Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Lil Yachty says the Georgia boycotts are a big waste of time because they won't change new voting laws.

New voter ID laws were put in place last month by Gov. Brian Kemp to even the playing field for Republicans.

Lil Yachty said he doesn't think boycotts in Georgia will help change "oppressive" voting laws in his home state, but he's got advice for people worried about getting to the polls.

TMZ caught up with the Atlanta rapper as he was leaving dinner at Delilah in West Hollywood, CA. TMZ asked Yachty about the impact of Major League Baseball, Hollywood film productions and other big businesses pulling out of Georgia in protest over the laws.

Corporations objected to the new voter ID law that requires identification to submit absentee ballots to vote in Georgia.

Democrats argue that IDs are "oppressive" against Black people who don't know how to apply for IDs.

Major League Baseball pulled its All-Star game out of Georgia in protest of the voter ID law. But critics pointed out that the league requires IDs to pick up season tickets.

ID is also required to get vaccinated in Georgia and other states.

Lil Yachty says the boycotts won't last forever because the Peach State is just too stubborn.

Yachty tells TMZ why he's not worried about a business exodus hurting Atlanta's economy, and he offers advice for voters.

Watch Yachty's interview below.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Kris Connor/Getty Images

Will Smith and director Antoine Fuqua have pulled their runaway slave movie out of Georgia due to controversial voter ID law.

Smith's new slavery film titled, Emancipation, was scheduled to begin filming on in Atlanta in June, but he is now looking for a new location.

Smith, who is starring in, as well as producing the movie, blamed "institutional racism," for his decision.

"The new Georgia voting laws are reminiscent of voting impediments that were passed at the end of Reconstruction to prevent many Americans from voting. Regrettably, we feel compelled to move our film production work from Georgia to another state."

The movie, based on a true story, will likely be filmed in Louisiana, where the actual events took place.

In the film, Smith plays a slave who escaped the plantation and joined the Union Army after he was whipped to within an inch of his life.

The historic photo of the ex-slave's scarred back, taken during an Army medical examination, became known as "The Scourged Back."

The photo was published by The Independent and Harper's Weekly in 1863, and served to embody the cruelty of slavery in America.

"It was the first viral image of the brutality of slavery that the world saw, which is interesting, when you put it into perspective with today and social media and what the world is seeing, again," Fuqua told Deadline last year. "You can't fix the past, but you can remind people of the past and I think we have to, in an accurate, real way."

Emancipation is the first film to pull out of Georgia since the new laws went into effect.

Major League Baseball pulled the All-Star game out of Georgia after Gov. Brian Kemp signed the new election bill into law in March.

The new election law requires identification to submit absentee ballots by mail.

Photo may have been deleted

Twitter

Rep. Park Cannon, the Georgia lawmaker who was dragged out of the Capitol building for knocking on Gov. Brian Kemp's door, will not be charged.

Cannon was arrested on March 25 and dragged to the Fulton County (Atlanta) Jail after she knocked on Kemp's door while he signed the voter ID bill into law.

The election bill requires voter ID to request and submit absentee ballots, limits the number of ballot drop boxes, and allows the Georgia State Elections Board to take over county elections boards if there are problems with ballot counting.

Cannon's arrest sparked outrage on social media when video of her arrest went viral.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that she will not pursue charges and the case is closed.

Willis said the police officers may have found her behavior annoying," but it did not justify putting together a grand jury.

Cannon faced charges of felony obstruction and disrupting the General Assembly session. If found guilty, she faced up to high years in jail.

"My experience was painful, both physically and emotionally, but today I stand before you to say as horrible as that experience was... I believe the governor signing into law the most comprehensive voter suppression bill in the country is a far more serious crime," Cannon said at a rally last week.

JASON REDMOND/AFP/Getty Images

Gov. Brian Kemp signed an election bill requiring voters to submit identification to vote by mail. If Georgians choose to use their driver's license, they must provide the correct driver's license number -- or their ballots will be rejected.

Photo may have been deleted

Photo may have been deleted

Democrats have launched a campaign to educate residents on the correct DL number to provide when submitting their absentee ballots.

Democrats are outraged over Kemp's new election law, which closes a loophole that allowed out-of-towners to submit ballots without providing an ID.

Lawmakers argue the new law is voter suppression. They say the law puts Black people at a disadvantage because they don't know how to apply for IDs.

Critics say the Democrat's argument against voter ID boils down to insulting the intelligence of black people.