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Retired rapper-turned-podcaster, Joe Budden, arrived with his co-host Remy Ma to promote Revolt series "State Of The Culture" at the AOL Build Series in New York City.
 

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Kenya Moore was all smiles as she stepped out in New York amid rumors she might be reuniting with "husband" Marc Daly. Friends say the 49-year-old Detroit native is cool with sharing Marc with other women, because her options are limited.
 

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Pregnant actress Jodie Turner-Smith showed off her growing baby bump while out walking the family dogs with her husband Joshua Jackson in Los Angeles. The couple is expecting their first child.
 

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Formula 1 race driver Lewis Hamilton attended Tommy Hilfiger's AW Spring 2020 TOMMYNOW Runway Show as part of London Fashion Week. Lewis rocked dyed hair extension braids in his hair - a trend that was popularized by American rapper Tyga.

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Racism is everywhere, but British-born actress Jodie Turner-Smith and her husband, Joshua Jackson, are contemplating raising their child outside of the U.S. because of white supremacy.

"The racial dynamics over here are fraught," Turner-Smith told People.com. "White supremacy is overt. It's the reason I don't want to raise my kids here. I don't want my kids to grow up doing active shooter drills at school."

The 'Queen & Slim' star, 33, is expecting her first child with Jackson, 41. She said she has felt hostile reactions from the Black community over being an interracial couple.

"There was this wave of people who were upset that I was possibly married to a white man," she said. "In America interracial dating or marriage is not something that is as accepted. Certain people feel strongly against it, in both communities. I felt it from the Black community. It is so complicated. I don't want to give it too much energy."

She said she was initially excited to move to America and meet other Black people, but it felt like a "huge culture shock" because she claims she was "rejected by the Black community."

Turner-Smith and other British actors were criticized by the Black community for taking acting roles away from American-born Black actors.

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Actors Joshua Jackson and Jodie Turner-Smith are married. The couple quietly tied the knot in a civil ceremony at a courthouse over the summer, Us Weekly confirms.

A source told Us Weekly that Jackson is "so supportive of Jodie and loves to cheer her on."

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Rumors swirled that Jackson and Turner-Smith were married after sharp-eyed fans noticed an engagement ring on that finger when she attended an event with him in August.

Then in November, they made their red carpet debut together at the Queen & Slim premiere in Los Angeles.

A witness tells Us Weekly, "Joshua looked so thrilled to be there to support [Jodie]. He was all smiles and doting on her and her family all night. A total gentleman."

Turner-Smith showed off her dazzling engagement ring on her left hand which she rested on her abdomen, sparking rumors that she and Jackson are pregnant.

Jackson and Turner-Smith began dating in mid 2018. A source told Us Weekly that they attended singer Usher's 40th birthday party together in October 2018. The source noted that they "were all over each other" and gazing into each other's eyes as they danced together the whole night."

Photo by Joseph Marzullo/WENN.com

In August, the British-born actress shared a photo of the couple gazing into each other's eyes. She captioned the image: "Two people who only fancy each other a little bit."

Not much is known about Turner-Smith. The 33-year-old former model was born in England to Jamaican parents. She worked as a banker in Pittsburgh, and was convinced to become a model after meeting musician Pharrell Williams.

She made her acting debut as a vampire in HBO's True Blood.

Jackson, 41, previously dated actress Diane Kruger from 2006 to 2016. Their union did not produce children.

Kruger, 43, moved on with Walking Dead actor Norman Reedus. They welcomed a daughter in November 2018.

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Photo: Universal Pictures

The NY Times contributor Carvell Wallace penned an emotional review of the new movie Queen & Slim, in theaters everywhere on Wednesday, Nov. 27.

Wallace, a Black father of two teenagers, urges moviegoers to give Queen & Slim a chance. He says they might be among "the great love stories of all time."

Queen & Slim is about a Black couple who meet on Tinder and go out to a Cleveland diner for their first date.

The man (Get Out star Daniel Kaluuya) is a minimum wage Costco cashier whose deep faith in God is reflected on his vanity license plate that reads: "TrustGod."

Queen (played by British newcomer Jodie Turner-Smith) is an uptight defense lawyer and atheist. The date is a disaster from the start. The only reason she went out with him, she says, is because he looked sad in his profile photo, and she felt sorry for him.

Queen has an attitude because one of her clients was sentenced to die on Ohio's death row.

"Was he innocent?" Slim asks. "Does it matter?" she snaps. "The state shouldn't decide who lives or dies."

The movie's flimsy plot line is based on that argument.

After dinner, Slim drives Queen home. On the way, his car is pulled over by an aggressive white cop.

Slim is polite and courteous at first. But Queen, the defense lawyer, knows her rights and just won't stop talking (the film's director, Melina Matsoukas, was "haunted" by the footage of Sandra Bland's arrest).

When Slim asks the cop to hurry it up because he's cold, the cop draws his weapon, because, you know, he fears for his life.

Queen reaches for her cell phone to record the encounter while Slim and the cop struggle over the gun. The gun discharges, grazing Queen on the thigh. Now fearing for his life, Slim kills the cop.

Slim wants to call his folks and turn himself in. He has a good case for self-defense. But Queen, the defense lawyer, decides to throw her law career away by ordering Slim to go on the lam with her.

Matsoukas, who directed Beyonce's music video "Lemonade", takes the couple on a meandering journey from the Midwest to the Deep South.

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Universal Pictures

Their first stop is the home of Queen's Uncle Earl in New Orleans. Uncle Earl (Bokeem Woodbine) is a war veteran and a pimp. Among his scantily clad hookers is Pose star Indya Moore, a cross-dresser who helps Queen remove her box braids so she will be less recognizable while on the run.

Of all the eccentric characters Queen & Slim encounter on their journey, Moore is the least memorable. Yet Wallace spends time describing the moments between the biological female Queen and the male-to-female trans Moore.

"The camera lingers on them in the intimate act of hairdressing; cool light fills the room. Queen breathes slowly, feeling protected for maybe the first time in the film."

It isn't hard to figure out where Wallace is going with this: Queen didn't feel protected when she was with Slim, a heterosexual male?

Wallace was physically and emotionally moved by Queen & Slim. After the film ended, he went into a bathroom for an ugly cry. "I put my sunglasses on because I was bawling, my whole torso heaving," he wrote.

Wallace goes overboard in his praise of the movie, over-exaggerating the "love story" between the two hapless fugitives.

Unlike the real Bonnie & Clyde, who were in a longterm relationship, Queen and Slim barely knew each other. They weren't even planning to go on a second date before the fateful encounter with the cop.

Their brief relationship is described by Wallace as "true, active, life-affirming love... He allows her anger, makes space for her hurt. Isn't this what love is?"

"If you allow it to be, Queen & Slim can be one of the great love stories of all time," Wallace writes.

If Queen & Slim is considered to be the standard for mature, life-affirming love, it is no wonder the divorce rate in America is over 70%.