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Offset is pleading with Internet trolls to leave his wife, Cardi B, and fellow rapper Lizzo alone. The Migos rapper begged trolls to stop harassing Cardi B and Lizzo and just let them "be great".

The Bronx rapper and Lizzo have faced severe backlash after releasing the new music video for their collaboration single "Rumors."

Lizzo was dragged for portraying herself as a goddess in the music video, which was tame by Lizzo's vulgar standards.

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Offset - who has been married to Cardi since 2017 -- told TMZ:

"Let these beautiful black women be great, stop judging. We work hard to be entertainers for the world. Let us be."

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Instagram/@lizzobeating

Lizzo recently broke down crying in a YouTube video, as she revealed she's received hateful comments from fat-shamers and "racists."

The R&B/pop star fought back tears as she said:

"I just feel like I'm seeing negativity directed towards me in the most weirdest way. People saying s**t about me that just doesn't even make sense.

"It's fat-phobic, and it's racist and it's hurtful. If you don't like my music, cool. If you don't like Rumors the song, cool."

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Instagram/@lizzobeating

The singer confessed to being shocked by the online hate:

"I make music that I like, that's important to me, and I make music that I hope helps people.

"I'm not making music for white people - I'm not making music for anybody. I'm a black woman making music. I make black music, period. I'm not serving anyone but myself. Everyone is invited to a Lizzo show, to a Lizzo song."

Facebook recently deleted comments and blocked dozens of Internet trolls. Facebook officials vowed to monitor Lizzo's timeline for more hate, which will be dealt with swiftly.

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Instagram

Facebook has deleted thousands of comments and banned trolls who taunted Lizzo's wight and made racist comments about her.

The "Truth Hurts" singer broke down and wept in a YouTube video after trolls hurled "fatphobic and racist" remarks about her new single "Rumors" featuring Cardi B.

YouTube users rated the single a flop and called Lizzo "mammy" because she portrayed a goddess in the music video.

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READ ALSO: Lizzo breaks down in tears (again) on YouTube
 
Wearing a stocking cap on her head and wiping tears from her eyes, Lizzo said:

"On the days that I should be the happiest, I just feel so down... I work so hard. I've been working triple time... doing 12 hours a day of promos and interviews... going to the studio with a f**king root canal...

"I'm putting so much love and energy into the world, and sometimes I feel like the world don't love me back."

The 33-year-old songbird returned to the Internet on Tuesday, after Facebook took action against her tormenters.

She thanked supporters for their positive energy and said it was "important" for her to express her anxiety and depression that day.

"We really need to check ourselves and how we treat people," she said.

"I'm not crying for me. Yeah, I'm successful, I'm happy, I strive for joy every single day. I'm balanced, I'm blessed. But I just be feeling for the world. This sh-t ain't right. We shouldn't talk to people like that. We shouldn't normalize treating people this way."

Following her mental breakdown, social media bosses removed thousands of nasty comments on Lizzo's Facebook and Instagram pages.

According to TMZ, Facebook officials banned the accounts of trolls from both social media sites.

They will continue to monitor Lizzo's timelines and remove toxic comments, so the fragile singer doesn't end up in a mental hospital.

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YouTube/ABC News

The White House claims just 12 social media accounts are responsible for 65% of Covid-19 mRNA vaccine misinformation online.

The White House based its opinion on an article by the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH).

After analyzing 812,000 anti-vaccine posts on Facebook and Twitter, the CCDH determined that just 12 people shared 65% of anti-vaccine posts.

Rizza Islam runs of the 12 accounts behind most online vaccine misinformation, according to the CCDH.

The other 12 accounts include Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Joseph Mercola, Dr. Sherri Tenpenny, Ty & Charlene Bollinger, and others.

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YouTube/EYL

Rizza Islam is described as a "religious zealot" and a "California based Scientologist with a large Instagram following."

Most of the 12 have been banned from other social media sites. The White House wants them banned on Facebook as well. But Facebook is hesitant to ban them because the 12 accounts have over 59 million followers between them.

Last Friday, Pres. Joe Biden accused Facebook of "killing people" by declining the White House's request to remove the 12 accounts for spreading conspiracy theories, hoaxes, and other misinformation.

In a press release over the weekend, Facebook responded by saying the White House was making Facebook a "scapegoat" because Biden missed his July 4 goal of 70% of Americans with at least one vaccine dose.

On Monday, Biden backtracked, saying that while he meant what he said about Facebook helping to spread misinformation, he didn't really mean Facebook was literally killing people.
 

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Twitter.com

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg expressed his concerns over the still experimental Covid-19 mRNA vaccines in a video leaked by Project Veritas.

Zuckerberg expressed concern that the mRNA vaccines may be modifying people's DNA.

Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) encodes proteins of Covid-19 which are inserted into human cells to stimulate the immune system to make antibodies.

A successful mRNA vaccine has never been approved for use in humans in history.

In the leaked video, Zuckerberg expressed his concerns about the "long-term side effects" of "basically modifying people's DNA and RNA" to fight Covid-19.

"I share some caution on this [vaccine] because we just don't know the long-term side effects of basically modifying people's DNA and RNA," Zuckerberg said in the leaked Zoom video.

But in a public video several months later, Zuckerberg repeated Dr. Anthony Fauci's claim that the vaccines do not modify DNA or RNA.

First of all, DNA is inherent in your own nucleus cell. Sticking in anything foreign will ultimately get cleared," said Fauci.

But Fauci doesn't clarify whether he is talking about the foreign mRNA in the Covid-19 vaccines.

Any discussion of the Covid-19 vaccines modifying DNA is banned from the Facebook platform.

Project Veritas founder James O’Keefe said that Zuckerberg imposes standards on his users that he does not live up to himself in private.

"Isn't it interesting that Zuckerberg can vacillate and evolve his thinking on the subject of vaccines. But as soon as he's made up his mind, or appears to have made up his mind on a topic, he disallows the almost 3 billion Facebook users to do the same?," said O’Keefe.

He added: "Rules for thee, but not for me."

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Getty Images

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced on Thursday, Jan 7., that Donald Trump is banned from Facebook indefinitely.

A statement from Zuckerberg reads, "We believe the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great. Therefore, we are extending the block we have placed on his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely and for at least the next two weeks until the peaceful transition of power is complete."

The news comes as Twitter restored Trump's account after suspending him for 12 hours when he pleaded with MAGA supporters to leave the U.S. Capitol.

Four protesters were killed during rioting, including Air Force veteran Ashli Babbitt, 37, who was shot in the face by a DC police officer when she and others forced their way through a locked door inside the Capitol building on Wednesday.

Trump is communicating with his followers via his official accounts on conservative platforms GAB and Parler.

Trump has promised an "orderly transition" of power after President-elect Joe Biden won the majority electoral college vote on January 6, 2021.

The outgoing President, who has repeatedly accused the Democrats of orchestrating a coup against him and stealing the November 2020 election, issued a statement on Thursday.

"Even though I totally disagree with the outcome of the election, and the facts bear me out, nevertheless there will be an orderly transition on January 20," Trump confirmed.

"I have always said we would continue our fight to ensure that only legal votes were counted. While this represents the end of the greatest first term in presidential history, it's only the beginning of our fight to Make America Great Again."

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A Duluth police sergeant's Facebook post about almost shooting an unarmed Black man went viral.

Sgt. Matt McShane, of Duluth, MN, shared his story on the Duluth Police Local 807 Facebook page last week.

McShane said he and other officers responded to shots fired between two vehicles and a pursuit of the suspect who may have been armed.

In his post, "I almost shot an unarmed Black man last night," McShane shared the thoughts that went through his mind as he approached the suspect.

"I level my pistol at him. I put my finger on the trigger. Is this it? Is he going to shoot us? Am I going to have to shoot this man to save myself and others? Will my wife wake up a widow, will my children no longer have their father? Is our community going to change forever because of me? Will everything burn only because we want to help? Because we want to live and not die?"

The reaction to McShane's first-person account of his split-second decision to live or die was widespread condemnation and outrage.

At first, Police Chief Mike Tusken praised McShane, but the post was later deleted and replaced with an apology.

"It was not my intention to cause further hurt and traumatize community members and I am deeply sorry my actions were insensitive and hurtful," McShane wrote.

Chief Tusken said he sympathized with his sergeant's message amid the aftermath of the George Floyd killing in Minnesota in May.

"Officers are experiencing disrespect and anger from community members who are frustrated at the institution of policing," he wrote. "I have witnessed more tears from officers this year than from all my years past."

But Duluth community organizer Jordon Moses, who is Black, was unsympathetic. He said the Duluth Police Department has a "culture of not wanting to dive deep on these issues."

"When communities and citizens push, institutions push back," said Moses. "We're supposed to be grateful the cop didn't pull the trigger? That's kind of your job. You have tools, you have training."

However, retired Minneapolis police officer and expert on police use of force Mylan Masson said McShane's message is "right on."

"We have to keep remembering police are human beings. They are going to make mistakes. They don't want to make mistakes," she said. "'What if I did shoot him?' That's a terrible thought."

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Shaun King fears for his life after he discovered a private Facebook group plotting to take him out.

The transracial activist says the private group is run by law enforcement officials who wrote comments discussing ways to kill him.

"A private Facebook group of law enforcement officers is literally plotting to kill me," King wrote in a post on Instagram on Thursday. "Sadly, I receive death threats daily."
 

The 40-year-old Kentucky native angered Christians when he called for protesters to tear down statues of "white" Jesus Christ and destroy stained glass windows and other images of Jesus and his "white" mother.

The transracial Caucasian activist, who claims to be a Black man, says historians believe Jesus likely had the appearance of people who typically lived in the Middle East rather than the white, bearded man depicted in the Holy Bible and other Christian literature.

"Yes, I think the statues of the white European they claim is Jesus should also come down. They are a form of white supremacy. Always have been."

He added: "In the Bible, when the family of Jesus wanted to hide, and blend in, guess where they went? EGYPT! Not Denmark. Tear them down."

King took to Twitter to complain that he received death threats after his anti-religion rant was not well-received.


 

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In an unexpected move, Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg sided with President Trump in his feud with Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey.

After Twitter fact-checked one of Trump's tweets about mail-in-ballots, Trump threatened to end Twitter's immunity from liability (lawsuits) by signing an executive order today.

Trump tweeted that mail-in ballots would be "substantially fraudulent." But Twitter's CEO Jack Dorsey fact-checked Trump's tweet, essentially moderating the president.

"Per our Civic Integrity policy, the tweets yesterday may mislead people into thinking they don't need to register to get a ballot (only registered voters receive ballots). We're updating the link on @realDonaldTrump's tweet to make this more clear," Dorsey tweeted.

Trump's executive order removing Twitter's status as a public forum will not only affect Twitter adversely, it will also affect Facebook and other social media platforms.

Twitter and Facebook are privately owned companies and can not be regulated by Trump. But Trump can remove their protections by changing their status from public forums to publishers.

Publishers such as bloggers, who edit and delete content, are vulnerable to lawsuits and do not receive special protections from liabilities as forums do.

That's why Zuckerberg slammed Twitter's CEO Jack Dorsey, saying Twitter should stop policing what Trump tweets.

"I don't think that Facebook or internet platforms in general should be arbiters of truth," Zuckerberg told "Squawk Box" co-host Andrew Ross Sorkin in an interview that aired Thursday morning. "Political speech is one of the most sensitive parts in a democracy, and people should be able to see what politicians say."

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dorsey responded to Zuckerberg on Friday, tweeting:

"This does not make us an 'arbiter of truth.' Our intention is to connect the dots of conflicting statements and show the information in dispute so people can judge for themselves."

Ari Fleischer, former White House Press Secretary for George W. Bush, said Dorsey was "incredibly stupid" to correct Trump's tweets. "Where does it end? He hasn't done that to the Iranian president. He hasn't done that to Chinese leaders. Why is he doing it?"

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A Louisiana police office lost his job after commenting "how unfortunate" the coronavirus didn't kill all Black people.

According to KLFY, former Kaplan officer Steven Aucoin was relieved of duty and terminated after he made the comment on Facebook during the governor's press conference on Friday.

One commenter posted, "Virus that was created to kill all the blacks is death." Aucoin responded, "Well it didn't work... how unfortunate."

Chief of police, Joshua Hardy, said Aucoin's behavior is not tolerated within the police department and Aucoin was fired after an investigation revealed he wrote the comment.

"We're held to a higher standard than the normal civilians, so you got to watch what you do, you got to watch what you say. You can't just go and post anything you want on social media," said Chief Hardy.

Fellow cops and Kaplan residents defended Aucoin, calling him a good cop and saying the screenshots were taken out of context.

But Chief Hardy was adamant that Aucoin was fired after a thorough investigation. "There were some comments that... was not suitable for a police officer to put up on Facebook," he said.

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A Black artist was forced to take his Facebook page private after he posted artwork that showed a young Black girl taking up a weapon against the two white males who killed Ahmaud Arbery.

Maurice Jackson created the artwork as part of his hip-hop ballerina series. The picture, posted on May 8, shows a young Black girl wearing a pink tutu with her natural hair in afro puffs. She is armed with a rifle and is facing down two Caucasian males wrapped in the confederate flag.

She is holding a photo of Arbery, who was killed by a former cop and his son in south Georgia on Feb. 23. The two men were arrested on Thursday and charged with felony murder and aggravated assault.

Jackson captioned the artwork: "*NEW ART* 'I THOUGHT THEY LOOKED SUSPICIOUS' #AuhmadArbery [sic] #RIP #hiphopballerinaseries."

The artwork earned praise from fellow artists and Jackson's supporters. But Black women unleashed their fury on him for portraying a minor child as the protector of Black males.

Art is supposed to be purely subjective. But the anger and bitterness expressed in the comments really reflects the frustration that many Black women feel toward Black men who abandoned them and their children for other men or women of other races.

When will Black women accept some responsibility for what Black males have become?

Most Black males were raised in homes where women were head of household. Only 33% of Black women who gave birth were married in 2019. It has been proven that Black women can't raise Black boys to be men.

It's time to do some serious self-reflection.

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