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The mother of the 6-year-old girl who was paddled by a school principal is under investigation after police interrogated her kids.

The family's attorney, Brent Probinsky, tells TMZ, the little girl and 2 of her siblings -- plus a cousin who lives in the home -- were pulled out of class Tuesday by officials with the Florida Dept. of Family and Children Services (DFACS).

Probinsky tells TMZ the unidentified mother is under investigation for reports of child neglect at home.

This comes as the mother filed a lawsuit against the School District for the paddling incident.

Melissa Carter, principal of Central Elementary School in Clewiston, is accused of paddling the child for damaging a school computer.

According to TMZ, the children were asked if their mother is abusive in the home, to which the children said no. Probinsky says the investigators then told him they wanted to follow up with the mother to ask why she didn't step in and intervene during her daughter's paddling.

Apparently, investigators were acting on a tip about the mom allegedly being neglectful at home. TMZ claims "there doesn't appear to be any evidence of that."

Probinsky says it's an outrage that law enforcement is investigating the mom, when the real culprit's on camera in the paddling video.

As Probinsky previously explained -- there's a number of reasons the mom didn't step in ... for one, she's undocumented and was afraid of repercussions.

Probinsky claims the the mother didn't know what was happening when she recorded the paddling due to a language barrier. However, Carter and the school clerk are both fluent in Spanish.

The school district is also investigating the paddling incident. Corporal punishment is not allowed in the school district.

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Michelle Obama told London schoolgirls they should view the coronavirus as a "great blessing" and an opportunity for growth.

Mrs. Obama spoke on Wednesday to schoolgirls at Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (EGA) School in London.

Obama said the girls should view the lockdowns and restrictions as a "great blessing". She said the Covid is an opportunity to learn how to navigate through life and "things that you're not necessarily prepared for."

"I would view this as a great blessing to all of you, right. Because right now you're learning how to get through something hard and uncomfortable and unpredictable," she said.

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Mrs. Obama gave a similar speech to her daughters, Malia and Sasha.

"And as I've told my girls, that's what life is. No matter how high you get, or how smart you are, or how successful, life will throw you things that you're not necessarily prepared for. And if you know how to get yourself through it, you will succeed."

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The former first lady's remarks caused an uproar on social media.

But Jo Dibb, executive headteacher at EGA, told The Times newspaper that she thought Mrs. Obama's advice was "great".

Dibb said viewing the coronavirus as something that will help us in the future is a "really positive way of looking at things."

"If we just spend our time just blaming everything and making excuses and thinking, 'Well, I don't have to do well at school because there's a pandemic', then we've lost anyway, so I think that's such great advice," she said.

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Latinx activists in Chicago protested renaming a middle school after Barack and Michele Obama on Tuesday.

The activists are against the school board renaming Jefferson Middle School to Barack & Michelle Obama Middle School.

The group protested before a hearing of the Waukegan Community Unit School District 60 Board of Education, the Chicago Tribune reported.

The school board held its first in-person meeting on Tuesday at the Brookside campus of Waukegan High School.

According to the Tribune, they chose not to vote on renaming one of two middle schools after the Obamas.

Another meeting is scheduled for April 13 at 7 p.m. at the Brookside Campus. Latinx activists vow to hold demonstrations at that board meeting as well.

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Oscar Arias, a Waukegan native and former student, said Obama deported more than 3 million Mexicans during his two terms. While his successor, former President Donald Trump, deported less people.

Arias said he still remembers the fearful looks on the faces of fellow students who arrived home to find their parents were deported.

He said, the fear in their eyes "still resonates with me."

Arias suggested renaming the middle school after the late U.S. Congressman John L. Lewis.

"Lewis truly embodies the progressive and multicultural spirit of Waukegan," Arias said.

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Proud mom Vanessa Bryant is celebrating her daughter Natalia Bryant getting accepted into the University of Southern California (USC) on Tuesday.

The 18-year-old is seen jumping up and down in a video shared on her mom's Instagram page.

In the video, Natalia, wearing a USC top, shouts: "I got in!"

'Nessa captioned the clip:

"Tears of joy. I'm SO happy for you Nani! I know daddy is so PROUD OF YOU. I am so PROUD OF YOU!! Your hard work and dedication was so worth it. You pushed through the most excruciating pain imaginable and you succeeded. I wish Daddy and Gigi were physically here to celebrate but I know they’re here in spirit. We love you so much! #USC #Trojan #FightOn."

Natalia is one of NBA legend Kobe Bryant's four daughters. The former Lakers star and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna, tragically died in a helicopter crash in January 2020.

Vanessa Bryant was left behind to raise their minor children, Bianka, 4, and 20-month-old Capri, by herself.

She said Kobe and Gianna inspire her to keep going every day.

"I guess the best way to describe it is that Kobe and Gigi motivate me to keep going," she said previously. "They inspire me to try harder and be better every day. Their love is unconditional and they motivate me in so many different ways."
 

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A San Francisco school board member refuses to resign after her old tweets resurfaced calling Asian Americans "house ni**ers" who "embrace white supremacist thinking" to get ahead.

School board Vice President Alison Collins is under fire for her 2016 tweets attacking Asian Americans. On Sunday, 19 school administrators called for Collins to resign, but she refused.

In a series of tweets from 2016, Collins asked her Twitter followers to send her examples of anti-Black racism or bullying by Asian students to combat anti-Black racism.

"I'm looking to combat anti-black racism in the Asian community at my daughters' mostly Asian Am school," she tweeted.

In a follow-up tweet she wrote, "Many Asian Ss and Ts I know won't engage in critical race convos unless they see how they are impacted by white supremacy."

In another tweet she noted that Asians "use white supremacist thinking to assimilate and 'get ahead'."

"Where are the vocal Asians speaking up against Trump? Don't Asian Americans know they are on his list as well?"

School officials called for Collins to resign her position. They said Collins' tweets "perpetuate gross and harmful stereotypes and leave no room for nuance or potential misunderstanding".

Multiple news media outlets referred to Collins's race as "Black" and they point to Collins as an example of anti-Asian racism in the Black community.
 

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Zoom Inc.

A law professor was fired from Georgetown University after she said Black students always performed at the bottom of her class every semester.

Professor Sandra Sellers made the statement during a Zoom meeting with a colleague on Feb. 21.

The colleague, Professor David Batson, was placed on administrative leave on Thursday for not correcting Sellers.

Dean Bill Treanor announced on Thursday that Sellers, 62, was let go after viewing the video that showed Sellers complaining about a Black law student.

"You know what? I hate to say this," she told Batson. "I end up having this angst every semester, that a lot of my lower ones are blacks."

She continued: "It happens almost every semester, and it's like, oh, come on. You know, we get some really good ones but there also usually some of them that are just plain at the bottom," Sellers said.

The Black Law Students Association said the student was the only Black person in the class this semester.

The prestigious law school was attended by former first daughter Tiffany Trump.

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Apollo Beach, Florida middle school educator and male model Thedartis M. Demps Jr. is today's Morning Wood.

He was recommended by a loyal reader who wanted others to see the good qualities in this man of God.

Follow Thedartis on Instagram.com @thedartisdempsjr. And don't forget to tell him you saw him on Sandrarose.com!

Thedartis is a proud single dad to a 7-year-old adopted son, Emmanuel Demps. In a glowing tribute to his son on Instagram, he wrote: "I remember when I first got into foster care people were so negative. They said 'I wouldn't take anybody else's kids in', 'I don't see how you can do it???', 'Them children are the worst kid ever with the most problems?'. I am happy to say my boy you have been the example of what God can do. All of the trauma you have experienced, you have [shaken] all of that off and become a new child. I am proud to say I am the father of a son who made the honor roll all year!!"

MEN: If you would like to be considered for MORNING WOOD, submit your Instagram link of a few of your best photos (including shirtless shots) to sandra @ sandrarose.com (remove spaces). Please keep your emails short.

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Center for Disease Control Director Robert Redfield says suicides and drug overdoses have surpassed the death rate for COVID-19 among young people in America.

Redfield said lockdowns and lack of public schooling negatively impacts mental health among young people.

"We're seeing, sadly, far greater suicides now than we are deaths from COVID," Redfield testified in a Buck Institute Webinar. "We're seeing far greater deaths from drug overdose that are above excess that we had as background than we are seeing the deaths from COVID."

About 146,000 people have died from COVID or COVID-related causes, according to CDC data.

Federal data recorded 48,000 deaths from suicide and at least 71,000 deaths from drug overdoses in 2018.

The Chicago Sun-Times reviewed specifically black populations. In Cook County, Illinois, the number of suicide deaths among Black people is already higher than for all of 2019.

According to the American Medical Association, there has been a 40% increase in suicides and drug overdoses in Colorado in 2020. The number of calls to suicide hotlines have increased 48 percent.

Between March 15 and April 29, as many people committed suicide in Queens, New York than did between January 1 and April 29 the year prior.

Hopelessness and despair amid job uncertainty and the ongoing lockdowns have impacted mental health among children, teenagers and young adults in this country.

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The CDC has pushed for children to return to schools and adults to return to work as the deaths from COVID-19 have reached a new low.

Just 300+ people died from COVID in the U.S. last week, according to the CDC.

Redfield said he's "absolutely comfortable" with his grandchildren returning to school in the fall.

40 million jobs have been lost to the economic shutdown caused by the pandemic, compared to 2.6 million jobs lost in all of 2008 when the SARS/H1N1 virus arrived in the U.S.

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Rapper Future Hendrix knows the importance of a good education. The "Mask Off" rapper is giving scholarships to new college students in Georgia amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The father-of-6 invited high school graduates to apply for the "I'm Still a Dreamer" Georgia COVID-19 Scholarship, funded through his FreeWishes Foundation, by submitting videos detailing how the global health crisis has personally affected their lives.

"You don't have to be in the perfect situation or come from the perfect background to reach for your dreams," Future shared in a statement. "Despite this COVID-19 pandemic, I encourage all dreamers to continue to dream big."

Applicants must meet certain criteria to be eligible for the grants, which are capped at $2,500. Submissions will be accepted until July 27. The lucky recipients will be announced on 4 August.

For more information visit freewishes.org/2020-scholarship-info.

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Getty Images, Twitter.com

Teachers are being encouraged to use a "Gender Snowperson" graphic to teach students about gender identity in sex education classes.

The gender snowperson image was tweeted by Teacher2Teacher, a left leaning nonprofit organization that provides lesson plans and other resources to teachers.

Teacher2Teacher is sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

The organization identified Johnny Cole, a "diversity officer" for the Lexington School District, as the source of the image.

The image shows a genderless snowman on a board accompanied by stickers that explains the gender identity ideology. One sticker says:

"Gender Identity
Girl, Boy, Neither
Who you are and how you feel as a person."

Another sticker reads:

"Sexual orientation
Who you love or are attracted to".

A third sticker says:

Sex Assigned at Birth
Girl, Boy, Intersex
Pronoun assigned at birth".

Twitter users were confused and baffled by the agenda behind the lesson.

"What is the target age for this lesson?" asked one Twitter user.

"This is just awful. This is not something prepubescent children should have to deal with," wrote another user.

A third user tweeted: "Why is the snowman white?".