By Sandra Rose  | 

Amy Sussman/Getty Images

Violence hit close to home for Fox News commentator Gianno Caldwell who often covers the city's rising crime rate.

On Saturday, Caldwell shared the tragic news that his teenage brother was shot and killed in Chicago, on Friday.

"Yesterday was the worst day of my existence," Caldwell tweeted alongside a photo of himself and his 18-year-old brother, Matthew. "I received a call informing me that my teenage baby brother was murdered on the south side of Chicago. Never could I have imagined my baby brother’s life would be stolen from him. Please keep my family in your prayers."

In another recent post, Caldwell shared a "Father's Day" message from Matthew.

Caldwell wrote: "My little brother has never met his father and as devastating as this is, I am thankful to God for choosing me to be his big brother/father figure."

Photo may have been deleted

Instagram/@giannocaldwell

Matthew is pictured at right during a recent family dinner in Chicago.

Caldwell previously criticized Chicago's leaders for being too soft on crime – after then-President Donald Trump offered federal resources to fight violent crime.

"Why? Because [then-Mayor] Rahm Emanuel disagreed with Trump's politics," Caldwell said.

"I guess the Black bodies dying in the streets of Chicago didn't constitute an urgent enough issue for Emanuel to welcome the president's help."

"I'm absolutely disgusted by the violence that continues in my hometown," he said on a Fox News panel discussion about the shooting of a Chicago police officer during a traffic stop.

Caldwell also called out Mayor Lori Lightfoot's soft-on-crime policies, "If you're going to have these soft-on-crime measures, you're never going to get the crime problem under control, whether it be in Chicago, whether it be in Philadelphia, Detroit, wherever it may be."

"These policies must change, and they got to get tough and they got to get tough immediately, otherwise we're going to see more and more people dying in the streets daily," Caldwell added.