Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Brett Favre allegedly raided his own charitable foundation to fund an athletic club at his alma mater in Mississippi.

The former Packers quarterback is accused of receiving $5 million in welfare funds to build a new volleyball gym for his daughter at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Court documents show he's being accused of plundering his own charity for needy kids to finance the U. of Southern Mississippi's athletic club.

According to the Daily Beast, Favre took $130,000 in donations made to his nonprofit for "disadvantaged children" and funneled the cash to the athletic club.

According to court documents, Favre allegedly persuaded Nancy News, the owner of a nonprofit educational center, to donate millions in federal money to a biotech firm Prevacus and a corporate affiliate, of which Favre was a major backer.

Favre also received $1.1 million from the center for speeches he never gave.

Favre repaid the speaking fees, but he still owes $228,000 in interest, according to Yahoo! News.

Favre, 52, is caught in the largest public funds corruption scandal in Mississippi history. Six officials were arrested in February and charged with misspending $77 million in public funds.

Three people have already pled guilty, including Nancy New and John Davis, the former director of a welfare agency. Davis was sentenced to 32 years in prison on the state charges.

Davis is currently on house arrest awaiting his federal sentencing on Feb. 2, 2023. He faces a maximum of 15 years in prison on the fed charges.

Nancy New and her son Zachary New pled guilty to federal and state charges and are awaiting sentencing.

Favre has not been charged in the welfare scandal.

Photo may have been deleted

Getty Images

Brett Favre reportedly asked for welfare money to help recruit Deion Sanders' son, Shedeur, to his alma mater in 2019.

The retired NFL quarterback is under fire for receiving $5 million in welfare funds to build a volleyball court for his daughter at the University of Southern Mississippi in 2017.

According to text messages in court documents, Favre asked former governor Phil Bryant for more money to recruit Shedeur Sanders to the school.

"I need your influence somehow to get donations and or sponsorships," Favre texted Bryant. "Obviously Southern has no money so I'm hustling to get it raised."

The young quarterback eventually signed with Jackson State after his famous father was named head coach there.

Mitchell Layton/Getty Images

Favre's attorneys say their client had no idea the money came from welfare funds. But text messages show Favre was informed of the source of the money multiple times.

In other text messages, Favre directly referred to the 2017 funding for his daughter's volleyball court, which came from a fund for needy families that was misappropriated by Nancy New through her nonprofit.

"I want you to know how much I love Nancy New and John Davis," Favre texted. "What they have done for me and Southern Miss is amazing."

Nancy New, her son, Zachary, and John Davis, former director of Mississippi's welfare agency, all pled guilty to misspending government funds. Davis was sentenced to 32 years in prison last week.

New and her son are awaiting sentencing.

Favre and Bryant have not been charged.

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

ESPN has suspended Brett Favre programming as public backlash over his welfare scandal intensifies.

ESPN suspended "The Brett Favre Show" podcast, the network confirmed to CBS MoneyWatch.

SiriusXM also paused Favre's weekly radio show, as calls grow to indict the former Packers quarterback for allegedly stealing public funds.
 
RELATED: ESPN: Brett Favre Pressed for Welfare Money After Being Warned of Illegality
 
The Hall of Famer is accused of using Mississippi state's welfare funds as his own personal piggy bank to build a volleyball stadium for his daughter back in 2017.

Favre, 52, also asked for an additional $1.8 million to $2 million to build an indoor practice facility for the University of Southern Mississippi's football team.

"We are not taking No for an answer!" Favre wrote in a text message to then-Gov. Phil Bryant on Sept. 4, 2019.

Bryant responded, "We are going to get there. This was a great meeting. But we have to follow the law. I am to[o] old for Federal Prison."

Favre faces a civil lawsuit as state officials seek to recoup part of $20 million he allegedly received in misspent welfare funds.

The lawsuit alleges that Favre, former WWE star Ted DiBiase and others "squandered" more than $20 million intended for welfare recipients.

Mississippi auditor Shad White found that state officials used a nonprofit organization to pay Favre $1.1 million for speeches that he never gave.

In an October 2021 Facebook post, Favre claimed he started repaying the money to the state. He also said he didn't know the money came from a welfare fund.

Favre's attorneys insist he did nothing wrong.

Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

Brett Favre reportedly requested welfare money to build a football facility at his alma mater in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

Favre, 52, faces a civil lawsuit as state officials seek to recoup more than $20 million he allegedly received in misspent welfare funds.

Favre's radio show "The SiriusXM Blitz With Brett Favre and Bruce Murray" on SiriusXM Radio was placed on hiatus amid the welfare fraud scandal, according to Fox News.

Mitchell Layton/Getty Images

The retired Packers quarterback faces public scrutiny after he received $5 million in welfare funds to build a volleyball stadium for his daughter at the University of Southern Mississippi in 2017.

According to court documents, Favre also requested millions more in welfare funds to build an indoor practice facility for the University of Southern Mississippi's football team.

Favre requested the funds on July 28, 2019, as he unsuccessfully tried to recruit the son of retired NFL star, Deion Sanders, to the university.

On Sept. 4, 2019, Favre sent a text message to then-Gov. Phil Bryant pressing for an additional $1.8 million to $2 million in funding for the football facility. "We are not taking No for an answer!" Favre wrote.

Bryant responded, "We are going to get there. This was a great meeting. But we have to follow the law. I am to[o] old for Federal Prison."

Favre and Bryant are alumni of the university.

Text messages included in a court filing show Favre possibly knew the funds were intended for welfare recipients in Mississippi.

Favre's attorneys claim he wasn't aware that the Mississippi Department of Human Services was the source of the funds.

Six people were arrested in February 2020 for their roles in the theft of $77 million in welfare funds. Several defendants have already pled guilty, including John Davis, former director of Mississippi's welfare agency.

Davis pleaded guilty Thursday to multiple federal and state charges. He was sentenced to 32 years in prison.

Favre and former Gov. Bryant have not been charged.

Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

Brett Favre allegedly pressed Mississippi state officials for welfare money even after being warned misspending state funds was illegal, according to ESPN.

Favre is caught in the middle of Mississippi's largest welfare scandal involving $77 million in misspent welfare funds.

Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

The retired NFL quarterback allegedly pressed former Gov. Phil Bryant and other state officials for $5 million in welfare money to build a volleyball stadium for his daughter at University of Southern Mississippi.

Favre and Bryant are alumni of the university.

Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Favre's daughter, Breleigh, pictured left with her parents in 2015, began playing volleyball at the university in 2017.
 
RELATED: Text Messages Reveal Brett Favre's Involvement in Massive Welfare Fraud
 
According to a court filing, Favre was warned by then-Gov. Phil Bryant that the misuse of state welfare funds was illegal.

Favre's attorneys claim he did not know the original source of the funds. However, text messages included in a court filing show he was told the funds were earmarked for welfare recipients.

Mitchell Layton/Getty Images

On July 28, 2019, Bryant texted Favre that the founder of a nonprofit "has some limited control over Federal Funds in the form of Grants for Children and adults in the Low Income Community."

"Use of these funds [is] tightly controlled," Bryant texted Favre, according to the filing. "Any improper use could result in violation of Federal Law. Auditors are currently reviewing the use of these funds."

In another text message to Nancy New, who ran the Mississippi Community Education Center, Bryant wrote, "Just left Brett Favre. Can we help him with his project. We should meet soon to see how I can make sure we keep your projects on course."

A text message from Favre to Nancy New shows he was concerned that the local media might find out about the welfare payment.

"No, we never have had that information publicized," Nancy New texted him back. "I understand you being uneasy about that though..."

In a follow-up text message to Favre the next day, New wrote:

"Wow, just got off the phone with Bryant! He is on board with us! We will get this done!"

A lawyer representing former Gov. Bryant, Billy Quin, told ESPN that Favre "continued to press for state funds, first from DHS and later in a legislative appropriation."

On Sept. 4, 2019, Favre sent a text message to Bryant pressing for an additional $1.8 million to $2 million in funding for the new facility. "We are not taking No for an answer!" he wrote.

Bryant responded, according to the court filing: "We are going to get there. This was a great meeting. But we have to follow the law. I am to[o] old for Federal Prison."

On April 27, 2020, Bryant texted then-Southern Miss president Rodney Bennett after Favre asked him to reach out to Bennett.

"Maybe he wants the state to pay off his [debts]," Bryant wrote. "Like all of us I like Brett. He is a legend but he has to understand what a pledge means. I have tried many time[s] to explain that to him."

Six people were arrested in February 2020, including John Davis, former director of Mississippi's welfare agency. Davis pleaded guilty Thursday to multiple federal and state charges, including five counts of conspiracy and 13 counts of fraud against the government.

Judge Adrienne Wooten sentenced Davis to 32 years in prison, and ordered him to pay restitution.

In April Nancy New and her son Zachary New pleaded guilty to state charges of misspending welfare funds on lavish gifts, including first-class airfare and a Chevy Yukon for Davis.

Nancy New is cooperating with prosecutors as part of her plea deal. She and her son are awaiting sentencing. They face 100 years in prison.

Favre and former Gov. Bryant have not been charged. Favre's attorneys continue to deny any wrongdoing.

Mitchell Layton/Getty Images

Text messages reveal retired NFL star Brett Favre's involvement in a massive welfare fraud case in Mississippi.

The former Packers quarterback is accused of accepting $5 million in welfare funds to build a volleyball stadium for his daughter at University of Southern Mississippi.

Kevin Mazur/WireImage

Favre is pictured in 2015 with his daughter, Breleigh, and wife, Deanna Favre.

The $5 million was part of $70 million in federal funds intended for the state's Temporary Assistance for Needy Families welfare program.

Favre, 52, has not been charged with a crime, but the pressure is mounting as critics accuse prosecutors of a cover up.enl

Text messages reveal Favre and former Gov. Phil Bryant's scheme to misuse the funds for a volleyball stadium.

"Just left Brett Favre. Can we help him with his project. We should meet soon to see how I can make sure we keep your projects on course," Bryant wrote in a text to Nancy New who ran the Mississippi Community Education Center with her son Zach New.

A text message from Favre shows he was concerned that the local media might find out about the secret payment.

"If you were to pay me is there anyway the media can find out where it came from and how much?" he asked.

Nancy New assured Favre that the media would be left in the dark.

"No, we never have had that information publicized. I understand you being uneasy about that though..."

In a follow-up message the next day, she wrote:

"Wow, just got off the phone with Bryant! He is on board with us! We will get this done!"

Nancy New and Zach New pled guilty to state charges of misusing public funds.

Favre and former Gov. Bryant have not been charged with any crimes. Favre's attorneys deny any wrongdoing.