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The feds are investigating an accidental shooting that wounded three people at a Breonna Taylor protest in Louisville, Kentucky.

The three victims were members of a Black paramilitary group who call themselves NFAC, an acronym for "Not F***ing Around Coalition."

The incident happened when a female trainee accidentally discharged her assault rifle into the crowd of marchers who were protesting the police murder of Breonna Taylor in Baxter Park on Saturday.

The victims were transported to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

The pro-gun paramilitary group is led by John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson (pictured center), who said, "We're dealing with humans who make mistakes."

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's office is heading up the investigation into the accidental discharge of an assault rifle.

Taylor was shot 8 times and killed in March when three plainclothes officers served a no-knock warrant at her home in search of a drug suspect who was already in custody.

One of the officers was fired this year, but protesters say they will not rest until all three are terminated.

In an unrelated incident, a protester was shot and wounded when another protester fired on a car as it drove through a crowd of demonstrators on Interstate 225 in the Denver suburb of Aurora on Saturday.

Police said a protester fired a weapon at the car, but missed and struck at least one person who was taken to a hospital in stable condition.

Initial reports stated two people were shot.

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The protesters were trying to draw attention to the death of Elijah McClain, a Black man who was stopped by police after a 911 caller reported him as suspicious in August 2019.

McClain fell unconscious after a cop placed him in a chokehold and a paramedic injected him with 500 milligrams of the sedative ketamine. He was later declared brain dead and taken off life support.

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Porsha Williams is cooling her heels in a Louisville jail cell. Williams was arrested while protesting the murder of Breonna Taylor by Louisville police officers in March.

The Real Housewives of Atlanta TV personality joined other protesters outside the home of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron in Louisville to demand justice for Breonna.

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Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was fatally shot multiple times in her own home during a bungled drug raid by three plainclothes police officers.

One officer has since been fired, but protesters say that's not enough. They won't rest until all three officers are let go.

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According to Williams' fiance Dennis McKinley, the reality TV star and mom-of-one was arrested alongside Women's March co-organizer Tamika D. Mallory, rapper Trae tha Truth, and Love & Hip Hop co-creator and star Yandy Smith, among others.

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Fans and friends admired Porsha's courage and willingness to give her freedom for what she believes in.

"She has always been fearless. You mess with her people, you mess with her," her sister Lauren Williams wrote on Instagram. "She takes the case of #breonnataylor personally and she's sacrificing work, time with her loved ones, and her comfort to make sure the offenders are held accountable for their actions.

"This is her passion, this is her purpose. God please protect them," she added.

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A registered behavioral health technician for Centria Healthcare in Saginaw, Michigan was fired Thursday after Internet sleuths "canceled" him for making disparaging remarks about Breonna Taylor.

Benjamin Holthaus is the latest casualty of social media's "cancel culture.” Internet sleuths tracked him down and doxxed him after he wrote an offensive post saying Taylor was not an emergency medical technician and accused her of being "deep in the drug game".

Taylor was shot multiple times in her bed by three plainclothes officers who executed a no-knock warrant at her home in the early morning hours. They were searching for a drug suspect who was already in police custody.

One of the officers was fired but the other two are still on active duty.

Instagram blogger @GossipoftheCity doxxed Holthaus (published his employee's name and phone number) and urged her followers to contact his employer, Centria Autism, who confirmed Holthuas was no longer employed there on Thursday.

"Thank you for sharing this information with us as that type of behavior does not align with our mission or values.

We were informed of this post last week and we have confirmed with our HR Department that this individual is not a current employee. We have requested removal of their association with our organization on social media through each platform."

 

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One of the police officers involved in Breonna Taylor's shooting death was fired for "blindly" firing 10 rounds into her apartment.

On Friday, the Louisville Metro Police Department announced the termination of Officer Brett Hankison for displaying "an extreme indifference to the value of human life" when he "wantonly and blindly" opened fire inside Taylor's apartment on March 13, while executing a no-knock warrant in search of a drug dealer who was already in custody.

"You used deadly force by blindly firing ten rounds into Breonna Taylor's apartment without supporting facts that your deadly force was directed at a person (who) posed an immediate threat of danger or serious injury to yourself or others," police chief Robert Schroeder said in a letter advising Hankison of his termination.

“In fact, the ten rounds you fired were into a patio door and window which were covered with material that completely prevented you from verifying any person as an immediate threat or more importantly any innocent persons present," the chief wrote.

"I find your conduct a shock to the conscience. I am alarmed and stunned you used deadly force in this fashion,” the chief added.

The LMPD shared the letter on Twitter.com on Friday.

Taylor, 26, and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker, 27 were asleep in bed when three officers broke down their front door.

Walker grabbed his firearm and shot at the officers, believing they were home invaders. Taylor was shot eight times in the ensuing chaos.

"Somebody kicked in the door and shot my girlfriend," a distraught Walker said in a 911 call.

Walker was not injured in the shootout but he was arrested and charged with attempted murder. All charges against him were later dropped and he was released.

Two other officers who discharged their weapons -- Sgt. Jon Mattingly and Det. Myles Cosgrove -- are still on the police force.

No arrests were announced.

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Jennifer Lawrence is using her considerable star power to call for justice for Breonna Taylor, the Kentucky woman who was fatally shot in her bed by police officers in Louisville, KY.

Lawrence created a new Twitter account to call for the police officers who killed Taylor to be brought to justice.

Breonna, 26, was fatally shot multiple times in her own home in March after officers entered her house with a no-knock warrant, searching for a suspect who was already in custody.

The three cops allegedly involved have not been charged or suspended.

In only her second post on a new Twitter profile created this month, Jennifer wrote, "#SayHerName #BreonnaTaylor," above a powerful statement demanding Kentucky's Attorney General Daniel Cameron hold them accountable.

"For three months since her murder Breonna Taylor's family, the people of Louisville, Americans across the country, and many around the world have called out for justice," she said in a statement. "And yet, those calls have gone unanswered. No arrests have been made, the officers responsible for her death remain employed by the LMPD (Louisville Metro Police Department), and disturbingly, the LMPD's own investigation report was woefully inaccurate."

The 'Hunger Games' actress also condemned the "erasure" of black women, stating that it could not "continue in America."

She was likely referring to the fact that Black women are raped or killed with barely any attention given to their stories.

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A lawsuit has been filed against the Louisville Metro Police Department after a Black woman was killed by three white officers who forced their way into her home.

Breonna Taylor, an EMT employee, was fatally shot in the early morning hours of March 13 when officers forced their way inside and "blindly fired" after they were met by gunfire inside the home.

Taylor, 26, was asleep in bed with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, who heard a commotion and went to investigate around 12:30 a.m.

The officers were at the wrong house, serving a warrant on a suspect who lived across town and was already in custody.

The cops breached the front door "without knocking and without announcing themselves as police officers," according to the suit filed by Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, who is being represented by attorney Benjamin Crump.

"The defendants then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life," the lawsuit alleges. "Shots were blindly fired by the officers all throughout Breonna's home."

Taylor was shot eight times and died in her bed. Walker, 27, was not hit. He was arrested and charged with assault and attempted murder on a police officer.

The lawsuit states Walker had a license to carry and kept firearms in the home for protection.

Crump is also representing the father of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black male who was shot and killed by 2 white men in Brunswick, Ga. on Feb. 23.

Crump called out the police department for not taking responsibility for the way their officers serve no-knock warrants.

"We stand with the family of this young woman in demanding answers from the Louisville Police Department," he said in a statement on Twitter.

A spokesman for the Louisville police said, "Due to an ongoing internal investigation into this situation, we are not able to comment at this time."