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Marvel Comics

Marvel Comics is set to unveil a new LGBT+ character as part of a five-part limited edition series titled The United States of Captain America.

The timing is intended to coincide with Pride Month in June, and the character featured in that month's intro story will be a teenage Captain America who is homosexual.

The plot will follow four popular previous Captain Americas (Steve Rogers, Sam Wilson, Bucky Barnes and John Walker) who go on a cross country journey to meet people who have made a difference in their communities.

One of the people they meet is Aaron Fischer, an openly LGBT+ teenager who dubs himself "Captain America of the Railways," and protects runaways and homeless people.

Marvel Comics is a subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, which is committed to increasing visibility of LGBT+ characters by 40 percent in 2021.

Fischer is depicted as a white male punk rocker with a mohawk haircut and tattoos. Black male teenagers as a consumer group don't read Marvel comics.

Fischer will debut in the main story of issue #1, written and illustrated by Aaron Trujillo and Jan Bazaldua.

"Aaron is inspired by heroes of the queer community: activists, leaders, and everyday folks pushing for a better life," Trujillo said in a Marvel press release. "He stands for the oppressed, and the forgotten. I hope his debut story resonates with readers, and helps inspire the next generation of heroes."

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YouTube/Marvel

Chris Pratt's 'Guardians of the Galaxy' character Star-Lord is now bisexual, Marvel Comics confirms.

Star-Lord is revealed to be both bisexual and polyamorous in a new Marvel comics issue titled "I Shall Make You a Star-Lord."

In the new comic, Peter Quill enters into a polyamorous relationship with male and female humanoids on a planet called Morinus. The trio are seen embracing while bathing together in a ceremonial temple.

"It's been over a decade," the superhero says to the two humanoids, per Entertainment Weekly. "Time to accept the truth... Morinus is my home. You're my home. Thanks for accepting me, guys."

Fans reacted to the news with a mix of shock and praise. "When did lord become bi???" wrote one fan on Twitter.com.

Another user tweeted: "Star lord has a big bi energy so I'm glad he's being confirmed."

It's unlikely that Pratt's character will reveal his bisexuality in a future Guardians of the Galaxy film.

Elliot Page, formerly Ellen Page, previously accused Pratt of attending an anti-LGBT+ church.

"Nothing could be further from the truth," the conservative Pratt said on his Instagram Stories in Feb. 2019. "I go to a church that opens their doors to absolutely everyone."

Marvel Studios is fulfilling a pledge to introduce new LGBT+ characters toward a goal of 40 percent LGBT+ characters in its future films.

An upcoming film titled The Eternals will include Marvel's first openly ghey character played by Brian Tyree Henry.

"We want the movies to reflect the audience and we want every member of our global audience to see themselves reflected on the screen," Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige told io9 in April 2019.

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The character Snoopy from Charles Schultz's comic strip Peanuts trended on Saturday after a tweet sent out from the @Snoopy account was misinterpreted as racist.

The tweet, that was meant to honor Black History Month, showed a picture of Charlie Brown and Franklin, the comic strip's first Black character. Charlie says to Franklin, "You're one of the good ones."

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The tweet sparked an uproar that has yet to subside. The @Snoopy account was quick to delete the tweet and issue an apology.

"Earlier today a tweet from this account, featuring an image of two friends, was misinterpreted. As this was not the intended message of the post, it has been deleted so as not to perpetuate an inaccurate interpretation. The post was meant as a celebration of friendship."

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HBO

Regina King is disappointed by fans criticizing her new HBO series "Watchmen" because it's nothing like the original comic book series.

The award-winning actress stars as a wife, a detective and a masked vigilante known as Sister Night who takes out her revenge on racists.

In the popular 12 issue DC Comics series, published from 1986 to 1987 and based in New York City, the non-traditional superheroes were depicted as everyday people with more than their share of anxieties and insecurities.

The iconic comic book inspired television shows, films and books. HBO's new series "Watchmen" picks up in 2019 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Viewers are disturbed over the fact that the series is so politicized and strays from the original comic book.

For example, the show opens with a reconstruction of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre - when a white mob attacked and killed hundreds of black residents in the Greenwood neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Adriana M. Barraza/WENN.com

Regina wants critics of the show to explain what makes them so uncomfortable about HBO's current political adaptation of the novel.

"With some people, I wonder if it's one of two things: were you truly a fan of the graphic novel? Because if you were, you'd realize there was a political story in there," King told Digital Spy. "And two, did it feel less political for you because you, as a white man right now, watching this, it's making you uncomfortable? Which one is it? A combination of both?"

Sheri Determan/WENN.com

Fearing that the series will be canceled, King urged viewers to "keep watching", explaining: "I would like for (viewers) to reserve their judgment until they get to the ninth episode. From there, then express what you feel. But please let your expression be truly what you feel.

"I won't be satisfied with an answer that says, 'I don't like it because it wasn't anything like the graphic novel.' That wasn't the intention," she added. "I need you to dig a little deeper to tell me what it was that made you feel uncomfortable. I feel that that's very fair... Now, tell me why you feel uncomfortable?"