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Tessica Brown, the Louisiana woman known as "Gorilla Glue Girl", was emotional as she arrived in Los Angeles, California for an intensive procedure to remove superglue from her scalp after she replaced the sticky substance with her usual spritz spray.

The 40-year-old daycare owner wore a red hoodie which she pulled down over her face mask as the paparazzi snapped photos. She was accompanied by two friends who gave her emotional support.

Brown declined to answer questions from the paparazzi when asked if reps from Got 2B Glued or Gorilla Glue reached out to her.

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As TMZ first reported, Brown accepted an offer from Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Obeng to perform the 4-hour, $12,500 procedure for free.

Brown was placed under a light anesthesia during the procedure. After the procedure was over, she immediately reached for her hair to see if she had any left. She was emotional once she realized she could once again run her fingers through her hair -- although there wasn't much hair left to run her fingers through.

Dr. Obeng said used a solvent to break down the polyurethane -- the main ingredient in Gorilla Glue.

Brown said she was prepared to wear wigs and weave products for the rest of her life until she had the procedure done.

Brown went viral last week when she shared a video explaining how she replaced her usual spritz holding spray with Gorilla Glue spray because the label didn't say she couldn't spray the glue on her hair.

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In an interview with Entertainment Tonight, Brown said she's "over it" after her Instagram followers questioned whether her glue mixup was a stunt.

"The reason I went to the internet because I was never going to take this to social media [but] the reason I took it to social media was because I didn't know what else to do," she explained. "I knew somebody out there, somebody, could have told me something. I didn't think for one second it was going to be everywhere."

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When asked how she's dealing with public scrutiny that she made up the story about spraying glue in her hair, Brown denied it was a publicity stunt.

"Again, it never was -- who in they right mind would have just said, 'Oh, let me just spray this on my head and I'm going to become famous overnight?' Never. Who would want that?"
 

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Tessica Brown regrets sharing her hair-raising Gorilla Glue story on social media.

Brown became a minor celebrity overnight -- racking up 700,000 followers on Instagram -- after she shared her story about spraying Gorilla Glue in her hair.

Tessica said she took her story online to seek help and not for clout, cash and glory -- as many have suggested.

She tells Entertainment Tonight that she's "over it".

"The reason I went to the internet because I was never going to take this to social media [but] the reason I took it to social media was because I didn't know what else to do," she explained. "I knew somebody out there, somebody, could have told me something. I didn't think for one second it was going to be everywhere."

When asked how she's dealing with public scrutiny that she made up the story about spraying glue in her hair, Brown denied it was a publicity stunt.

"Again, it never was -- who in they right mind would have just said, 'Oh, let me just spray this on my head and I'm going to become famous overnight?' Never. Who would want that?"

Asked if she regretted it, Brown replied, "Definitely. I told my son today, I wish I could just, I mean, go back. Because I'm over it."

Brown denied a TMZ report that she'd hired an attorney to pursue a lawsuit against the maker of Gorilla Glue.

"No, I've never ever said that," she said. "Again, I don't know where all of this is coming from. Because, at this point, everybody is saying it."

Watch the full interview below.
 

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The woman who went viral after spraying Gorilla Glue in her hair will meet with a plastic surgeon in the hopes of saving her hair.

Tessica Brown received a generous offer from Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Obeng, who says he can save her hair in a lengthy procedure.

Brown will fly Wednesday to Louisiana -- an all expenses paid trip -- to have the procedure done, TMZ reports.

Dr. Obeng estimates it will take 2 or 3 days to completely eliminate the superglue from her scalp.

Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair was stiff as a board after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Sources tell TMZ that Brown spent 22 hours in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana, where staff used acetone, the ingredient in nail polish remover, in a failed attempt to remove the superglue.

Dr. Obeng tells TMZ he feels sorry for Tessica, and he's performing the expensive procedure free of charge. The estimated cost for the procedure is $12,500.

Brown also met with an attorney to discuss her legal options against the Gorilla Glue manufacturer.

Gorilla Glue issued a statement after Brown's story went viral.

"We are very sorry to hear about the unfortunate incident that Miss Brown experienced using our Spray Adhesive on her hair. We are glad to see in her recent video that Miss Brown has received medical treatment from her local medical facility and wish her the best."

A GofundMe account raised $14,352 of a $1,500 goal to pay for wigs and hair weave products until her hair grows back.

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Photo may have been deleted

YouTube

A Louisiana woman who sprayed Gorilla Glue in her hair is suing the maker of Gorilla Glue after emergency room staff were unable to remove the hardened adhesive.

Tessica Brown went viral after she published a TikTok video complaining that her hair was stiff as a board after using Gorilla Glue adhesive spray as holding hairspray.

Sources tell TMZ that Brown spent 22 hours in the emergency room at St. Bernard Parish Hospital, in Chalmette, Louisiana, where staff used acetone, the ingredient in nail polish remover, in a failed attempt to remove the superglue.

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YouTube, Instagram

The source said the acetone burned her scalp and softened the glue to a sticky and gooey consistency before it hardened right back up again. She lost quite a bit of hair during the procedure.

Brown was given nail polish remover pads and a bottle of sterile water to take home. She was told to keep trying to remove the glue at home.

All other remedies failed to remove the glue -- and now Brown is in danger of going bald.

The source tells TMZ Brown retained a lawyer to discuss her options and to determine if she has a legal case against Gorilla Glue.

The product label warns against using the superglue in eyes, on skin (including the scalp) or clothing.

But Brown claims the label was "misleading" and didn't specifically state that the spray can't be used on hair.

Brown claims she thought the spray would be safe to use on her hair because the label said "multi-use."

A GofundMe page raised $9,000 for hair weave products and wigs for Brown who will probably lose all of her hair.