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Lin-Manuel Miranda has apologized for not insisting on more Afro-Latino or dark-skinned actors in the movie adaptation of his 2008 Broadway musical hit 'In the Heights.'

In the Heights debuted on streaming site HBO Max and in theaters on Friday, June 11, but didn't have the blockbuster opening weekend that many had predicted.

In the Heights was expected to break box office records for a musical with opening weekend estimates of $25 million to $35 million.

However the woke musical was a crushing disappointment, coming in 2nd behind 'A Quiet Place 2' with just $11 million in box office receipts.

In the Heights carried a production budget of $55 million. $110 million gross is required to break even.

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Some viewers criticized director Jon M. Chu and Miranda, who has a small part in the film, for being colorists.

Chu, who faced similar criticism for his film 'Crazy Rich Asians,' addressed the controversy by stating the 'colorism' debate was "a fair conversation to have".

Chu told The Root, "Listen, we're not going to get everything right in a movie. We tried our best on all fronts of it."

Miranda took to Twitter to address the "whitewashing" allegations with his followers on Monday.

"I hear that without sufficient dark-skinned Afro-Latino representation, the work feels extractive of the community we wanted so much to represent with pride and joy. I'm learning from the feedback, I thank you for raising it, and I'm listening."

Mexican actress Melissa Barrera, who plays Vanessa in the film, said the producers were looking for actors who fit the white Hispanic residents of the Washington Heights neighborhood.

"In the audition process, which was a long audition process, there were a lot of Afro-Latinos there. A lot of darker skinned people. And I think they were looking for just the right people for the roles. For the person that embodied each character in the fullest extent."

Barrera, best known for her role as Lyn in the Starz LGBT+ series Vida, added:

"Because the cast ended up being us, and because Washington Heights is a melting pot of black and Latinx people, Jon and Lin wanted the dancers and the big numbers to feel very truthful to what the community looks like."

In the Heights was delayed for a year due to the Covid outbreak.

Watch the movie trailer below.
 

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Snoop Dogg's daughter, Cori Broadus, said her struggle with colorism and bullying led to a suicide attempt at age 13.

Cori, 21, said she suffered from depression and nearly took her own life after being called "fat and ugly" since she was a child.

"I grew up with two light skinned brothers... and I was the only chocolate one. I was overweight, I got lupus at six," she said.

"People used to always talk about me, 'You're fat, you're ugly, you're dark, you're this, you're that.' And I used to cry. At 13, I was ready to die. Just so sad, crying to my mom like, 'I'm so ugly, why did you have me? Why do I look like this? Why don't I look like my brothers?' It was just so many why, why, why's."

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Cori said having wealthy parents and material things didn't lessen the pain she felt from being bullied about her body image disturbance issues.

"Just because you have money and just because you're able to do certain things that other people can't do, that doesn't mean you don't have a heart, a mind, a soul. I go through it just like everybody else. It don't matter cause my dad is rich, I drive a Toyota Corolla and I am content."

Mental health experts say most people who have suicidal thoughts do not go on to attempt suicide. But suicidal ideations are a risk factor for suicide.

Expressing suicidal thoughts publicly means they may already be in the planning stage, and intervention is necessary.

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Cori, 2nd from left, is pictured with her father Snoop Dogg, her mom Shante Broadus, right, and brother Cordell Broadus, left, at the ceremony honoring Snoop Dogg with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on November 19, 2018 in Hollywood, California.

If you are struggling with suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. A trained crisis worker is available 24/7.
 

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When the comedy film "Coming To America" premiered in theaters in 1988, Black women everywhere expressed their dismay that Eddie Murphy's character, Prince Akeem had colorism issues.

At issue was Vanessa Bell Calloway's character, Imani, who was groomed by her father to be Akeem's obedient and subservient wife.

On the day they were to be married, Akeem ordered her to "bark like a dog" and "hop on one leg" in a humiliating and degrading manner.

Akeem and his loyal man servant traveled to New York to pick his queen, Lisa, an arrogant and self-entitled light skinned woman, not a dark-skinned, regal, beautiful African woman like his mother, the Queen.

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In an interview with Page Six, Calloway confirmed suspicions that colorism issues played a role in her casting as Murphy's queen-to-be.

"When you have white people hiring Black people in movies, sometimes a certain look is wanted," said Calloway, who added that Murphy and the other executives "wanted a light-skinned girl" to play Lisa.

"I just wasn't light enough. Even though Eddie had the final say on who played Lisa."

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Murphy chose Shari Headley to play the part of Lisa McDowell.

"That's something that we've always dealt with within our race: A lot of men were indoctrinated by having a white woman or light-skinned woman on their arm," Calloway said. "I didn't want the part of Imani, I wanted to be Lisa -- I had read the script and I wanted the bigger role."

Black female moviegoers shared her frustration. They wrote letters to Murphy, the movie production company, and Ebony and Jet magazines, voicing their outrage over the optics of a stunningly beautiful African woman barking like a dog onscreen. While Lisa received $500,000 diamond and ruby earrings.

Calloway ultimately accepted the part despite her disappointment.

"The real deal is, when you're in a situation like that, you wanna be a part of an Eddie Murphy movie. I wasn't gonna say no! I would've loved to have had the lead part, but I was very happy to be in the movie. I can't lie about that. I said, 'I'll make the best out of this and I'll be the best.' It was a smaller role but it was a glamorous part to play. And Shari did a great job."
 

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Franchell "Frenchie" Davis sparked debate on social media with a Facebook post calling out our obsession with colorism.

"Ya'll would never exalt and celebrate black women with dark skin and wide noses for being loud and opinionated and obnoxious, as needed," she wrote. "Not the way y'all exalt the Angela Rye's and Amanda Seales' of the world."

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"They get to be loud and outspoken and angry without being called bitter. And in these present times, I need the actual black women of lighter hue, who are beneficiaries of this f**k sh*t to do a better job at speaking out on and actively combatting it because I'm side eyeing everybody now."

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Frenchie, 41, is best known as a popular contestant on the singing competition show American Idol in 2003.

She went on to perform in Rent on Broadway for 4 years and she was a contestant on the first season of The Voice.

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Oscar winner Lupita Nyong'o has authored a new children's book loosely based on her own battle with colorism and dark skin.

The 12 Years a Slave actress grew up thinking light-skin was better, and now her book, Sulwe, helps dark skinned children to embrace the skin they are in. The 36-year-old Mexico-born beauty still struggles with her dark skin as an adult.

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"When I was younger, I had trouble accepting my skin," she tells Good Morning America. "I grew up in Kenya around very many dark people, but I grew up with a lot of light skin on TV and in the books I read and it made me feel uncomfortable with my skin color.

"I had a younger sister that was born a lot lighter than me and she got cooed... and told how pretty she was, and I realized that it was in the omission of those words when it came to me that made me feel unworthy and so it took a while for me to find my stride and learn to love the skin I'm in.

"So I wrote this book to help little kids get there a little faster."

She adds, "Some of my favorite books when I was growing up were Cinderella and Thumbelina and Beauty & the Beast... and these were all women with light skin and blonde hair and so I thought that in order to make it into the pages of book, you have to be light.

"In fact, one of the first times I drew my family, I drew them with light skin... I wrote this to give dark-skinned kids a chance to live in a world of imagination and magic."

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The Black Panther star previously said she didn't know she was Black until she arrived in America.

She believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

"As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black," she told BBC Newsnight.

She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

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Lupita Nyong'o believes race is a "social construct" because, growing up in Kenya, she never thought of herself as "Black".

The 36-year-old Pisces was born in Mexico but raised in Kenya, which gave her a different perspective on race and racism in Black America.

She tells BBC Newsnight that she still experienced "colorism" prejudice due to having darker skin. But it was only after she arrived in the U.S. that she saw how people were divided by race.

"Race is a very social construct, one that I didn't have to ascribe to on a daily basis growing up," she says. "As much as I was experiencing colorism in Kenya, I wasn't aware that I belonged to a race called Black."

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She said she only realized she was Black when she moved to America, "because suddenly the term Black was being ascribed to me and it meant certain things that I was not accustomed to."

Lupita says she was once told she was "too dark" to appear on TV, and that she was not as pretty as her sister, who had lighter skin.

"I definitely grew up feeling uncomfortable with my skin color because I felt like the world around me awarded lighter skin," the Black Panther star explains.

As a result, she believes Americans favor lighter skin even among those who are Black.

"We still ascribe to these notions of Eurocentric standards of beauty, that then effect how we see ourselves among ourselves," she adds.

Charlamagne bleaching

Can we finally agree that television and radio personality Charlamagne tha god has colorism issues?

Charlamagne's fans gasped when they saw his face on his MTV show this past weekend. Many viewers took to social media to discuss his shocking new appearance. But the vain radio star vehemently denies bleaching his skin.

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