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The school resource officer who arrested two minor children at an Orlando elementary school has been fired.

Officer Dennis L. Tuner was initially suspended from the Orlando Police Department after he arrested a 6-year-old girl for kicking another student at Lucious and Emma Nixon Academy Charter school on Thursday.

When the child was taken to the provincial's office, she screamed and kicked Officer Turner, who was the school's resource officer.

The child was handcuffed and taken to the Juvenile Assessment detention center where she was booked and had her mugshot taken. She was charged with battery on an officer of the law.

The 6-year-old's grandmother complained to the local news media that her granddaughter was arrested for "throwing a tantrum at school."

Meralyn Kirkland says her granddaughter was acting up in school because she was "sleep deprived."

She said when she told the officer her granddaughter had a sleep disorder, he replied, "Well, I have sleep apnea, and I don't behave like that."

When the story initially broke, Officer Turner was misidentified as a white officer - which furled the backlash on social media.

CBS News reports Turner, who was suspended after the incident, was fired on Monday.

At a press conference on Monday, Orlando Police Chief Orlando Rolón apologized to the children and their families.

He explained his decision to fire Turner in a post on the OPD Twitter page.

Later that day, Turner arrested an 8-year-old boy in a separate incident at the same elementary School.

Turner was fired after 23 years on the force.

Turner's supporters say he only "arrested" the children to teach them a lesson, but social media has an annoying habit of demonizing people with good intentions.

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NBA superstar LeBron James opened his first elementary school for at-risk students in his hometown of Akron, Ohio on Monday, July 30. "If we get to them early enough, we can hopefully keep them on the right track to a bigger and brighter future for themselves and their families,” the father-of-3 said at a press conference in the school's temporary building on Monday, July 30.

I Promise School

The school serves 240 of Akron's most academically challenged students. The students were chosen from a random pool of underachieving 3rd and 4th graders with the lowest marks on aptitude tests.

Akron's biggest success story missed 83 days of school in the 4th grade. LeBron's dream is to give the children something he never had growing up: a quality education and to know that someone cares.

“This school is so important to me because our vision is to create a place for the kids in Akron who need it most -- those that could fall through the cracks if we don’t do something,” he said.

The I Promise school is part of Akron Public Schools. The district paid $2.9 million out of its general fund for the landscaping, furniture, teacher's salaries, books, and other essentials. The LeBron James Family foundation pays for everything else, including 4 extra teachers to allow for smaller classrooms.

The school is housed in a temporary building owned by the district. The walls are lined with LeBron's game worn shoes and inspirational quotes by LeBron.

I Promise School principal Brandi Davis

LeBron tapped educator Brandi Davis to be the school's first principal. By 2022, the school will have 1,000 students in 1st through eighth grades.

The students, who began their first day on Monday, were given clothing, jackets, bicycles, helmets, as well as free breakfast, lunch and snacks. And a food pantry is set up in the school for children who don't have enough food at home.

Students who live over 2 miles away get free transportation to and from school.

If the students graduate, a college education awaits them at the University of Akron.

Education begins at home, so the students' parents are offered job placement and the opportunity to continue their education or earn their high school diplomas, ESPN reports.

“We want every kid who walks through this school to be inspired,” James told CNN. “To come away with something. Something where they can give back and it doesn’t matter -- it could be anything, but just for kids, in general, all they want to know is that someone cares. And when they walk through that door, I hope they know that someone cares.”

 

 

The kid from Akron with his kids from Akron. #IPROMISE #WeAreFamily

A post shared by I PROMISE School (@ipromiseschool) on

 

 

 

Photo by Jason Miller/Getty Images