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A new study suggests the coronavirus mRNA vaccines may not be as effective when administered to obese people.

So far, only 15% of the U.S. population has been vaccinated against Covid-19. Of that number, less than 1% are Black.

The CDC even has a term for it: Black vaccine hesitancy.

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According to the news media, the vaccines are "safe and effective." Yet obese Black women are dying within hours after receiving their vaccine doses. A majority of Black women who reportedly died after receiving the vaccines are obese.

A new study out of Italy found that Pfizer's vaccines may be less effective in obese people who received both doses.

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute Regina Elena determined that obese people produced only half of the antibodies compared with people with a normal body mass index (BMI).

"Since obesity is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality for patients with Covid-19, it is mandatory to plan an efficient vaccination program in this subgroup," the study's authors wrote.

In addition to obesity, other risk factors for Covid-19 include respiratory disorders, heart disease, diabetes, HIV and smoking.

Researchers say further studies are needed to determine why the vaccines are less effective for obesity people.

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A Washington D.C.-area news anchor was suspended for fat-shaming obese vaccine recipients on Twitter.

Blake McCoy, who works for WTTG, a local Fox affiliate, was suspended after he tweeted his annoyance over obese people getting priority access to vaccines.

Obesity is one of the pre-existing conditions that gives people priority to receive vaccines in many states.

"I'm annoyed obese people of all ages get priority access before all essential workers," McCoy tweeted Tuesday. "When most stayed home, we went into work everyday last March, April, May and everyday since putting ourselves & loved ones at risk. Vaccinate all essential workers. Then obese."

His tweet didn't go over well with many on Twitter who retweeted his post to the attention of his employer.

After clapping back at some of his outraged followers, McCoy apologized and deleted the original tweet.

In response to a follower who noted his deleted tweet, McCoy said, "You're right, I deleted because frankly, who has the time to argue with strangers on the internet."

Twitter users called for McCoy to be terminated after he posted photos of maskless men partying at numerous gay clubs in Chicago and other cities.

McCoy, who is openly LGBT+, has engaged in risky behavior, such as hooking up with men he met on the Tinder dating app.

In a tweet dated Feb. 6, McCoy wrote: "Tinder date is arriving now for wine, pizza, and monopoly. We've never met. If I die tonight, I want you to know I had a good run. Stay well everyone."
 

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Covid-19 mRNA vaccines are causing an unexpected side effect in biological women. The still-experimental messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) vaccines have been administered to 65 million Americans.

Commonly reported side effects include pain around the injection site, headache, fatigue, muscle pain, and death.

But some women are complaining of an unexpected side effect after the second dose: swollen, painful mammary lymph glands that can mimic breast cancer.

"I panicked, I'll admit, initially," said Dr. Bridget Rogers, radiologist at Solis Mammography.

"I had a big, visible, painful lump," she told CBS4 Health Specialist Kathy Walsh. Dr. Rogers said she received her second dose of mRNA vaccine the day before.

"I tried to reassure myself by remembering that this is actually a sign that the vaccine was doing what it's supposed to do, activating your immune system," she said.

Still, she admits she had an ultrasound done just to make sure.

"I've been trying to forewarn women ahead of time," said Dr. Stephanie Miller, a breast surgeon and Medical Director of the Breast Program at Rose Medical Center.

She tells women to let the mammography center know if you've recently had a vaccine "So that we can have the right explanation for what we're seeing."

Mammary lymph glands are located in the arm pit and neck on the affected side.

Swollen, painful lumps in the armpit and in the neck under the jawline are among the first signs of breast cancer in some women.

Doctors urge women not to take the vaccine if you have a mammogram scheduled the next day because it may trigger a false breast cancer reading.

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Two women were so desperate to get the still experimental Covid-19 mRNA shots that they dressed up as "grannies" to skip the line.

Florida health officials say the two women aroused suspicion immediately.

"So yesterday, we realized a couple of young ladies came dressed up as grannies to get vaccinated for the second time. So I don't know how they escaped the first time," said Dr. Raul Pino, the director of the Florida Department of Health in Orange County, during a press briefing on Thursday.

According to Dr. Pino, the two women showed up to the Orange County Convention Center wearing bonnets, gloves and glasses -- "the whole thing," he said. The women wore disguises to make themselves eligible to receive the vaccination outside of a health care or long-term care facility setting.

The women had valid vaccination cards for their first injections, but there was an issue with their driver's licenses on the second go 'round.

Their dates of birth "did not match those they had used to register for the vaccines," said the Orange County Sheriff's Office in a statement. "The names, however, did match the registration."

The sheriff's office identified the women as Olga Monroy-Ramirez, 44, and Martha Vivian Monroy, 34.

The women were not arrested or cited. But security was increased at the vaccination site.

"This is the hottest commodity that is out there right now," the director said. "So we have to be very careful with the funds and the resources that we are provided."

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A former Detroit news anchor has died a day after receiving a Covid-19 mRNA vaccine. Karen Hudson-Samuels was found dead in her Detroit home by her husband, Cliff Samuels, CBS Detroit reported.

Hudson-Samuels, 68, worked at the country's first Black-owned television station. She also worked as a producer and news director at WGPR-TV.

"We suspect it may have just been a stroke but because of the normal side effects of the vaccine it may have masked that," Samuels told the news station.

"Hopefully we'll know soon from the autopsy report," he said.

"She was just a beautiful person," WWJ Reporter Vickie Thomas told WGPR. "It's such a huge loss for this community," Thomas said.

Over 1,200 Americans reportedly died within two weeks of receiving Covid-19 mRNA vaccines.

Drene Keyes, 58, died within hours of getting a vaccine at a Virginia facility on Feb. 6.

Keyes' daughter, Lisa Jones, told WKTR that her mother's job "made her eligible for the vaccine."

"Why are we allowing people with underlying conditions to be guinea pigs for a vaccine that is still in clinical trials and emergency use?"

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An emergency medicine doctor in New York sparked fury on social media when he called the Covid-19 mRNA vaccines "reparations for Black people."

Dr. Steven McDonald is a board-certified emergency medicine attending physician at New York Presbyterian Hospital.

His credentials make him uniquely qualified to comment on Covid-19 vaccines. But he angered social media users when he said Black people should consider the vaccines as "reparations" for 200 years of slavery.

"You can think of the vaccines almost as medical reparations," he told VICE. "It's the 40 acres and a mule, um, but of 2021. So we really should be giving this vaccine preferentially to people of color..."

Doctors and globalists have repeatedly claimed that Blacks and Hispanics are "disproportionately affected" by the coronavirus.

The reaction was swift.

Social media activist Tariq Nasheed tweeted: "So, now vaccines are reparations?"

A Twitter user wrote: "By that logic, the Tuskegee Experiment is “reparations.""

"These people are insane," wrote an Instagram user. "Cut us our checks & we'll do what we need to do for ourselves."

Another commenter wrote: "I just reached out to [Dr. McDonald] to understand his rationale behind that statement. Let's see if he replies. Crazy times we live in."

Meanwhile, the White House on Wednesday announced yet another "study" on reparations for people of color.
 

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Joe Biden upset different groups of people for different reasons during his first town hall as president in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Tuesday.

While discussing vaccinations, Biden claimed mRNA vaccines didn't exist when he was elected in November 2020.

"We didn't have a Covid vaccine when we came into office."

When asked how his administration will handle the racial disparities in vaccine distribution, Biden explained that Blacks and Hispanics don't know how to use the internet to find the locations to get the vaccines.

When a member of the audience asked if he would eliminate $50,000 in student loan debt, the president responded, "I will not make that happen."

Biden also raised eyebrows when he remarked on the increased rate of biracial couples in television commercials.

"Did you ever five years ago think every second or third ad out of five or six should turn on would be biracial couples? No, no I'm not, I'm not be facetious..."

He added that he was "hopeful" in the new generation: "They're not like us, they're thinking differently," he said.
 

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg expressed his concerns over the still experimental Covid-19 mRNA vaccines in a video leaked by Project Veritas.

Zuckerberg expressed concern that the mRNA vaccines may be modifying people's DNA.

Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encodes proteins of Covid-19 which are inserted into human cells to stimulate the immune system to make antibodies.

A successful mRNA vaccine has never been approved for use in humans in history.

In the leaked video, Zuckerberg expressed his concerns about the "long-term side effects" of "basically modifying people's DNA and RNA" to fight Covid-19.

"I share some caution on this [vaccine] because we just don't know the long-term side effects of basically modifying people's DNA and RNA," Zuckerberg said in the leaked Zoom video.

But in a public video several months later, Zuckerberg repeated Dr. Anthony Fauci's claim that the vaccines do not modify DNA or RNA.

First of all, DNA is inherent in your own nucleus cell. Sticking in anything foreign will ultimately get cleared," said Fauci.

But Fauci doesn't clarify whether he is talking about the foreign mRNA in the Covid-19 vaccines.

Any discussion of the Covid-19 vaccines modifying DNA is banned from the Facebook platform.

Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe said that Zuckerberg imposes standards on his users that he does not live up to himself in private.

"Isn't it interesting that Zuckerberg can vacillate and evolve his thinking on the subject of vaccines. But as soon as he's made up his mind, or appears to have made up his mind on a topic, he disallows the almost 3 billion Facebook users to do the same?," said O’Keefe.

He added: "Rules for thee, but not for me."

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A blood disorder that affects the platelets has been reported in at least 2 dozen people who received Covid-19 mRNA vaccines in the United States.

Thrombocytopenia is among the adverse effects reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) system, which is jointly run by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Thrombocytopenia is an abnormally low platelet count in the blood. A normal human platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood.

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Low platelets causes abnormal bleeding, weakness and fatigue.

Signs and symptoms of low platelet count are frequent nosebleeds, bleeding gums, bruising all over the body, longer periods in women, small red or purple spots on the skin, spontaneous bleeding under skin, blood filled blisters inside the mouth.

MSN reports that by the end of January, 32 cases of a decreased platelet count, 14 cases of thrombocytopenia, and 11 cases of immune thrombocytopenia were recorded in people who had received either Pfizer or Moderna COVID vaccines in the U.S.

If you notice any unusual signs of bleeding after getting the mRNA vaccine, contact your doctor or healthcare provider immediately.

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Rev. Drene Keyes, of Virginia, was anxious about receiving her first dose of the still experimental Pfizer mRNA Covid-19 vaccine. So anxious that she asked a co-worker to go with her to the vaccination site.

The 58-year-old, "gifted grandmother of six" was in the high-risk category for Covid-19 with multiple preexisting conditions including diabetes, morbid obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and sleep apnea.

Keyes' daughter, Lisa Jones, told WKTR her mom's job "made her eligible for the vaccine."

Keyes believed the vaccine would lessen her symptoms if she contracted the coronavirus.

Before she left home, Jones helped her put on her shoes.

"She was such a loving and generous person," Jones said.

A co-worker accompanied Keyes to a medical facility in Warsaw, where she got the injection on Saturday. Keyes waited the mandatory 15-minute observation period before heading to her car in the parking lot.

Her co-worker said she was getting into her car when she suddenly said, "Something is not right. Something's not right."

Keyes had difficulty breathing and began vomiting. She was rushed to VCU Tappahannock Hospital, where doctors administered Epipen (epinephrine for anaphylaxis), CPR and oxygen.

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"They tried to remove fluid from her lungs. They called it 'flash pulmonary edema,' and doctors told me that it can be caused by anaphylaxis," said Jones (pictured right). "The doctor told me that often during anaphylaxis, chemicals are released inside of a person's body and can cause this to happen."

Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction that can occur within seconds or minutes after exposure to a substance the person is allergic to.

People who suffer an anaphylactic reaction should receive an epinephrine injection immediately to counteract the allergen.

Signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction include itchy rash, swelling of the tongue and throat, difficulty swallowing, difficulty inhaling, shortness of breath and light headedness.

The onset of symptoms can occur within seconds or minutes.

Health officials previously cautioned people not to take the mRNA vaccine if they had a severe allergic reaction in the past.

The risks -- including death -- were spelled out in the documents that Keyes signed before she got the vaccine.

Still, Jones is demanding answers. She believes more testing should have been done before the vaccines were rushed to market for a virus with a 99.4% survival rate.

"Why are we allowing people with underlying conditions to be guinea pigs for a vaccine that is still in clinical trials and emergency use?" Jones questioned.

Jones told WTVR she hopes her mother's death serves as a warning to doctors and health professionals to pre-screen patients prior to administering the vaccine.

"My mom was wanting to protect herself, and it did not turn out that way," Jones told WBRZ.

Health officials insist Keyes did not die from anaphylaxis or a reaction to the vaccine -- despite ER doctors treating her for anaphylaxis.

The CDC is also investigating the deaths of a 56-year-old Florida doctor about two weeks after getting his first Pfizer vaccine, and a 60-year-old California healthcare worker who died four days after his second injection with the Pfizer vaccine.

"Drene Keyes believed mainstream media, government health officials, her doctors and Big Pharma that Pfizer's vaccine was safe and it would protect her," said Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

"Her faith and trust in those people and institutions may have cost her her life."