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Judge Amy Coney Barrett could be seated on the Supreme Court as early as Monday, Oct. 26, barring a last minute Hail Mary from Senate Democrats.

Democratic senators were noticeably missing when the Judiciary Committee voted to advance Barrett's Supreme Court nomination on Thursday.

There are a few more procedural hurdles in the way before Barrett is confirmed to the Supreme Court on Monday.

First, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will ask the Senate to move to executive session on Friday afternoon. Once that vote is complete, McConnell will immediately file "cloture" on the nomination.

A cloture petition to stop a filibuster -- which could delay Barrett's nomination -- can't be voted on until Sunday because it requires an intervening day (Saturday), according to Fox News.

Once the cloture petition is approved (on Sunday), Senate Democrats have 30 hours to throw that Hail Mary to disrupt Barrett's nomination.

This is the phase when the Democrats "found" an accuser who claimed she was raped by Justice Brett Kavanaugh when he was a teenager. That strategy delayed Kavanaugh's nomination to the bench.

That isn't likely to happen in Barrett's case.

After the 30 hours expires Monday evening, the crucial and much-anticipated confirmation vote begins Monday night.

If this timetable holds, the Senate could confirm Barrett as the 115th Justice on the Supreme Court around 8:15 p.m. EST Monday.

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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg has died. Ginsberg died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at her Washington, D.C. home on Friday, surrounded by members of her family. She was 87.

Ginsberg had twice been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and also underwent lung surgery in 2018 to remove cancerous growths.

Ginsberg revealed she was battling cancer again after she was discharged from Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. in July. She was admitted into a New York City hospital weeks later for a routine non-surgical procedure to correct a bile stent.

She was last seen in public in August when she officiated a friend's outdoor wedding.

Ginsberg was the first female Jewish Justice, and the second of four women to ever sit on the nation's highest court.

She was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Bill Clinton on June 14, 1993 and had served since August 10, 1993. Ginsburg became the second of four female justices to be confirmed to the Court after Sandra Day O'Connor, the two others being Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan, both of whom are still serving in 2020.

Following O'Connor's retirement in 2006 and until Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, Ginsberg was the only female justice on the Supreme Court.

During three separate interviews that were conducted in July 2016, Ginsburg criticized presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, telling The New York Times and the Associated Press that she did not want to think about the possibility of a Trump presidency.

She is survived by her daughter, Jane, and her son, James. Her husband of 56 years, Martin, died in 2010.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg underwent surgery to remove cancerous tumors in her lung, according to published reports.

Ginsberg, 85, was hospitalized in November after breaking 3 ribs during a fall in her office at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.

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A woman who accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct is refusing to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday. Christine Blasey Ford’s lawyer, Lisa Banks, says her client wants the FBI to investigate her allegations.

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The Democrats are pulling out all the stops to delay the confirmation of President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. A letter sent to Dianne Feinstein purportedly details a "groping" incident that occurred when Kavanaugh was a teenager in high school.

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Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, center, coasted through the final round of questions from senators during his Senate confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Thursday.

Kavanaugh faced the stiffest opposition from senators like Kamala Harris (D-CA), left, and Cory Booker (D-NJ), right.

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