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Foreigners continue to insult the King family as the nation celebrated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birth.

African comedian Michael Blackson (left) sparked outrage on social media when he posted an inappropriate question that suggested Dr. King cheated on his wife, the late Coretta Scott King.

Blackson, who is from Ghana, tweeted:

"I don't mean to start no sheet but I heard that Martin Luther King had a white side chick. Is it true. I'm just a beechn***a from a little village so please let me know [sic]."

He added:

"I guess the best way to get even with the white man was to F a white woman. My neega MLK [sic]."

The public backlash was fierce. Among the outraged social media users was fellow comedian Katt Williams who referred to Blackson's inquiry as a "coon question."

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Twitter

Blackson's insult comes on the heels of Rihanna's disrespectful Twitter banner that depicts Dr. King wearing a gold grill.

Blackson, 49, is best known for his roles in the comedy films Are We There Yet? and Next Friday.

See the social media posts below.

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Rihanna was dragged on Twitter.com for disrespecting civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. on his birthday.

As the nation celebrated King's birthday on Monday, the Bajan businesswoman changed her Twitter banner to a Photoshopped image of smiling Dr. King wearing a gold grill.

Rihanna is not from here so she probably didn't understand how offensive the image is. But she learned on Monday, as her followers lashed out on her timeline.

The offensive image was still posted as Rihanna's Twitter header as of Tuesday morning. The semi-retired pop star has over 104 million followers on Twitter.com.

Instead of addressing the controversy, she posted selfies with the caption: "commercial break." She also shared thirst trap photos and a video of herself wearing lingerie from her Savage X Fenty line.


 
Here is what some of her followers had to say about the MLK disrespect:

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As the nation celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Black activists say critical race theory tarnishes his legacy.

"Critical race theory points out that only one group or race is systematically racist, and that they are irredeemable and can never be forgiven," Emery McClendon told Fox News on Sunday. "That concept totally contradicts Scripture and the morals of civilized society."

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"Dr. King taught love and the need for mankind to seek to judge one another based on the content of our character, not on the color of our skin," said McClendon, a member of the Project 21 national advisory council.

Members of Project 21, a Black leadership network, also say the CRT controversy hurts King's dream of seeing all people united as one.

McClendon says critical race theory and the 1619 Project cause division and disruption among the races.

"Because the 1619 Project and Critical Race Theory have perpetuated a narrative of 'systemic racism,' it is all the more imperative that we refocus our efforts on why it is important to reach Dr. King's dream of climbing to the mountaintop," McClendon said in a press release on Sunday.

"CRT is a very harmful doctrine and at the onset of its training, causes Black students and others to always see themselves as inferior and helpless victims who are discriminated against with no possible solution for change, or advancement," McClendon told Fox News.

"We must stress that every individual is capable of obtaining success and the pursuit of the American Dream through hard work and determination," McClendon said.

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A new guaranteed income pilot in Georgia will benefit hundreds of Black women. It will be the largest guaranteed income program in the United States.

According to HuffPost, hundreds of Black women in Atlanta will get $850 per month in guaranteed income.

The program, called In Her Hands, will improve their financial stability and mental health by giving $850 per month to 650 Black women for two years.

In Her Hands will launch next year and distribute more than $13 million in guaranteed income.

The program is funded through the Georgia Resilience and Opportunity Fund, a coalition of local elected officials and nonprofits, and the nonprofit GiveDirectly.

It is intentionally being launched in Atlanta -- and specifically in the Old Fourth Ward neighborhood, where Martin Luther King Jr. grew up.

MLK promoted the concept of basic universal income for Black people who live at the poverty level.

Atlanta is among the most pronounced income inequality cities in the U.S., according to US News.

About 26% of Black women live in poverty in Atlanta, compared to 14% of white women in the city.

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Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers quoted civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. to explain why he chose not to get the mRNA vaccine.

Rodgers sparked outrage when media outlets reported he is unvaccinated after he tested positive for Covid-19.

The star quarterback will miss one game before returning next week. He is not expected to be fined or suspended for being unvaccinated.

On Friday, Rodgers ranted against "cancel culture", the "woke mob," and whoever leaked his vaccination status to the news media.

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The 2020 league MVP previously said he was "immunized" against the virus, leading many to believe he was vaccinated.

"I realize I'm in the crosshairs of the woke mob right now, so before the final nail gets put in my cancel culture casket, I'd like to set the record straight on some of the blatant lies that are out there about me now," Rodgers said during an appearance on pro wrestler Pat McAfee's YouTube show.

"At the time, my plan was to say that I've been immunized," Rodgers said.

"It wasn't some sort of ruse or lie, it was the truth. Had there been a follow up to my statement that I've been immunized, I would have responded with this. I would've said, 'Look, I'm not some sort of anti-vax flat-earther, I am somebody who is a critical thinker, you guys know me, I march to the beat of my own drum, I believe strongly in bodily autonomy.'"

Rodgers continued:

"I would add this to the mix, as an aside. But the great MLK said that you have a moral obligation to object to unjust rules and rules that make no sense."

 

 
Rodgers, who will earn $33.3 million this year, said he has an allergy to an ingredient in two of the COVID vaccines and he chose another treatment that raised his antibody levels.

He declined to name the specific treatment, saying, "I'm just going to keep it between my doctors and myself, but it was a way to stimulate my immune system to create a defense against COVID."

Twitter users argued that his treatment didn't work since he got Covid-19.

However, fully vaccinated White House press secretary Jen Psaki and Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti both tested positive for Covid-19 last week.

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Rev. Jesse Jackson's wife, Jacqueline, has been released from a Chicago hospital after spending a week in ICU for Covid-19 treatment.

"Our mother is leaving the Northwestern Memorial Hospital and coming home," their son Jonathan Jackson said in a statement to NBC Chicago. "Our family is grateful to God and the medical team that treated her and that is allowing her body to continue to heal from the COVID-19 virus."

Rev. Jesse Jackson, who is fully vaccinated, and Jacqueline Jackson, who did not receive the vaccine, both fell ill on August 20 and were taken to Northwestern where they tested positive for Covid-19. They were both admitted to the hospital on Aug. 21.

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Following treatment, Jesse Jackson, 79, was transferred to a physical rehab facility. Jacqueline Jackson, 77, was moved to ICU last week.

Rev. Jackson, who has Parkinson's disease, is receiving physical therapy and has recently tested negative for Covid-19, according to their son Jonathan.

Jonathan encouraged all those who have not been vaccinated to get the shots and thanked everyone for their prayers and support, saying, "The love that has been poured out to our family at this time of sickness and need from around the world has helped in our parent's healing."

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Jesse Jackson, a civil rights leader, was with Martin Luther King Jr. when the civil rights icon was assassinated at a Memphis motel in 1968.

Jackson is pictured on the balcony outside room 306 at the Lorraine Motel on the 50th anniversary of King's assassination on April 3, 2018. The motel is now a National Civil Rights Museum.

Rev. Jackson unsuccessfully ran for president in 1984 and 1988 and served as a shadow U.S. senator for Washington, DC from 1991 to 1997. A shadow senator is not a paid position and comes with no congressional powers.

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Alveda King, the niece of civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., wrote an op-ed for Fox News, explaining why she is forever grateful on Mother's Day.

"On Mother's Day this year I want to thank my mother for the most precious gift: My life," she wrote. "She gifted me with my life, even though at first she was uncertain about it, and even though she had to change the plans she had made for herself and her future."

Mrs. King explained that her mother, Naomi Barber, fell pregnant with her in 1950 when she courted her father, Rev. A.D. King.

Barber was a freshman at Spelman College in Atlanta and she had big dreams, King said.

"But as their relationship got more serious, they made the choice not to wait until the wedding night. When she realized she was pregnant, her first thought was to have an abortion.

"My grandmother suggested seeking the counsel of their minister, who just happened to be the man who would be my paternal grandfather, Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

"My Uncle Martin – Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. – famously had a dream that helped change the nation. My grandfather also had a dream, and it helped save my life.

"Daddy King, as he's known in the family, told my mother, 'Naomi, you can't abort this baby. I saw her in a dream three years ago. She is not a lump of flesh. She is a little girl with light skin and bright red hair.' That was me."

Read more at Fox News.

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On Monday, January 18, Americans celebrate the birth of the late civil rights icon Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King was born Michael King Jr. in Atlanta, Georgia, on January 15, 1929. He was assassinated on April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee.

Among the luminaries remembering Dr. King today is Star Trek veteran Nichelle Nichols who played Lt. Nyota Uhura in the original TV series.

In an interview with Emmy Legends, the iconic actress said Dr. King was a fan of Star Trek and he convinced her to stay on when she considered quitting the series.

Nichols said she'd already turned in her resignation when she had a chance meeting with King at an event.

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"I was to be a celebrity guest at some fundraiser in Beverly Hills," she said. "I believe that it was a NAACP fundraiser, but it might not have been but I think it was. And so, I went to do this on that Saturday night and I had just been taken to the desk and sat down when the organizer came over and said, 'Ms. Nichols, How are you? Listen, there's someone here who says that he's your biggest fan and he's desperate to meet you. He REALLY wants to meet you!' And I said, 'Well thank you!'

"...I turn and instead of a fan, there's this face that the WHOLE world knows with this beautiful smile on and I remember thinking, 'Whoever that fan is, is going to have to wait because Dr. King; Dr. Martin Luther King my leader is walking toward me about 10 feet away with a beautiful smile on his face!' and then this man says, 'Yes Ms. Nichols. I am THAT fan! I am your best fan, your greatest fan. And my family are your greatest fans. As a matter of fact, this is the ONLY show that my wife Coretta and I will allow our little children to watch; to stay up and watch because it's on past their bedtime.' And I said – which is all I was able to say because my mouth was open and closed. He said, 'We admire you greatly you know. The manner in which you create this role has dignity...' and before he said anything else I said, 'Dr. King, thank you so much.'"

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Nichols told King she was leaving the show because her true love was Broadway and the theater.

"And he said, 'What do you mean?' Dead serious. 'What are you talking about?' I said, 'I'm going to leave Star Trek because I have an offer to star in a Broadway.' I never got that far [laughs]... he said, "You cannot!" and I felt like that little boy Arnold like – Whatchu talkin’ about Dr. King? But you know I didn’t say that! I was taken aback and I didn’t say anything. I just looked at him. He said, 'If you leave Nichelle, Gene Roddenberry has opened a door for the world to see us. If you leave, that door can be closed because your role is not a Black role and it's NOT a female role. He can fill it with anything including an alien.'"

Nichols took the weekend to think it over. On Monday, she went to Gene Roddenberry's office to retract her resignation.

"I told him what happened and I said, 'If you still want me to stay, I'll stay. I have to.' And he opened his drawer and her looked up at me and said, 'God Bless Dr. Martin Luther King. Somebody knows where I am coming from!' and I said, 'That's what he said! [in my brain], and he took out my resignation which was torn into a hundred pieces and handed me the pile, and we just stood there looking at each other and I finally said, 'Thank you Gene.' And he said to me, 'Thank you Nichelle.' And my life has never been the same since and I've never looked back..."
 

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Joe Biden says George Floyd's death had a wider impact than the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination in 1968.

Floyd, 46, was killed in police custody in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25. His death at the hands of a white policeman sparked widespread protests across the country and in some parts of the world.

Biden, 77, briefly touched on Floyd's death during a roundtable in Philadelphia on Thursday. He said cellphone video of a cop kneeling on Floyd's neck inspired people to take to the streets.

"Even Dr. King's assassination did not have the worldwide impact that George Floyd's death did," said the Democratic nominee for president. "It's just like television changed the Civil Rights movement for the better when they saw Bull Connor and his dogs ripping the clothes off of elderly black women going to church and firehoses ripping the skin off of young kids.

"What happened to George Floyd — now you got how many people around the country, millions of cellphones. It’s changed the way everybody's looking at this. Look at the millions of people marching around the world."

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Monday, Jan. 20, is Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, a federal holiday in America. Black Twitter users sent the hashtag #MLKDay trending on the social media platform.

The hashtag generated tens of thousands of tweets paying tribute to the slain civil rights leader. But one tweet in particular caught Black Twitter's eye.

The tweet was sent by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), who many accused of tapping Dr. King's phones in motel rooms and sending tapes of his sexual exploits to his wife, Coretta Scott King, pictured below with King and their first child, Yolanda King, in 1956.

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The tweet accompanied a nighttime photo of a memorial to Dr. King installed at the entrance to the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

"Today, the FBI honors the life and work of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. A quote from Dr. King is etched in stone at the FBI Academy's reflection garden in Quantico as a reminder to all students and FBI employees: "The time is always right to do what is right." #MLKDay

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As they do every year when the FBI remembers King on his holiday, Black Twitter was ready to throw jabs and daggers.

Not willing to let bygones be bygones Black Twitter reminded the FBI that ex-director J. Edgar Hoover tapped Dr. King's phones and hounded him to his grave.

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Tip at march for humanity

Rapper T.I. has some aggressive fans, but not all of them are women. The rap mogul took part in Monday's March for Humanity in Atlanta to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s burial. The march began at King's Ebeneezer Baptist Church and concluded at the Georgia State Capitol.

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Bernice King, Martin Luther King, III, his daughter Yolanda King and other King family members joined hundreds of Atlantans to commemorate this day with a March for Humanity from King's Ebeneezer Baptist Church to the steps of the State Capitol building.

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