Photo may have been deleted

Screen grab: YouTube.com

Megan Thee Stallion dropped her much-anticipated album SUGA on Friday. The 28-year-old rapper also released the music video for her single "B.I.T.C.H.", which garnered 577K views on YouTube.

Despite a Texas judge warning him to clam up, Rap-A-Lot Records CEO J. Prince spoke out about Megan's contract dispute with her label.

J. Prince took to Instagram to share his thoughts about Megan's lawsuit against her boss Carl Crawford, CEO of 1501 Certified Entertainment.

Problems began when Megan signed a management deal with Jay-Z and Roc Nation. In a tearful video she claimed 1501 wouldn't let her drop new music.

She won a small victory in court when a judge granted a restraining order against Crawford preventing him from blocking her music release.

Photo by Mindy Best/Getty Images

"We have no problem negotiating with Megan but we do have a problem with dictators," Prince said, referring to Jay-Z and Roc Nation, whom he accused of "poaching" artists from Houston record labels.

The 54-year-old music exec noted that Megan's behavior is reckless and she's heading for self-destruction.

"Megan seems to be a perfect candidate for self destruction," Prince writes. "Any artist in the music industry will testify that a 40% profit share is a great deal especially for an unestablished artist that til this day has never delivered an album."

In a follow-up to his original post, Prince wrote:

"To end this I give credit to where credit is due. Megan along with her mother, who evidently could read (God rest her soul), negotiated a good deal. I extended my hand to meet with Megan, T Farris, and team personally for further negotiations. Unfortunately it never happened even though we’re all in Houston, because she’s being controlled by the very people who started this shit. The homie Carl was an angel in Megan's eyes when he was spending hundreds of thousands investing in her career. Now that he’s helped her become a successful artist she stopped paying him his percentage and views him as the devil. I'm glad money don’t make me. I make money."

Megan responded to Prince's posts, saying, "I am no one's property!"

 

Megan Thee Stallion - B.I.T.C.H

SR Rated: 2/5 roses
 

roses

Photo by BKNY / BACKGRID

A Texas judge has denied a motion filed by Carl Crawford's 1501 record label to lift Megan Thee Stallion's restraining preventing him from blocking her album release on Friday.

Crawford, CEO of 1501 Certified Entertainment, filed an emergency motion on Wednesday to dissolve a temporary restraining order preventing him from blocking her music release.

Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images

The former Los Angeles Dodgers star argued that she had no right to take the label to court in the first place, because he still has an ironclad contract that she signed.

But District Court Judge Beau A. Miller denied Crawford's motion, leaving the restraining order in place.

The judge, who must have been swayed by Megan's ample ASSets, stated simply, "the album at issue may be dropped for distribution beginning March 6, 2020."

Judge Miller also turned his attention to music honcho J. Prince, who sent subtle threats to Jay-Z and Roc Nation via social media, putting them on notice that he won't tolerate them trying to shake down 1501.

Photo by Ray Tamarra/Getty Images

In an Instagram post on Wednesday, J. Prince called out New York labels for stealing artists, which he says is a common practice.

"This is the same technique of the culture vultures. I didn't allow this to happen to me when New York and LA record labels attempted to take my artists - so they labeled me as malicious for fighting back. I didn't allow it then so I damn sure ain't gonna allow it to happen to 1501 records or any other independent record labels that I'm associated with."

Prince addressed Megan directly for allegedly running to Roc Nation and turning against Crawford who put her on.

But the judge ordered J. Prince to refrain from making "threatening or retaliatory social media posts or threats against" Megan, her agents, or her representatives.

Photo by BKNY / BACKGRID

The judge also slapped a gag order on Megan and Crawford, who both took to social media to air out their side in the grievance.

Both parties are prohibited from "communicating with the media concerning the underlying issues in this case without court approval."

In a tearful video on her Instagram stories on Sunday, Megan, whose real name is Megan Pete, complained the contract was one-sided and unfair when she signed it as a naive 20-year-old.

Photo by Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images

But Crawford hit back, telling Billboard magazine that Megan is a fraud and a liar. He said she was not the innocent 20-year-old signing her first record deal.

He insists she was 23 when she signed, which makes her 28 now, not 25 as she claims.

"You wasn't 20, you were 23 years old. You was a grown up. You're just a liar," Crawford said.