Photo may have been deleted

Louisville PD

Breonna Taylor's boyfriend Kenneth Walker implicated her as the shooter when three Louisville cops burst into her apartment to serve a no-knock drug warrant in March.

Police were there serving a no-knock warrant stemming from taped jailhouse conversations between Taylor and her ex-boyfriend, Jamarcus Glover, who was the target of a narcotics investigation.

Photo may have been deleted

Louisville PD

In one audio of a jailhouse call, Glover tells someone he and Taylor hadn't seen each other in two months.

Walker's words were captured on a police body camera after Taylor was killed in a hail of bullets.

About a minute into the video clip, when an officer asks which one of them fired at cops, Walker says, "It was her. She was scared."

But civil rights attorney Lee Merritt claims Walker misspoke, and that the tape will prove beneficial in a potential federal case against the cops who killed Taylor.

Merritt joined TMZ on "TMZ Live" Thursday to discuss what Walker said to Louisville cops on the scene in the chaotic moments after the deadly raid.

The video footage is part of a cache of documents released by Louisville police on Thursday. The material includes 250 videos, more than 4,000 pages of documents, and photographs that show Taylor and Walker holding an assortment of guns.

Photo may have been deleted

Louisville PD

One social media photo that shows Taylor and Walker holding guns is tagged "Partners in Crime."

In one video, Walker repeatedly tells cops he and Taylor didn't know that the invaders breaking into their apartment was police.

Merritt says Walker's words may create some doubt as to who fired the shot that hit Louisville PD officer Jonathan Mattingly in the thigh -- severing an artery.

But he adds the video also shows Walker was very emotional and under intense duress.

Since the night of the raid, Merritt says Walker has insisted he's the one who fired his legally - owned 9mm handgun.

Although the grand jury did not indict any of the officers for killing Taylor ... Merritt says they're still pushing for federal charges against all three cops.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook; Getty Images

Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron has asked a judge to delay releasing documents in the Breonna Taylor case.

Cameron told the court he needed another week to prepare the transcripts and audio recordings for release.

In a statement, Cameron said he needed time to "redact personal identifiers of any named person, and to redact both names and personal identifiers of any witnesses, including addresses and phone numbers."

Cameron's request comes a day after he agreed to immediately release transcripts and recordings of his instructions to the grand jury.

The attorney general agreed to the judge's order after a male juror filed a motion on Monday demanding the transcript be released to the public.

The unnamed juror filed the motion seeking release of the documents because he believed Cameron misled the public.

A lawyer representing the juror said the grand jury was not given the option of charging Louisville Metro Police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove.

The 12-member jury was only asked to consider possible charges against Detective Brett Hankison, who was fired in June and was indicted by the grand jury for 3 counts unrelated to Taylor's death.

The juror also took issue with Cameron's assertion that the grand jurors "agreed" with his team's investigation.

Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron complied with a judge's order to turn over documents presented to the grand jury in the Breonna Taylor murder case.

AG Cameron agreed to the judge's order after a juror filed a motion on Monday demanding the documents be released to the public.

The unnamed juror filed the motion on Monday seeking release of the documents because the juror believes Cameron misled the public when he announced the Grand Jury's decision not to press charges against two of the three cops who fired into Taylor's apartment, killing her in March.

The juror accused Cameron of lying about the evidence that was presented to the Grand Jury. The motion asks the court to release the records "in the interest of justice, transparency, and accountability."

The juror claims Cameron blamed the grand jury for the decision while failing to answer specific questions regarding how the evidence was presented to them.

The juror took issue with Cameron's assertion that the grand jurors "agreed" with his team's investigation.

Legal experts doubted the officers would be charged with murder in Taylor's death because her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired on the police first.

John Sommers II/Getty Images

In related news, Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, was heavily criticized after she used a portion of her $12 million settlement with the city to buy a $800,000 mansion and a $200,000 Bentley.

Palmer is pictured with her attorney, Benjamin Crump, who received 30% of the settlement as part of his attorney fees.

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Charles Barkley suggests Breonna Taylor would still be alive if she had better judgment when choosing boyfriends.

The NBA legend faced public backlash on Thursday night when he said on "Inside the NBA" that "we do have to take into account that her boyfriend did shoot at the cops and shot a cop."

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

Barkley said Kenneth Walker's alleged drug dealings put Taylor in direct danger. Taylor, 26, was killed on March 13 when three plainclothes police served a no-knock warrant at her apartment looking for an ex-boyfriend, who was already in jail on drug charges.

Walker shot at the intruders, striking one officer in the thigh. The cops returned fire, killing Taylor who was standing in a hallway.

Nikki Nelson/ WENN

"So, like I said, even though I'm really sad she lost her life, I don't think this is something we can put in the same situation as George Floyd or Ahmaud Arbery," Barkley said, referring to unarmed Black men who were killed by police in America.

A witness told a Grand Jury this week that the officers identified themselves before taking the apartment door down. But Taylor and Walker, who were in bed when the police beat on their door, probably did not know they were officers.

Twitter users disagreed with Barkley's assessment.

@ItsaLearning tweeted:

"No, #charlesbarkley, he shot at intruders. These intruders, who happened to be Police, did not identify themselves. He had every right to defend himself and Breonna against whoever was breaking into his house unannounced."

And @ChatonsWorld wrote:

"He's misinformed. Her boyfriend shot at intruders. Nobody knew they were the police because they didn't announce themselves. Witnessing what happens when everybody thinks they need to share their opinion..."

Barkley also called for police reforms over defunding the police, since the Black community depends on the police for their safety.

"Who are black people supposed to call Ghost Busters when we have crime in our neighborhood? We need to stop the defund or abolish the police crap," he said.

A Grand Jury returned an indictment against one of the officers, Brett Hankison, who lost his job after the shooting. There were no charges directly related to Taylor's death.

On Thursday, Majic 107.5 host Ryan Cameron took phone calls from outraged listeners in Atlanta, who commented on the Louisville Metro Police Department "losing" the original no-knock warrant that set the tragedy in motion.

Photo may have been deleted

Family handout

Only one out of three Louisville police officers was charged in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

The three officers were serving a no-knock drug warrant at Taylor's apartment on March 13 when Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire on them, hitting one of the cops in the thigh.

The officers returned fire, killing Taylor, who was shot multiple times. The Grand Jury heard from a witness who said the officers announced themselves before breaching the front door and entering the apartment.

They also heard that Taylor was not killed in her bed as was originally reported by the news media. She was standing in a hallway when she was fatally shot 5 times.

Photo may have been deleted

Louisville Metro PD

Brett Hankison (pictured left), who was fired in June, was charged with three felony counts of wanton endangerment. Bail was set at $15,000 and a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Two other officers involved in the shooting, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly (center) and Detective Myles Cosgrove (right), were justified in their use of force, state Attorney General Daniel Cameron said at a press conference Wednesday.

Louisville police were under a state of emergency before a Grand Jury announced the single indictment on Wednesday.

In anticipation of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer invoked a 72-hour curfew, effective Wednesday night, from 9 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

Last week, Fischer announced the city agreed to a $12 million with Taylor's family that included police reforms.

Photo may have been deleted

Family handout

The city of Louisville has agreed to a $12 million settlement with the family of Breonna Taylor. The settlement was announced on Tuesday.

Taylor, 26, was shot to death by police in her apartment six months ago. The deal will include police reforms including a requirement that commanders approve all search warrants before going before a judge, a source told the Courier Journal.

The news of a settlement comes as a grand jury prepares to review evidence in the case this week.

The largest amount Louisville has ever paid in a settlement was $8.5 million to Edwin Chandler in 2012, the Courier Journal reported.

Chandler was wrongfully imprisoned for more than nine years after Detective Mark Handy perjured himself.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook

The family of Breonna Taylor is losing confidence in the Louisville prosecutor's office after news leaked of a plea deal offered to her ex-boyfriend.

The family's attorney Ben Crump appeared on "TMZ Live" Tuesday to discuss the shocking news about local prosecutors trying to smear Breonna by falsely claiming she was a drug trafficker.

Unfounded rumors have spread that Breonna's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, used her apartment as a stash house for drugs. But no drugs were found in her apartment after she was shot multiple times and killed by three undercover police officers in March.

Walker opened fire on the officers - wounding one - when they executed a no-knock search warrant at Breonna's home on March 13. He initially believed the officers were home invaders.

Walker was arrested on attempted murder and drug charges, which were later dropped and he was released.

The plea deal required Walker to implicate Breonna as a willing participant in his drug activities.

Crump says he's not buying prosecutors' claim the plea deal was merely a draft written early on in negotiations. He tells TMZ it's just another piece of evidence that local authorities were trying to cover up Breonna's killing to protect the police.

Crump says the plea deal proves they were out to sully Breonna's character and that her family doubts Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron will seek justice for Breonna.

Crump tells TMZ, Breonna's family is losing faith in the process, because Cameron, a Black Republican, still has not announced charges against the officers involved in Breonna's killing.

Crump insists the family only wants one thing -- equal treatment under the law.

Meanwhile, Walker has filed a lawsuit seeking monetary damages from the City of Louisville and the Louisville Metro Police for assault, battery, false arrest and imprisonment, malicious prosecution, abuse of process and negligence.

Photo may have been deleted

Wireimage, Getty Images

Porsha Williams (left) and Yandy Smith were both arrested while demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, an emergency medical worker who was killed by police in her Louisville home in March.

The reality TV personalities were at a protest for Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky on Tuesday when they were cuffed and booked.

The pair, who star in Bravo's The Real Housewives of Atlanta and VH1's Love & Hip-Hop respectively, were among 68 people arrested while calling for the arrest of two cops who fatally shot Taylor multiple times during a bungled drug raid after three officers executed a no-knock warrant at her home.

The protest followed BreonnaCon - an event that spanned several days focused on bringing the community together to get justice for Taylor - and saw protesters march from South Central Park to the Louisville Metro Police Department Training Academy.

Police blocked protesters from going past the Denny Crum Overpass, and charged those taken into custody with obstructing the roadway and disorderly conduct.

Williams shared a photo of her and Smith sitting in the street with their fists raised in front of a line of cops. She wrote in the caption: "SAY HER NAME #BreonnaTaylor."
 

View this post on Instagram

SAY HER NAME ? #BreonnaTaylor ??

A post shared by #PorshaWilliams (@porsha4real) on

Meanwhile, Smith posted a clip of herself being escorted away by cops amid the protest, and penned: "If we don't get no justice." She captioned another protest video: "Matter fact you ain't gonna take me sitting down. I'm standing my ground!!!!!!!!"

Both Williams and Smith were also arrested following a similar protest in Louisville in July, which took place at the home of Attorney General Daniel Cameron.

It has been over five months since Breonna Taylor was killed. None of the officers have been arrested as yet, with one of the three fired for use of deadly force in June.

Louisville's mayor, City Council and the state's governor are all Democrats.
 

View this post on Instagram

If we don’t get no justice

A post shared by Yandy Smith-Harris (@yandysmith) on


 

Copyright Disclaimer: I do not own the rights to the photograph(s) or video(s) used in this post. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" of photographs for purposes such as parody, criticism, commentary, news reporting, education, and research.

John Sommers II/Getty Images

Breonna Taylor's mother and legal team met with Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron this week.

On Thursday, Aug. 13, Tamika Palmer, Breonna's mother, (center) and co-counsels Benjamin Crump (left) and Lonita Baker (right) held a news conference in front of Louisville City Hall.

Crump said he expects there will be criminal charges against the three plainclothes officers who shot and killed Taylor while executing a no-knock warrant at her home in March. They were searching for a drug suspect who was already in custody.

"I absolutely expect there to be charges based on the evidence," Crump told reporters.

"One hundred and fifty days," Palmer said. "Every day is still March the 13th."

Photo may have been deleted

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black EMT, was asleep in the early hours of March 13 when three cops served a no-knock narcotics search warrant at her home.

Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, opened fire on the intruders, wounding one of the officers in the leg. The cops returned fire, killing Taylor. Walker was not injured in the shootout. He was arrested but later released without charges.

Former cop Brett Hankison was fired by Louisville Metro Police Department in June. Two other officers — Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove — remain on administrative leave.

Baker said the attorney general didn't reach out to the family earlier because he was fearful it could compromise the investigation.

"It really speaks to why we should not have the police policing themselves," Crump said, "because we lost two months while we were letting them try to figure out how to justify the unjustifiable. And so now we're waiting on ballistics tests over 150 days later?"

The attorney general's office released a statement after the meeting:

"The meeting provided an opportunity for Attorney General Cameron to personally express his condolences to the family. The investigation remains ongoing, and our Office of Special Prosecutions continues to review all the facts in the case to determine the truth."

Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

The feds are investigating an accidental shooting that wounded three people at a Breonna Taylor protest in Louisville, Kentucky.

The three victims were members of a Black paramilitary group who call themselves NFAC, an acronym for "Not F***ing Around Coalition."

The incident happened when a female trainee accidentally discharged her assault rifle into the crowd of marchers who were protesting the police murder of Breonna Taylor in Baxter Park on Saturday.

The victims were transported to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

The pro-gun paramilitary group is led by John "Grandmaster Jay" Johnson (pictured center), who said, "We're dealing with humans who make mistakes."

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's office is heading up the investigation into the accidental discharge of an assault rifle.

Taylor was shot 8 times and killed in March when three plainclothes officers served a no-knock warrant at her home in search of a drug suspect who was already in custody.

One of the officers was fired this year, but protesters say they will not rest until all three are terminated.

In an unrelated incident, a protester was shot and wounded when another protester fired on a car as it drove through a crowd of demonstrators on Interstate 225 in the Denver suburb of Aurora on Saturday.

Police said a protester fired a weapon at the car, but missed and struck at least one person who was taken to a hospital in stable condition.

Initial reports stated two people were shot.

Photo may have been deleted

The protesters were trying to draw attention to the death of Elijah McClain, a Black man who was stopped by police after a 911 caller reported him as suspicious in August 2019.

McClain fell unconscious after a cop placed him in a chokehold and a paramedic injected him with 500 milligrams of the sedative ketamine. He was later declared brain dead and taken off life support.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images

Porsha Williams is cooling her heels in a Louisville jail cell. Williams was arrested while protesting the murder of Breonna Taylor by Louisville police officers in March.

The Real Housewives of Atlanta TV personality joined other protesters outside the home of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron in Louisville to demand justice for Breonna.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook.com

Taylor, an emergency medical worker, was fatally shot multiple times in her own home during a bungled drug raid by three plainclothes police officers.

One officer has since been fired, but protesters say that's not enough. They won't rest until all three officers are let go.

Paras Griffin/Getty Images

According to Williams' fiance Dennis McKinley, the reality TV star and mom-of-one was arrested alongside Women's March co-organizer Tamika D. Mallory, rapper Trae tha Truth, and Love & Hip Hop co-creator and star Yandy Smith, among others.

Photo supplied by WENN.com

Fans and friends admired Porsha's courage and willingness to give her freedom for what she believes in.

"She has always been fearless. You mess with her people, you mess with her," her sister Lauren Williams wrote on Instagram. "She takes the case of #breonnataylor personally and she's sacrificing work, time with her loved ones, and her comfort to make sure the offenders are held accountable for their actions.

"This is her passion, this is her purpose. God please protect them," she added.

Photo may have been deleted

Facebook.com

A registered behavioral health technician for Centria Healthcare in Saginaw, Michigan was fired Thursday after Internet sleuths "canceled" him for making disparaging remarks about Breonna Taylor.

Benjamin Holthaus is the latest casualty of social media's "cancel culture.” Internet sleuths tracked him down and doxxed him after he wrote an offensive post saying Taylor was not an emergency medical technician and accused her of being "deep in the drug game".

Taylor was shot multiple times in her bed by three plainclothes officers who executed a no-knock warrant at her home in the early morning hours. They were searching for a drug suspect who was already in police custody.

One of the officers was fired but the other two are still on active duty.

Instagram blogger @GossipoftheCity doxxed Holthaus (published his employee's name and phone number) and urged her followers to contact his employer, Centria Autism, who confirmed Holthuas was no longer employed there on Thursday.

"Thank you for sharing this information with us as that type of behavior does not align with our mission or values.

We were informed of this post last week and we have confirmed with our HR Department that this individual is not a current employee. We have requested removal of their association with our organization on social media through each platform."

 

Photo may have been deleted

One of the police officers involved in Breonna Taylor's shooting death was fired for "blindly" firing 10 rounds into her apartment.

On Friday, the Louisville Metro Police Department announced the termination of Officer Brett Hankison for displaying "an extreme indifference to the value of human life" when he "wantonly and blindly" opened fire inside Taylor's apartment on March 13, while executing a no-knock warrant in search of a drug dealer who was already in custody.

"You used deadly force by blindly firing ten rounds into Breonna Taylor's apartment without supporting facts that your deadly force was directed at a person (who) posed an immediate threat of danger or serious injury to yourself or others," police chief Robert Schroeder said in a letter advising Hankison of his termination.

“In fact, the ten rounds you fired were into a patio door and window which were covered with material that completely prevented you from verifying any person as an immediate threat or more importantly any innocent persons present," the chief wrote.

"I find your conduct a shock to the conscience. I am alarmed and stunned you used deadly force in this fashion,” the chief added.

The LMPD shared the letter on Twitter.com on Friday.

Taylor, 26, and her boyfriend Kenneth Walker, 27 were asleep in bed when three officers broke down their front door.

Walker grabbed his firearm and shot at the officers, believing they were home invaders. Taylor was shot eight times in the ensuing chaos.

"Somebody kicked in the door and shot my girlfriend," a distraught Walker said in a 911 call.

Walker was not injured in the shootout but he was arrested and charged with attempted murder. All charges against him were later dropped and he was released.

Two other officers who discharged their weapons -- Sgt. Jon Mattingly and Det. Myles Cosgrove -- are still on the police force.

No arrests were announced.

Photo may have been deleted

Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Jennifer Lawrence is using her considerable star power to call for justice for Breonna Taylor, the Kentucky woman who was fatally shot in her bed by police officers in Louisville, KY.

Lawrence created a new Twitter account to call for the police officers who killed Taylor to be brought to justice.

Breonna, 26, was fatally shot multiple times in her own home in March after officers entered her house with a no-knock warrant, searching for a suspect who was already in custody.

The three cops allegedly involved have not been charged or suspended.

In only her second post on a new Twitter profile created this month, Jennifer wrote, "#SayHerName #BreonnaTaylor," above a powerful statement demanding Kentucky's Attorney General Daniel Cameron hold them accountable.

"For three months since her murder Breonna Taylor's family, the people of Louisville, Americans across the country, and many around the world have called out for justice," she said in a statement. "And yet, those calls have gone unanswered. No arrests have been made, the officers responsible for her death remain employed by the LMPD (Louisville Metro Police Department), and disturbingly, the LMPD's own investigation report was woefully inaccurate."

The 'Hunger Games' actress also condemned the "erasure" of black women, stating that it could not "continue in America."

She was likely referring to the fact that Black women are raped or killed with barely any attention given to their stories.

Photo may have been deleted

A lawsuit has been filed against the Louisville Metro Police Department after a Black woman was killed by three white officers who forced their way into her home.

Breonna Taylor, an EMT employee, was fatally shot in the early morning hours of March 13 when officers forced their way inside and "blindly fired" after they were met by gunfire inside the home.

Taylor, 26, was asleep in bed with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, who heard a commotion and went to investigate around 12:30 a.m.

The officers were at the wrong house, serving a warrant on a suspect who lived across town and was already in custody.

The cops breached the front door "without knocking and without announcing themselves as police officers," according to the suit filed by Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, who is being represented by attorney Benjamin Crump.

"The defendants then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life," the lawsuit alleges. "Shots were blindly fired by the officers all throughout Breonna's home."

Taylor was shot eight times and died in her bed. Walker, 27, was not hit. He was arrested and charged with assault and attempted murder on a police officer.

The lawsuit states Walker had a license to carry and kept firearms in the home for protection.

Crump is also representing the father of Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black male who was shot and killed by 2 white men in Brunswick, Ga. on Feb. 23.

Crump called out the police department for not taking responsibility for the way their officers serve no-knock warrants.

"We stand with the family of this young woman in demanding answers from the Louisville Police Department," he said in a statement on Twitter.

A spokesman for the Louisville police said, "Due to an ongoing internal investigation into this situation, we are not able to comment at this time."