By Sandra Rose  | 

Troy Aossey / The Image Bank

School districts around the country include LGBT+ history and LGBT+ rights in school curriculum.

In one school district in Minnesota, heterosexual high school students are being asked to participate in LGBT+ sexual role-playing in the classroom.

The curriculum involves coaching children to role-play adult sexual scenarios.

The role-playing exercises are part of the "Comprehensive Sexuality Education" (CSE) program.

The curriculum was designed by Advocates for Youth, a group that is partnered with Planned Parenthood, according to reports.

The role-playing is part of the "3R" principle, which stands for "rights, respect, responsibility."

The teenagers are given examples of sexual relationships and they are asked to role play the scenarios.

The role-playing examples include:

"Terrence" is described as "You date girls you like, but haven't done much sexually with them; you've kissed a couple of them, but didn't find it very exciting. Now you feel very attracted to Morgan. When you kissed him last week, it felt wonderful, but also confusing. You just can't stop thinking about Morgan and imagining his touch. You think you want to have sex with him, but you don’t want your family or friends to find out, because they would disapprove."

Two girls, "Andie" and "Diana" are alone in a basement and considering having sex. Andie thinks Diana "is great and feel that this could be the relationship you've always wanted. You've never felt like this before and don't want to do anything to turn Diana off. You feel open to all kinds of things with Diana, including commitment and sex. You plan to use protection if you and Diana decide to have sex."

"Zee", a biological girl, is considering having sex with trans teen "Sydney", a biological boy who identifies as a girl: "Biologically you were assigned female at birth but you hate all of the boxes that society puts people in and identify as genderqueer. You work hard to have a gender-nonconforming appearance and style. You enjoy gender-bending and you feel like with Sydney you have finally met someone who really 'gets you.'"

Teenagers who are resistant to the role-playing exercise are taken aside and lectured about homophobia, intolerance and acceptance of others.

Then the entire class is asked "to reflect on what's happening and why. Direct the students back to your class ground rules — and reinforce the agreement to be respectful — and that making homophobic comments is not respectful."

Parents can opt their teenage children out of the class at any time. One school district denied asking elementary school children to role play.

Richfield Public Schools in Minnesota issued a statement to Yahoo News.

"We do NOT teach elementary students about anal sex, show them graphic images, or ask them to role play, as has been reported by some media outlets. There are no activities in the secondary curriculum that have students role-playing situations in front of the entire classroom."

Parents protested the curriculum at a Richfield Public School board meeting (below)