No photo

Getty Images

Feminists are outraged after Proctor & Gamble removed feminine symbols from packages and pad wrappers of Always menstruation products.

Procter & Gamble, makers of Always, announced the change on Monday after transgender activists demanded the removal of the female Venus symbol from all menstruation products.

The company took action after a few female-to-male (FTM) transgenders complained about the Venus symbols on the pads.

Blue_Cutler/Getty Images

"To ensure that anyone who needs to use a period product feels comfortable in doing so with Always, we updated our pad wrapper design," P&G said in a statement.

The company will remove the signs from all packages and pad wrappers as soon as December 2019 in the United Kingdom, with plans for the new package design to be distributed worldwide beginning next year.

Angry feminists called for all women and girls to boycott the company in response to what they say is a concerted effort by corporations to erase women.

P&G was unbothered by the calls for a boycott.

"For over 35 years, Always has championed girls and women, and we will continue to do so,” a Procter & Gamble official said in response to the public backlash.

"We're also committed to diversity and inclusion, and after hearing from many people across genders and age groups, we realized that not everyone who has a period and needs to use a pad identifies as female.
 

No photo

Thinx - YouTube.com

A television commercial is causing mass confusion among young people who apparently missed or misunderstood the ad's tagline at the end.

The commercial opens with a pre-teen boy telling his father, "I think I got my period." The next scene shows a man rolling over in bed to reveal a bloodstain on the sheet under him.

The commercial also shows men dealing with their periods in public restrooms and locker rooms. One man asks another man for a Tampon, and a high school boy nervously drops his pantyliners in front of a girl, who asks him if he needs her help.

The commercial caused confusion among young people on social media who questioned how boys and men can menstruate.

Many missed the ad's tagline at the end of the commercial - 'If we all had them, maybe we'd be more comfortable with them.'

But even those who read the tagline were baffled. Since when are we women ashamed of having periods?

Some viewers believe the people behind the commercial are men who assume women are ashamed of having periods.

No photo

Thinx - YouTube.com

Thinx claims to make underwear that absorbs your period.

"We're on a mission to empower every body [sic] with innovative solutions and social change," the company states.

The company's Twitter page promotes their undergarments under the hashtag #IfWeAllHadPeriods.

One YouTube viewer wrote: "I think [the ad is] mostly trying to deconstruct the 'stigma' about periods. I'd personally never heard of period shaming, but apparently some people think its a thing."
 

According to the NY Daily News, NYC public schools will begin educating young girls about menstruation and providing free feminine hygiene products, starting today.

Read more »