticized after she used a portion of her $12 million settlement with the city to buy a $800,000 mansion and a $200,000 Bentley.

Palmer is pictured with her attorney, Benjamin Crump, who received 30% of the settlement as part of his attorney fees.

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Charles Barkley suggests Breonna Taylor would still be alive if she had better judgment when choosing boyfriends.

The NBA legend faced public backlash on Thursday night when he said on "Inside the NBA" that "we do have to take into account that her boyfriend did shoot at the cops and shot a cop."

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Facebook

Barkley said Kenneth Walker's alleged drug dealings put Taylor in direct danger. Taylor, 26, was killed on March 13 when three plainclothes police served a no-knock warrant at her apartment looking for an ex-boyfriend, who was already in jail on drug charges.

Walker shot at the intruders, striking one officer in the thigh. The cops returned fire, killing Taylor who was standing in a hallway.

Nikki Nelson/ WENN

"So, like I said, even though I'm really sad she lost her life, I don't think this is something we can put in the same situation as George Floyd or Ahmaud Arbery," Barkley said, referring to unarmed Black men who were killed by police in America.

A witness told a Grand Jury this week that the officers identified themselves before taking the apartment door down. But Taylor and Walker, who were in bed when the police beat on their door, probably did not know they were officers.

Twitter users disagreed with Barkley's assessment.

@ItsaLearning tweeted:

"No, #charlesbarkley, he shot at intruders. These intruders, who happened to be Police, did not identify themselves. He had every right to defend himself and Breonna against whoever was breaking into his house unannounced."

And @ChatonsWorld wrote:

"He's misinformed. Her boyfriend shot at intruders. Nobody knew they were the police because they didn't announce themselves. Witnessing what happens when everybody thinks they need to share their opinion..."

Barkley also called for police reforms over defunding the police, since the Black community depends on the police for their safety.

"Who are black people supposed to call Ghost Busters when we have crime in our neighborhood? We need to stop the defund or abolish the police crap," he said.

A Grand Jury returned an indictment against one of the officers, Brett Hankison, who lost his job after the shooting. There were no charges directly related to Taylor's death.

On Thursday, Majic 107.5 host Ryan Cameron took phone calls from outraged listeners in Atlanta, who commented on the Louisville Metro Police Department "losing" the original no-knock warrant that set the tragedy in motion.