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Michael Costello says Chrissy Teigen's online bullying left him depressed and suicidal.

Costello, 38, issued a statement accusing Teigen of spreading fake photos and racist rumors about him on social media in 2014.

The Fashion designer is best known for his appearance on the eighth season of Project Runway.

Costello's accusations came hours after Teigen apologized a second time for cyberbullying Courtney Stodden and others.

"I didn't want to do this, but I can not be happy until I speak my mind," he wrote in a lengthy post on Instagram.

"I need to heal and in order for me to do that I must reveal what I've been going through. I wanted to kill myself and I still am traumatized, depressed, and have thoughts of suicide."

He continued:

"When I reached out to Chrissy Teigen to communicate that I was the victim of a vindictive cyber slander and that everything she thought I was is not who I am, she told me that my career was over and that all my doors will be shut from there on."

Costello also shared screenshots of DMs he sent Teigen begging her to stop saying he called someone a racial slur.

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However, fashion designer Maxie James accused Costello of calling her a "Black ni**er b*tch" when they bumped into each other in a fabric store.

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James also admitted she nearly "whooped his a**" and almost went to jail.

"Whew one thing about that karma boy! it aaaaalways finds its way back around! even if it’s 7 years later! Michael Costello got the nerve to be playing victim of being bullied, but called his self bullying 7 years ago and called me a Black N****r B*** in a fabric store downtown. He had the wrong one tho cus I most certainly whooped his a** and almost went to jail too. Thank GOD for his mercy us I seriously LOST IT. I never experienced racism before. All I knew to do was FIGHT."

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Pete Davidson dissed former model Chrissy Teigen on this weekend's Saturday Night Live episode.

"If there's one good thing about the pandemic besides getting Chrissy Teigen out of our lives...," said Davidson, 27.

Chrissy Teigen, 35, lost major retail sponsors amid reports that she bullied Courtney Stodden and others online.

Bloomingdales pulled out of a deal with Teigen last week after she was accused of telling the then-16-year-old model to kill herself in private Twitter messages.

"(Chrissy) wouldn't just publicly tweet about wanting me to take 'a dirt nap' but would privately DM me and tell me to kill myself," Stodden said. "Things like, 'I can't wait for you to die'."

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Bloomingdale's is owned by the same parent company as Macy's, which pulled Teigen's cookware line earlier this week. Target and Walmart also dropped Teigen's cookware from their websites.

Teigen came under fire for allegedly sending toxic direct messages to teenagers on Twitter.com.

Davidson and many others are relieved Teigen is finally canceled -- this time for good.
 

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'90s sitcom star Jaleel White reflected on "cancel culture" and the impact Bill Cosby made on his career, despite Cosby's behavior that sent him to prison.

Jaleel, 44, described Mr. Cosby as a mentor to former child stars like himself whose lives were positively affected by the legendary actor.

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"I don't have a dog in the fight at all when it comes to Mr. Cosby," Jaleel told "Daily Blast Live" co-hosts Jeff Schroeder, Al Jackson and Sam Schacher.

The "Family Matters" star says he doesn't condone the actions that led Bill Cosby to prison, but he does acknowledge the impact Cosby made on his career when he was young.

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"I will say that when I was young, he was a mentor to me, and he had a very big impact on my representation at a particular point in my life. So, it's tough for people like myself, like Raven-Symoné, or the children who grew up on that show ['The Cosby Show'] who are now full grown adults, Keshia [Knight Pulliam], Malcolm [Malcolm-Jamal Warner], and even myself who, our childhoods were affected by this man."

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"Cancel culture says 'you will not talk about him, you will not address him, you will not even discuss the impact that he had on you,'" said Jaleel, pictured with his 12-year-old daughter, Samaya White.

"That's not fair to us at all. That's not fair to the legacies that we have. I always just like to put it in a proper context, when I talk about Mr. Cosby, I am not condoning his actions at all, but there are other stories to be told about how Mr. Cosby affected a lot of people's lives."

Watch the interview below:
 

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Chrissy Teigen has lost another retail sponsor amid reports that she bullied Courtney Stodden and others online.

Bloomingdales pulled out of a deal with Teigen after she was accused of telling the then-16-year-old model to kill herself in private Twitter messages.

An insider explained why the luxury department store chain Bloomingdales dropped out of signing a contract with Chrissy.

"They pretty much had it together... but had to cancel it," the source told Page Six.

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26-year-old Courtney said Chrissy sent hateful messages on social media, both publicly and privately, when the model and Internet personality shot to fame in 2011 after marrying The Green Mile star Doug Hutchison.

"(Chrissy) wouldn't just publicly tweet about wanting me to take 'a dirt nap' but would privately DM me and tell me to kill myself," Stodden said. "Things like, 'I can't wait for you to die'."

Chrissy did not deny the claims and instead apologized profusely, saying she feels "lucky" to be "held accountable" for her past trolling behavior.

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"I'm mortified and sad at who I used to be," she said. "I was an insecure, attention seeking troll. I am ashamed and completely embarrassed at my behavior but that... is nothing compared to how I made Courtney feel... These were not my only mistakes and surely won’t be my last as hard as I try but god I will try!!"

Target, Walmart and Macy's have also dropped the scandal-plagued former model's cookware line.

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"The Breakfast Club" co-host Rashawn "DJ Envy" Casey is under attack for comments he made regarding the fatal shooting of 16-year-old Ma'Khia Bryant.

Ma'Khia was gunned down by a Columbus, Ohio police officer on April 20 when she attempted to stab a woman during a fight over an unmade bed at a foster group home.

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Facbook

DJ Envy chose the side of reason and facts during a debate with co-host Charlamagne the god, who allowed anger to rule his emotions.

After the show, Black Twitter went into a frenzy, attacking DJ Envy and calling him a sellout.

"I understand people are upset and they have the right to be — but what I don't like is this cancel culture, when they try to cancel somebody for an opinion," DJ Envy tells Page Six.

"It doesn't hurt me ... because people are mad about what's going on and I'm mad and upset as well. But I know who's on my side and who's not. I know who tries to help the community and who doesn't. We sit here and raise money every year for organizations that fight against this. I help our community with financial freedom and learning about buying their own homes, and their own investment properties. So people can have financial freedom so they can use their own money."

"Every case is different," Envy told Page Six. "And in this case, if I pull up to a scene and see a girl chasing another girl about to stab a girl, my job as a police officer is to make sure that girl doesn't get killed. And the law allows me to stop that killing or that stabbing by any means necessary. That's what the law allows me to do, on both sides.

"The whole situation is tragic and it's sad because that system failed that young lady. The fact that she's out there fighting at 16 with a grown woman. The fact that the older man seen in the video would rather kick the girl on the ground and join the fight instead of stopping the fight, all these things come together and the system failed that girl and it is sad."

He added, "Everybody's saying [the police] shoot first, but he possibly saved that [other girl's] life ... if she would've stabbed her who knows if she would've lived. She could have got cut in the throat, in the face, we just don’t know what could happen."

DJ Envy is the son of a retired NYPD cop, and a victim of police harassment. He said he "has experienced with both sides of the spectrum."

Watch video of DJ Envy and Charlamagne's debate below.
 

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Alexi McCammond stepped down as editor of Teen Vogue after racist and homophobic tweets resurfaced from a decade ago.

McCammond, who was 17 when she wrote the tweets, apologized profusely after the internet recirculated the old tweets earlier this month.

The tweets included comments about the appearance of Asian features, derogatory stereotypes about Asians and LGBT+ slurs.

Screenshots of the old tweets were recirculated after Condé Nast announced her new gig at the helm of Teen Vogue on March 5.

As the outrage ensued on social media, Ulta Beauty and Burt's Bees, major advertisers with Teen Vogue, suspended their campaigns with the publication.

One social media user wrote:

"I was happy to see a young, black, woman successful in a space that was NOT ALLOWED in my day but after reading her racist, comments... I am DONE! Sadly, she always seemed a little too cocky and now a racist, too!!!"

But others were willing to give McCammond another chance.

One Instagram user wrote:

"How is our culture supposed to evolve if we can't forgive? She said these things when she was 17. Everyone here judging is secretly happy that they didn't have Twitter when they were ignorant teenagers."

Another user wrote:

"Wait that's it? She basically only states that asian people exist and are not without fault. This, when tweeted at 17, is supposed to ruin someone's career? Are you for fucking real? She's not the problem, you are."

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A former youth pastor who called a girls basketball team the N-word for kneeling during the National Anthem has been dropped by four sponsors.

The incident happened last week during a high school state basketball quarterfinals championship game between undefeated Norman High School and Midwest City in Oklahoma.

"They're kneeling? F*** them," said Matt Rowan who announced the game for the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association. "I hope Norman gets their ass kicked," he said.

Seconds later, Rowan, who believed his microphone was turned off, said, "Did they even salute the flag?" "F***ing ni**ers."

Norman's basketball coach shared the audio clip on Twitter on Friday: "Hey @NFHSNetwork looks like you forgot to cut the Mic!!! 'F****** N******' is the one that really got me!! Tell us how you really feel!! THIS IS WHY THEY KNEEL!!!"

Following the public backlash, Rowan released a statement blaming his inappropriate language on a spike in his high blood sugar level:

"I will state that I suffer Type I Diabetes and during the game my sugar was spiking," he wrote. "While not excusing my remarks, it is not unusual when my sugar spikes that I become disoriented and often say things that are not appropriate as well as hurtful."

Racism is not a known symptom of diabetes type 1 or 2.

Rowan's statement only infuriated the cancel culture who flooded the social media accounts of his sponsors.

Rowan owns American Lock Shop and OSPN in Tahlequah, OK. His sponsors include Fastenal, ALL Designs, X-Press Stop and Chris Pruitt Auto Sales. All four companies announced they were ending their partnerships with Rowan over the weekend.

Fastenal, a wholesale distributor of construction supplies, tweeted on Friday: "We do not support this type of behavior and have officially severed ties with Matt Rowan and OSPN Live."

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After canceling Dr. Seuss, the classic cartoon character Pepé Le Pew's head is next on the chopping block.

The Looney Tunes character was dropped from the live animation sequel Space Jam: A New Legacy, starring LeBron James.

In one scene, Pepe, the bartender, flirts with Greice Santo's character by kissing her arm which she rejects with an open handed slap.

Pepe then tells James and Bugs Bunny that Penelope Pussycat filed a restraining order against him. James responds that the skunk can't go around kissing other cartoon characters without their consent.

Deadline states Santo was "upset" over the removal of the scene, according to her spokesperson.

"This was such a big deal for Greice to be in this movie. Even though Pepe is a cartoon character, if anyone was going to slap a sexual harasser like him, Greice wished it would be her," said the spokesperson. "Now the scene is cut, and she doesn't have that power to influence the world through younger generations who'll be watching Space Jam 2, to let younger girls and younger boys know that Pepe’s behavior is unacceptable,” the statement read."

Deadline.com reports that the French skunk's scenes were cut after director Malcolm D. Lee took over from the movie's first director Terence Nance.

Lee desexualized curvaceous Looney Tunes cartoon character Lola Bunny whose curves dominated scenes in the original Space Jam starring the g.o.a.t Michael Jordan.

Charles Blow, a columnist for the New York Times, complained on Twitter that Pepe was too overly amorous in old cartoons. He said Pepe "normalized rape culture" and convinced boys that "no doesn't mean no."

Blow shared an old cartoon clip on Twitter of Pepe forcibly restraining and kissing Penelope.

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50 Cent's black card was revoked and he was unanimously canceled by Black Twitter after he endorsed his friend Donald Trump in the upcoming presidential election.

The fallout continues after the rap mogul announced he was voting for Trump due to challenger Joe Biden's insane tax plan.

Fiddy was outraged that Biden plans to hike the tax rate in New York to 62%.

"WHAT THE F***! (VOTE For TRUMP) IM OUT," Fiddy wrote on Instagram on Monday. He added: "I don't care Trump doesn't like black people 62% are you out of ya f****ing mind."
 

The reaction on social media was swift. Outraged L.A.-based Civil rights activist Najee Ali, director of Project Islamic Hope, canceled his Starz subscription and urged everyone to cancel their Starz subscriptions as well.

50 Cent is executive producer of the drama series "Power" on Starz.

Ali blamed Trump for the weakening coronavirus pandemic and called the president a "racist".

"Trump is a racist president who has never condemned white supremacy but embraced it," Ali wrote on his website. "For "50 Cent" to openly embrace a racist like Trump sends a horrible message. I refuse to support "50 Cent" or any celebrity whose endorsement of Trump is more important than the health and welfare of Black people."

Black Twitter also sounded off on 50 Cent and other Black notables who support Trump.

One Black Twitter user wrote: "Men like Kanye West, Ice Cube, and 50 Cent aren't Black leaders, they are nothing more than opportunistic puppets who would sell their own people into slavery for a profit."


Another user tweeted: "Liberals just 'revoked 50 Cent's 'black card.'"


And Larry Elder tweeted: "When it comes to taxes, it looks like 50 Cent pretty quickly figured out that he doesn't want to pay 50 percent. #Trump2020."

But Trump's son, Eric Trump, was pleased with the rapper's endorsement. He tweeted a photo of 50 Cent and fellow rapper Ice Cube sitting side-by-side wearing Trump caps. Eric called them "Two great, courageous, Americans!"

Twitter tagged Eric's tweet, "manipulated media."

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The "woke" cancel culture has come for the Black chef on the box of Cream of Wheat porridge mix.

B&G Foods, which owns Cream of Wheat, announced it will remove the iconic image of the Black chef from its packaging because the image of a Black chef is "racially insensitive".

The company became the latest "woke" corporation to drop a popular Black brand logo that they claim was stigmatized as a "racial stereotype" after the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

B&G Foods issued a statement explaining its decision.

"For years, the image of an African-American chef appeared on our Cream of Wheat packaging. While research indicates the image may be based upon an actual Chicago chef named Frank White, it reminds some consumers of earlier depictions they find offensive."

But some Blacks accuse corporations of intentionally using the civil unrest in the U.S. to remove the iconic images of Black people from their packaging.

Soon there will be no more iconic Black images left in advertising. And some Black activists believe that's by design.