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Daniel Kaluuya packed on over 20 pounds during the lockdowns in Los Angeles. The Academy Award-winning actor was joined by a friend who gave him motivation to exercise with a brisk walk through L.A.'s Griffith Park.

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Tennis star Naomi Osaka spent an afternoon with her sister and friends at the farmer's market at The Grove.

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Naomi drove to the store in her sky blue, all-electric Ford Bronco EV retro SUV.
 

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Nicole Murphy glanced over her shoulder at the paparazzi as she picked up lunch from Lemonade, in her brand new $100k+ Mercedes. She was spotted wearing sweatpants and a cropped jacket from Adidas. Nicole, 53, is an empty-nester after raising 5 children with her ex-husband Eddie Murphy, 60. She launched her own jewelry line called FLP by Nicole Murphy in 2009.

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British star Seal Samuel gave his youngest kids, son Johan, 14, and daughter Lou, 11, a big hug and kiss as he dropped them off at their grandmother's house in Los Angeles. The 58-year-old British singer also shares son Henry, 16, and stepdaughter Leni, 17, with his ex-wife, model Heidi Klum. Seal is best known for his biggest single "Kiss from a Rose."

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Actress Glenn Close insists her twerking to "Da Butt" during the 2021 Academy Awards on Sunday was not scripted.

The 73-year-old A-lister lost her eighth Oscar Award bid on Sunday night.

The actress, who was nominated this year for Hillbilly Elegy, was asked a trivia question by Lil Rel about previous movie songs.

Lil Rel asked guests if "Da Butt" was actually nominated for an Oscar or not.

Glenn correctly said the song was by EU and that it was written for the Spike Lee movie School Daze.

She stood up and twerked to the track, sending fans into a frenzy online.

Questions arose as to whether or not the scene was scripted.

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In a post on social media, Glenn confirmed that she knew about the question in advance. She said she received a little help from her friends: screenwriter Chris Terrio, Oscar winner Daniel Kaluuya and his pal Darrell Britt-Gibson.

"I knew that Lil Rel was going to quiz me about 'Da Butt' and all three guys helped me run through what I was to say," she explained. "Darrell insisted that I mention the Backyard Band, on top of E.U., Suga Bear and the whole DMV.

"I googled 'Da Butt' and watched Spike's music video so when Lil Rel asked if I could do the dance... you can actually see me think of the video," she said, while adding that her twerking was spontaneous.

"That part was completely spontaneous. Daniel, Darrell and Chris egged me on!!! It was ALL their fault.”

She concluded her post, "CONGRATULATIONS DANIEL on your BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR Oscar. You are completely brilliant. I now consider both Daniel and Darrell to be friends-for-life!"
 

 

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British actor Daniel Kaluuya won the best supporting actor Oscar for his role in biographical drama "Judas and the Black Messiah."

Like any good son, he thanked his parents in his acceptance speech: "You got to celebrate life, man! We're breathing, walking, it's incredible. It's incredible. Like, it's incredible. My mom met dad, they had sex. It's amazing."

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An ecstatic Daniel Kaluuya poses with Yuh-Jung Youn (left), winner of Best Actress in a Supporting Role for "Minari," and Frances McDormand, winner of Best Actress in a Leading Role for "Nomadland."

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This is the fourth Oscar win for McDormand, who won her first Oscar for her sensitive portrayal of a police chief in the dark comedy film Fargo (1996). Her trophy collection includes two Golden Globe Awards, three BAFTA Awards, two Emmy Awards, and a Tony Award.

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Angela Bassett stunned on the red carpet at the 93rd Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles on Sunday, April 25.

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Tyler Perry, winner of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, poses in the press room during the 93rd Annual Academy Awards.

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L-R) Tiara Thomas, H.E.R., and Dernst Emile II, winners of Best Original Song for "Fight For You" from "Judas and the Black Messiah," pose in the press room during the 93rd Annual Academy Awards at Union Station.

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Chloé Zhao becomes only the second woman to win Best Director in Academy Awards history. She took home the trophy for Nomadland.

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(L-R) Mia Neal, Jamika Wilson, and Sergio Lopez-Rivera pose backstage with the Oscar for Makeup and Hairstyling in the press room during the 93rd Annual Academy Awards

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(L-R): Andra Day, Tyler James Williams and Evan Ross embrace at the Spring Place's Oscars party honoring Andra Day and the cast of The United States vs. Billie Holiday.

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The 93rd Annual Academy Awards was broadcast live from Union Station in Los Angeles, California. Only 170 guests were invited as part of the audience. Hundreds of homeless people were cleared out of the area before the awards aired. They were threatened with jail time if they didn't leave.
 

See the partial list of winners below:

Best Picture:

Nomadland

Best Director:

Chloe Zhao, Nomadland

Best Actor:

Anthony Hopkins, The Father

Best Actress:

Frances McDormand, Nomadland

Best Supporting Actor:

Daniel Kaluuya, Judas and the Black Messiah

Best Supporting Actress:

Yuh-Jung Youn, Minari

Best Adapted Screenplay:

Florian Zeller and Christopher Hampton, The Father

Best Original Screenplay:

Emerald Fennell, Promising Young Woman

Best Animated Feature:

Soul

Best Costume Design:

Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

Best Film Editing:

Sound of Metal

Best Makeup and Hairstyling:

Ma Rainey's Black Bottom

Best Original Score:

Soul by Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, and Jon Batiste

Best Original Song:

"Fight For You" from Judas and the Black Messiah by H.E.R., Dernst Emile II, and Tiara Thomas

Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award:

Tyler Perry and the Motion Picture & Television Fund

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Photo: Universal Pictures

The NY Times contributor Carvell Wallace penned an emotional review of the new movie Queen & Slim, in theaters everywhere on Wednesday, Nov. 27.

Wallace, a Black father of two teenagers, urges moviegoers to give Queen & Slim a chance. He says they might be among "the great love stories of all time."

Queen & Slim is about a Black couple who meet on Tinder and go out to a Cleveland diner for their first date.

The man (Get Out star Daniel Kaluuya) is a minimum wage Costco cashier whose deep faith in God is reflected on his vanity license plate that reads: "TrustGod."

Queen (played by British newcomer Jodie Turner-Smith) is an uptight defense lawyer and atheist. The date is a disaster from the start. The only reason she went out with him, she says, is because he looked sad in his profile photo, and she felt sorry for him.

Queen has an attitude because one of her clients was sentenced to die on Ohio's death row.

"Was he innocent?" Slim asks. "Does it matter?" she snaps. "The state shouldn't decide who lives or dies."

The movie's flimsy plot line is based on that argument.

After dinner, Slim drives Queen home. On the way, his car is pulled over by an aggressive white cop.

Slim is polite and courteous at first. But Queen, the defense lawyer, knows her rights and just won't stop talking (the film's director, Melina Matsoukas, was "haunted" by the footage of Sandra Bland's arrest).

When Slim asks the cop to hurry it up because he's cold, the cop draws his weapon, because, you know, he fears for his life.

Queen reaches for her cell phone to record the encounter while Slim and the cop struggle over the gun. The gun discharges, grazing Queen on the thigh. Now fearing for his life, Slim kills the cop.

Slim wants to call his folks and turn himself in. He has a good case for self-defense. But Queen, the defense lawyer, decides to throw her law career away by ordering Slim to go on the lam with her.

Matsoukas, who directed Beyonce's music video "Lemonade", takes the couple on a meandering journey from the Midwest to the Deep South.

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Universal Pictures

Their first stop is the home of Queen's Uncle Earl in New Orleans. Uncle Earl (Bokeem Woodbine) is a war veteran and a pimp. Among his scantily clad hookers is Pose star Indya Moore, a cross-dresser who helps Queen remove her box braids so she will be less recognizable while on the run.

Of all the eccentric characters Queen & Slim encounter on their journey, Moore is the least memorable. Yet Wallace spends time describing the moments between the biological female Queen and the male-to-female trans Moore.

"The camera lingers on them in the intimate act of hairdressing; cool light fills the room. Queen breathes slowly, feeling protected for maybe the first time in the film."

It isn't hard to figure out where Wallace is going with this: Queen didn't feel protected when she was with Slim, a heterosexual male?

Wallace was physically and emotionally moved by Queen & Slim. After the film ended, he went into a bathroom for an ugly cry. "I put my sunglasses on because I was bawling, my whole torso heaving," he wrote.

Wallace goes overboard in his praise of the movie, over-exaggerating the "love story" between the two hapless fugitives.

Unlike the real Bonnie & Clyde, who were in a longterm relationship, Queen and Slim barely knew each other. They weren't even planning to go on a second date before the fateful encounter with the cop.

Their brief relationship is described by Wallace as "true, active, life-affirming love... He allows her anger, makes space for her hurt. Isn't this what love is?"

"If you allow it to be, Queen & Slim can be one of the great love stories of all time," Wallace writes.

If Queen & Slim is considered to be the standard for mature, life-affirming love, it is no wonder the divorce rate in America is over 70%.