Santiago Felipe/Getty Images

Talib Kweli is suing Jezebel magazine for publishing an article about his preference for light-skinned women.

Jezebel published the article after the legendary rapper was kicked off Twitter for harassing Black women in August 2020.

Twitter banned Kweli he and his fans harassed a Black Twitter user named Maya A. Moody who accused Black rappers of colorism in their dating choices.

Jemal Countess/WireImage

Kweli was offended that he was grouped with other rappers who prefer light-skinned women.

"Are we talking all of my relationships?" he asked Moody in a tweet in July 2020.

"My children's mother as well? I mean, is any of this really your business?" he wrote before launching into an hours-long attack on Moody.

The following month, Jezebel magazine published an article titled, "Talib Kweli's Harassment Campaign Shows How Unprotected Black Women Are Online and Off."

Kweli claimed the article cost him $1M in revenue, and lost bookings.

Johnny Nunez/WireImage

Kweli's wife, DJ EQ, filed for divorce months after Moody tagged her in her tweets to Kweli.

On Monday, August 8, Kweli filed a defamation lawsuit in the New York Supreme Court against G/O Media and writer Ashley Reese claiming emotional distress and partial financial ruin.

According to court documents, "The defendant negligently breached that duty by taking all the facts that the plaintiff stated and publishing them on the articles for 11 million plus to witness as they tried every [angle] to prove his facts were false, then attacked everything about his career, life, age, family."

The court documents continued: "The magazine took advantage of Talib and used him as a guinea pig to clarify how Black men treat Black women. Meanwhile, the plaintiff never harassed anyone; he was defending himself and his family."

Kweli included his single "Brown Skin Lady" which suggests American Black males are "conditioned" to prefer light-skinned women with straight hair that curls loosely when wet.

Kweli is seeking $300,000 in damages plus legal fees.
 

Todd Williamson/Getty Images

Keke Palmer (L) dismissed comparisons to fellow actress Zendaya Coleman, who many believe is paid more than Palmer because of her skin color.

Palmer responded after a tweet comparing the "Nope" star to Zendaya went viral over the weekend.

The tweet read:

"I'd like someone to do a deep-drive on the similarities and differences between Keke Palmer and Zendaya's careers. This may be one of the clearest examples of how colorism plays out in Hollywood. They were both child-stars, but their mainstream popularity is very different."

Palmer is Black, while Zendaya is biracial.

Bonnie Biess/Getty Images

Palmer, 28, whose movie "Nope" opened with $44 million at the box office, responded.

"A great example of colorism is to believe I can be compared to anyone. I'm the youngest talk show host ever. The first Black woman to star in her own show on Nickelodeon, & the youngest & first Black Cinderella on broadway. I'm an incomparable talent. Baby, THIS, is Keke Palmer."

She continued:

"I've been a leading lady since I was 11 years old. I have over 100+ credits, and currently starring in an original screenplay that's the number one film at the box office #NOPE. I've had a blessed career thus far, I couldn't ask for more but God continues to surprise me."

Palmer, who made her acting debut in Barbershop 2: Back in Business (2004), is also a singer/songwriter who has released 2 studio albums, three EPs, three mixtapes and 28 singles.

WENN.com

Zendaya, 25, who starred in 2021's "Spider-Man: No Way Home", did not respond to the controversy.

She became the youngest actress to win an Emmy for outstanding lead actress in a drama series in 2020 for her role in the TV series "Euphoria."

Photo may have been deleted

Screenshot

Rapper Gunna dropped his self-directed music video for his single "Banking On Me" off his third studio album, DS4Ever (Drip Season 4Ever).

The video's opening scene shows him with a beautiful Nubian woman in his Mercedes Benz outside a modest home in Houston.

He explains why she should give him time to miss her.

"I don't wanna get tired of you," he tells her.

"I love when I go out of town 'cause it give us a little time to come back to you. I be missing you... That's just how it go."

In the next scene he runs bath water for an exotic chick in a high-rise condo in New York City.

Photo may have been deleted

Screenshot

In other cities, he takes various LSLH women on shopping sprees for cars, jewelry, and high end bags, while paying the mortgage on their luxury homes.

Photo may have been deleted

Screenshot

At the end of the video, he returns to the Black woman. He is seen embracing her outside the starter home in Houston.

The video's message is clear. Men bank on themselves, not you.
 
Gunna - Banking On Me

SR rating: 2.5/5 roses
 

roses
 

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

Actress Thandie Newton broke down in tears while discussing the privilege and advantages she has over darker skinned actresses in Hollywood.

"I've wanted so desperately to apologize every day to darker skinned actresses, to say I'm sorry that I'm the one chosen," she said.

She said her "internalized prejudice" convinced her that she could play a dark-skinned woman on the big screen.

"I just thank God that my light skin didn't stop that from happening. I'm so, you know, that it didn't cause more pain," she said, while choking back tears.

Barry King/Getty Images

She added:

"My mama looks like you. It's been very painful to have women that look like my mum feel like I'm not representing them; that I'm taking from them — taking their men, taking their worth, taking their truth... We matter. I was worried about my light-skinnedness, because my light-skinnedness has been more problematic than being Black in my life, literally."

She continued: "I was BLACK in England — I mean dark-skinned. So then I went to America and I would describe myself as dark-skinned."

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

Thandie was surprised when Black Americans told her she was light-skinned, not Black.

"And suddenly I was someone that, you know, 'F**k you for being light-skinned.' I got more prejudice from Black people. I didn't understand. I literally didn't understand. I thought you're my brethren? What's happening?"

Watch the video below.
 

Photo may have been deleted

Warner Bros.

Lin-Manuel Miranda has apologized for not insisting on more Afro-Latino or dark-skinned actors in the movie adaptation of his 2008 Broadway musical hit 'In the Heights.'

In the Heights debuted on streaming site HBO Max and in theaters on Friday, June 11, but didn't have the blockbuster opening weekend that many had predicted.

In the Heights was expected to break box office records for a musical with opening weekend estimates of $25 million to $35 million.

However the woke musical was a crushing disappointment, coming in 2nd behind 'A Quiet Place 2' with just $11 million in box office receipts.

In the Heights carried a production budget of $55 million. $110 million gross is required to break even.

Photo may have been deleted

Warner Bros.

Some viewers criticized director Jon M. Chu and Miranda, who has a small part in the film, for being colorists.

Chu, who faced similar criticism for his film 'Crazy Rich Asians,' addressed the controversy by stating the 'colorism' debate was "a fair conversation to have".

Chu told The Root, "Listen, we're not going to get everything right in a movie. We tried our best on all fronts of it."

Miranda took to Twitter to address the "whitewashing" allegations with his followers on Monday.

"I hear that without sufficient dark-skinned Afro-Latino representation, the work feels extractive of the community we wanted so much to represent with pride and joy. I'm learning from the feedback, I thank you for raising it, and I'm listening."

Mexican actress Melissa Barrera, who plays Vanessa in the film, said the producers were looking for actors who fit the white Hispanic residents of the Washington Heights neighborhood.

"In the audition process, which was a long audition process, there were a lot of Afro-Latinos there. A lot of darker skinned people. And I think they were looking for just the right people for the roles. For the person that embodied each character in the fullest extent."

Barrera, best known for her role as Lyn in the Starz LGBT+ series Vida, added:

"Because the cast ended up being us, and because Washington Heights is a melting pot of black and Latinx people, Jon and Lin wanted the dancers and the big numbers to feel very truthful to what the community looks like."

In the Heights was delayed for a year due to the Covid outbreak.

Watch the movie trailer below.
 

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

Snoop Dogg's daughter, Cori Broadus, said her struggle with colorism and bullying led to a suicide attempt at age 13.

Cori, 21, said she suffered from depression and nearly took her own life after being called "fat and ugly" since she was a child.

"I grew up with two light skinned brothers... and I was the only chocolate one. I was overweight, I got lupus at six," she said.

"People used to always talk about me, 'You're fat, you're ugly, you're dark, you're this, you're that.' And I used to cry. At 13, I was ready to die. Just so sad, crying to my mom like, 'I'm so ugly, why did you have me? Why do I look like this? Why don't I look like my brothers?' It was just so many why, why, why's."

Robin L. Marshall/Getty Images

Cori said having wealthy parents and material things didn't lessen the pain she felt from being bullied about her body image disturbance issues.

"Just because you have money and just because you're able to do certain things that other people can't do, that doesn't mean you don't have a heart, a mind, a soul. I go through it just like everybody else. It don't matter cause my dad is rich, I drive a Toyota Corolla and I am content."

Mental health experts say most people who have suicidal thoughts do not go on to attempt suicide. But suicidal ideations are a risk factor for suicide.

Expressing suicidal thoughts publicly means they may already be in the planning stage, and intervention is necessary.

Axelle/Bauer-Griffin/FilmMagic

Cori, 2nd from left, is pictured with her father Snoop Dogg, her mom Shante Broadus, right, and brother Cordell Broadus, left, at the ceremony honoring Snoop Dogg with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on November 19, 2018 in Hollywood, California.

If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. A trained crisis worker is available 24/7.
 

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

When the comedy film "Coming To America" premiered in theaters in 1988, Black women everywhere expressed their dismay that Eddie Murphy's character, Prince Akeem had colorism issues.

At issue was Vanessa Bell Calloway's character, Imani, who was groomed by her father to be Akeem's obedient and subservient wife.

On the day they were to be married, Akeem ordered her to "bark like a dog" and "hop on one leg" in a humiliating and degrading manner.

Akeem and his loyal man servant traveled to New York to pick his queen, Lisa, an arrogant and self-entitled light skinned woman, not a dark-skinned, regal, beautiful African woman like his mother, the Queen.

Leon Bennett/Getty Images

In an interview with Page Six, Calloway confirmed suspicions that colorism issues played a role in her casting as Murphy's queen-to-be.

"When you have white people hiring Black people in movies, sometimes a certain look is wanted," said Calloway, who added that Murphy and the other executives "wanted a light-skinned girl" to play Lisa.

"I just wasn't light enough. Even though Eddie had the final say on who played Lisa."

Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

Murphy chose Shari Headley to play the part of Lisa McDowell.

"That's something that we've always dealt with within our race: A lot of men were indoctrinated by having a white woman or light-skinned woman on their arm," Calloway said. "I didn't want the part of Imani, I wanted to be Lisa -- I had read the script and I wanted the bigger role."

Black female moviegoers shared her frustration. They wrote letters to Murphy, the movie production company, and Ebony and Jet magazines, voicing their outrage over the optics of a stunningly beautiful African woman barking like a dog onscreen. While Lisa received $500,000 diamond and ruby earrings.

Calloway ultimately accepted the part despite her disappointment.

"The real deal is, when you're in a situation like that, you wanna be a part of an Eddie Murphy movie. I wasn't gonna say no! I would've loved to have had the lead part, but I was very happy to be in the movie. I can't lie about that. I said, 'I'll make the best out of this and I'll be the best.' It was a smaller role but it was a glamorous part to play. And Shari did a great job."
 

FayesVision/WENN.com

Franchell "Frenchie" Davis sparked debate on social media with a Facebook post calling out our obsession with colorism.

"Ya'll would never exalt and celebrate black women with dark skin and wide noses for being loud and opinionated and obnoxious, as needed," she wrote. "Not the way y'all exalt the Angela Rye's and Amanda Seales' of the world."

WENN/Avalon

"They get to be loud and outspoken and angry without being called bitter. And in these present times, I need the actual black women of lighter hue, who are beneficiaries of this f**k sh*t to do a better job at speaking out on and actively combatting it because I'm side eyeing everybody now."

FayesVision/WENN.com

Frenchie, 41, is best known as a popular contestant on the singing competition show American Idol in 2003.

She went on to perform in Rent on Broadway for 4 years and she was a contestant on the first season of The Voice.

Photo may have been deleted

Sheri Determan/WENN.com

Oscar winner Lupita Nyong'o has authored a new children's book loosely based on her own battle with colorism and dark skin.

The 12 Years a Slave actress grew up thinking light-skin was better, and now her book, Sulwe, helps dark skinned children to embrace the skin they are in. The 36-year-old Mexico-born beauty still struggles with her dark skin as an adult.

No photo

"When I was younger, I had trouble accepting my skin," she tells Good Morning America. "I grew up in Kenya around very many dark people, but I grew up with a lot of light skin on TV and in the books I read and it made me feel uncomfortable with my skin color.

"I had a younger sister that was born a lot lighter than me and she got cooed... and told how pretty she was, and I realized that it was in the omission of those words when it came to me that made me feel unworthy and so it took a while for me to find my stride and learn to love the skin I'm in.

"So I wrote this book to help little kids get there a little faster."

She adds, "Some of my favorite books when I was growing up were Cinderella and Thumbelina and Beauty & the Beast... and these were all women with light skin and blonde hair and so I thought that in order to make it into the pages of book, you have to be light.

"In fact, one of the first times I drew my family, I drew them with light skin... I wrote this to give dark-skinned kids a chance to live in a world of imagination and magic."

Apega/WENN.com

The Black Panther star previously said she didn't know she was Black until she arrived in America.

She believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

"As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black," she told BBC Newsnight.

She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

Sheri Determan/WENN.com

Lupita Nyong'o believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

The 36-year-old Pisces was born in Mexico but raised in Kenya, which gave her a different perspective on race and racism in Black America.

She tells BBC Newsnight that she still experienced "colorism" prejudice due to having darker skin. But it was only after she arrived in the U.S. that she saw how people were divided by race.

"Race is a very social construct, one that I didn't have to ascribe to on a daily basis growing up," she says. "As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black."

Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

Lupita says she was once told she was "too dark" to appear on TV, and that she was not as pretty as her sister, who had lighter skin.

"I definitely grew up feeling uncomfortable with my skin color because I felt like the world around me awarded lighter skin," the Black Panther star explains.

As a result, she believes Americans favor lighter skin even among those who are Black.

"We still ascribe to these notions of Eurocentric standards of beauty, that then effect how we see ourselves among ourselves," she adds.

Charlamagne bleaching

Can we finally agree that television and radio personality Charlamagne tha god has colorism issues?

Charlamagne's fans gasped when they saw his face on his MTV show this past weekend. Many viewers took to social media to discuss his shocking new appearance. But the vain radio star vehemently denies bleaching his skin.

Read more »

J Cole and Drake

Rapper J. Cole sparked controversy when he said President Obama wouldn't have been elected if his skin was dark.

In an interview with BET, Cole said 'colorism' brainwashes black people to see light skinned people as highly favored in the black community. As an example, Cole said President Obama's light skin helped him win the election in 2008.

"Barack Obama would not be President if he were dark skin," said Cole.

"That brainwashing that tells us that light skin is better, it’s subconsciously in us, whether we know it or not… still pursuing light skin women," said Cole.

Read more »